Benefits of VNC over RDP - SSH

This is a discussion on Benefits of VNC over RDP - SSH ; I've seen alot of outsourced IT companies use VNC on every machine they remotely manage for client sites. Whats the benefit of using VNC (tightvnc) over RDP?...

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Thread: Benefits of VNC over RDP

  1. Benefits of VNC over RDP

    I've seen alot of outsourced IT companies use VNC on every machine they
    remotely manage for client sites. Whats the benefit of using VNC
    (tightvnc) over RDP?


  2. Re: Benefits of VNC over RDP

    darkmoo writes:

    > I've seen alot of outsourced IT companies use VNC on every machine they
    > remotely manage for client sites. Whats the benefit of using VNC
    > (tightvnc) over RDP?


    First I'm curious what this has to do with ssh. If you don't get
    responses, another group may be more appropriate.

    Cost and cross platform benefits are two I can think of.

    The way RDP is implemented on workstations like win2k which are still
    out there in big numbers I think is another wrinkle. I'm not sure
    if you can RDP to win2k pro? At least not without a separate
    license.

    --
    Todd H.
    http://www.toddh.net/

  3. Re: Benefits of VNC over RDP

    > darkmoo writes:
    >
    > > I've seen alot of outsourced IT companies use VNC on every machine they
    > > remotely manage for client sites. Whats the benefit of using VNC
    > > (tightvnc) over RDP?

    >
    > First I'm curious what this has to do with ssh. If you don't get
    > responses, another group may be more appropriate.


    Both VNC and RDP are commonly tunneled over ssh, which I guess is why he
    asked about it here. Still it's somewhat OT.

    > Cost and cross platform benefits are two I can think of.


    I've read claims that RDP is more bandwidth-efficient => faster over slow
    links, but I haven't tried to compare them.

    > The way RDP is implemented on workstations like win2k which are still
    > out there in big numbers I think is another wrinkle. I'm not sure
    > if you can RDP to win2k pro? At least not without a separate
    > license.


    Yes, you can in Win2K. WinXP home doesn't include it, but WinXP pro does.

    --
    To reply by email, change "deadspam.com" to "alumni.utexas.net"

  4. Re: Benefits of VNC over RDP

    Andrew Schulman writes:

    > > darkmoo writes:
    > >
    > > > I've seen alot of outsourced IT companies use VNC on every machine they
    > > > remotely manage for client sites. Whats the benefit of using VNC
    > > > (tightvnc) over RDP?

    > >
    > > First I'm curious what this has to do with ssh. If you don't get
    > > responses, another group may be more appropriate.

    >
    > Both VNC and RDP are commonly tunneled over ssh, which I guess is why he
    > asked about it here. Still it's somewhat OT.
    >
    > > Cost and cross platform benefits are two I can think of.

    >
    > I've read claims that RDP is more bandwidth-efficient => faster over slow
    > links, but I haven't tried to compare them.
    >
    > > The way RDP is implemented on workstations like win2k which are still
    > > out there in big numbers I think is another wrinkle. I'm not sure
    > > if you can RDP to win2k pro? At least not without a separate
    > > license.

    >
    > Yes, you can in Win2K. WinXP home doesn't include it, but WinXP pro
    > does.


    Do you need a separate license for terminal services or what not for
    win2k pro (i.e. non win2k server)?

    Doesn't winxp home have that remote assistance thingee in it? I've
    never been terrribly clear on how if at all that related to RDP.

    Sorry to meander, but my curiosity has been piqued. I'm not terribly
    up on the implementation details of RDP and would be interested in
    knowing more. Tis an interesting discussion.

    Best Regards,
    --
    Todd H.
    http://www.toddh.net/

  5. Re: Benefits of VNC over RDP

    > Do you need a separate license for terminal services or what not for
    > win2k pro (i.e. non win2k server)?


    I don't have any Win2K installations at present, but my recollection is that
    no, you don't need an extra license to activate the remote desktop server in
    w2k pro. They just hid it some place, way down in the control panel or My
    Computer -> Properties or something like that. But once you find it you can
    turn it on, with just plain old win2k pro. That at least is my
    recollection. Then you can accept remote RDP connections. I think they
    called it "remote management" in win2k, and "remote desktop" in winxp, or
    something like that.

    > Doesn't winxp home have that remote assistance thingee in it? I've
    > never been terrribly clear on how if at all that related to RDP.


    Well there's a client and server. To connect to a WinXP host, you need to
    turn on the remote desktop server on it: right click on My Computer ->
    Properties -> Remote -> Remote Desktop -> Allow. Again I could be wrong,
    but IIRC the feature is only available in WinXP pro, not home.

    RDP (remote desktop protocol) is the network protocol used by the remote
    desktop client and server. There are RDP clients for Linux, e.g. rdesktop,
    krdc, grdesktop, tsclient, and one built into WinXP (both home and pro, I
    believe). But the only RDP server I know of is in Win2K and WinXP pro. Unix
    hosts that want to offer remote desktop access use VNC.

    --
    To reply by email, change "deadspam.com" to "alumni.utexas.net"

  6. Re: Benefits of VNC over RDP

    Andrew Schulman writes:

    > > Do you need a separate license for terminal services or what not for
    > > win2k pro (i.e. non win2k server)?

    >
    > I don't have any Win2K installations at present, but my recollection is that
    > no, you don't need an extra license to activate the remote desktop server in
    > w2k pro.


    You may be confusing Win2k Pro (the NT workstation successor) with
    Win2k Server, I think. I know Win2k Server And Win2k Advanced Server
    did include Terminal Services. Win2k pro (which I have in front of
    me), to the best of recollection and quick digging now didn't even
    have it as an option, unless I'm completely off my rocker. I think
    this is the source of our present confusion.

    > > Doesn't winxp home have that remote assistance thingee in it?
    > > I've never been terrribly clear on how if at all that related to
    > > RDP.

    >
    > Well there's a client and server. To connect to a WinXP host, you
    > need to turn on the remote desktop server on it: right click on My
    > Computer -> Properties -> Remote -> Remote Desktop -> Allow. Again
    > I could be wrong, but IIRC the feature is only available in WinXP
    > pro, not home.


    Win XP Home (at least the one I have downstairs) has remote assistance
    availble.

    With some further digging, however, I found some clarification for me
    that remote assistance is not the same as remote desktop:
    http://www.microsoft.com/technet/com...in/pw1002.mspx


    > RDP (remote desktop protocol) is the network protocol used by the remote
    > desktop client and server. There are RDP clients for Linux, e.g. rdesktop,
    > krdc, grdesktop, tsclient, and one built into WinXP (both home and pro, I
    > believe). But the only RDP server I know of is in Win2K and WinXP pro. Unix
    > hosts that want to offer remote desktop access use VNC.


    I've used both RDP and VNC clients on various OS's but the mystery of
    the licensing and such for the server side of RDP was unclear. After
    the digging and article above, I think I've got is straight.


    So, circling back: I think the answer to the original poster's
    question is probably:

    "These outsourced IT firms use VNC because it's a free,
    service level remote control server that they can access
    remotely without requiring any interaction from the user, and
    works uniformly across the popularly deployed desktop
    platforms of win2k pro, winxp home, and winxp pro."

    If they relied on RDP, they wouldn't have any way to access win2k pro
    workstations at all, and to get to XP Home workstations, the user
    would have to email and open up remote access for the support.

    Best Regards,
    --
    Todd H.
    http://www.toddh.net/

  7. Re: Benefits of VNC over RDP

    Few.

    For one thing, VNC has known bugs in Windows, some of them fairly severe (like a
    grayed out login screen until you reboot the box.) See the project's site for a
    list of reported (and unfixed) bugs. I eventually ditched VNC and went to RDP
    exclusively because of this.

    RDP tends to be lower bandwidth, better quality, and faster response than VNC.
    The traffic is also encrypted by default so you don't need to tunnel it with SSH
    like you do for VNC. You can also share resources like drives, printers,
    sounds, etc. However, RDP isn't available on all versions of Windows which is a
    major drawback and an advantage for VNC. There is an RDP client for Linux which
    seems to work well when connecting to Windows boxes.

    "darkmoo" wrote in message
    newsan.2006.08.10.06.44.33.860000@nospam.net...
    > I've seen alot of outsourced IT companies use VNC on every machine they
    > remotely manage for client sites. Whats the benefit of using VNC
    > (tightvnc) over RDP?
    >




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