Is there a way to speed up and resume a SSH X forwarding session from a disconnection? - SSH

This is a discussion on Is there a way to speed up and resume a SSH X forwarding session from a disconnection? - SSH ; I fell in love with this X forwarding method with SSH between two Linux boxes. I love being able to access my home Linux box and from my Linux machine (actually in a VMware v5.5.1, but it works well). I ...

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Thread: Is there a way to speed up and resume a SSH X forwarding session from a disconnection?

  1. Is there a way to speed up and resume a SSH X forwarding session from a disconnection?

    I fell in love with this X forwarding method with SSH between two Linux boxes. I love being
    able to access my home Linux box and from my Linux machine (actually in a VMware v5.5.1, but
    it works well).

    I did get a nasty two minutes lag. I thought I was going to lose my connection since I
    couldn't ping my home connection. If there were to be a disconnection, is it possible to
    resume the SSH X forwarding session I made earlier? Or do I have to make a new session and
    reopen all my programs again?

    Also, is there a way to tweak the speed? My cable modem connection is limited in its upload
    speed (256 Kb/sec). Its download speed is 3 Mb/sec. I was wondering if I could tweak like
    don't transfer full colors, etc.

    Thank you in advance.
    --
    "The men of experiment are like the ant; they only collect and use. But the bee...gathers its materials from the flowers of the garden and of the field, but transforms and digests it by a power of its own." --Leonardo da Vinci
    /\___/\
    / /\ /\ \ Phillip (Ant) @ http://antfarm.ma.cx (Personal Web Site)
    | |o o| | Ant's Quality Foraged Links (AQFL): http://aqfl.net
    \ _ / Please remove ANT if replying by e-mail.
    ( )

  2. Re: Is there a way to speed up and resume a SSH X forwarding session from a disconnection?

    ["Followup-To:" header set to comp.os.linux.x.]
    On Tue, 18 Apr 2006 15:03:18 -0500, ANTant@zimage.com staggered into the
    Black Sun and said:

    Fix your NNTP client so it wraps lines at <= 72 characters, please.

    > I fell in love with this X forwarding method with SSH between two
    > Linux boxes. I did get a nasty two minutes lag. I thought I was going
    > to lose my connection since I couldn't ping my home connection. If
    > there were to be a disconnection, is it possible to resume the SSH X
    > forwarding session I made earlier? Or do I have to make a new session
    > and reopen all my programs again?


    This question is kind of ill-formed, but I think you may want something
    like xmove and xmovectrl. You start a pseudo-display with xmove, then
    you set DISPLAY to that pseudo-display, and all X apps are directed
    there. You can then use xmovectrl to switch an app from one real
    display to another. This can be useful/handy, as it's practically
    impossible to switch X clients from one display to another otherwise.

    Or just deal with the hiccups. ssh connections are reasonably resistant
    to momentary lossage IME. 30 seconds where no packets are going back
    and forth = no problem. 30 *minutes*, it could drop out.

    > Also, is there a way to tweak the speed?


    You can't make a connection have more bandwidth than it has. You can
    try the -C option to ssh, though I've had mixed results with that.
    Running Firefox over ssh -XC (weakest links: T1s, 32K/s cablemodem) was
    slooow.

    > I was wondering if I could tweak like don't transfer full colors, etc.


    Not with X, not easily. Running X in 16-bit color depth instead of 24
    could help a bit, or it might not.

    --
    Matt G|There is no Darkness in Eternity/But only Light too dim for us to see
    Brainbench MVP for Linux Admin / mail: TRAP + SPAN don't belong
    http://www.brainbench.com / "He is a rhythmic movement of the
    -----------------------------/ penguins, is Tux." --MegaHAL

  3. Re: Is there a way to speed up and resume a SSH X forwarding session from a disconnection?

    >>>>> "ANTant" == ANTant writes:

    ANTant> I fell in love with this X forwarding method with SSH between
    ANTant> two Linux boxes. I love being able to access my home Linux box
    ANTant> and from my Linux machine (actually in a VMware v5.5.1, but it
    ANTant> works well).

    ANTant> I did get a nasty two minutes lag. I thought I was going to
    ANTant> lose my connection since I couldn't ping my home
    ANTant> connection. If there were to be a disconnection, is it
    ANTant> possible to resume the SSH X forwarding session I made
    ANTant> earlier? Or do I have to make a new session and reopen all my
    ANTant> programs again?

    A neat approach to this is to use VNC server on the remote Unix box, and
    connect to it with a VNC client. All your X clients talk to the VNC
    server process on the same machine. You can connect and disconnect to it
    as you like with your VNC client, and not disturb your "X state" at all.

    This is especially nice for Windows clients, since it means you can reboot
    your Windows box as many times as Bill deems necessary, and not disturb
    your X session.

    --
    Richard Silverman
    res@qoxp.net


  4. Re: Is there a way to speed up and resume a SSH X forwarding session from a disconnection?

    On Tue, 18 Apr 2006 15:03:18 -0500, ANTant wrote:
    > Also, is there a way to tweak the speed? My cable modem connection is
    > limited in its upload speed (256 Kb/sec). Its download speed is 3
    > Mb/sec. I was wondering if I could tweak like don't transfer full
    > colors, etc.


    Check out NX: http://freenx.berlios.de/

    256 Kb/sec upload should be sufficient. We're regularly using NX over
    ISDN at 64 Kb/sec up- and download.

    --
    Dipl.-Phys. Felix E. Klee
    Email: fk@linuxburg.de (work), felix.klee@inka.de (home)
    Tel: +49 721 8307937, Fax: +49 721 8307936
    Linuxburg, Goethestr. 15a, 76135 Karlsruhe, Germany

  5. Re: Is there a way to speed up and resume a SSH X forwarding session from a disconnection?

    ANTant@zimage.com wrote:
    > I fell in love with this X forwarding method with SSH between two
    > Linux boxes. I love being able to access my home Linux box and from
    > my Linux machine (actually in a VMware v5.5.1, but it works well).
    >
    > I did get a nasty two minutes lag. I thought I was going to lose my
    > connection since I couldn't ping my home connection. If there were to
    > be a disconnection, is it possible to resume the SSH X forwarding
    > session I made earlier? Or do I have to make a new session and reopen
    > all my programs again?


    That's what VNC is for. It's not as well protected as an SSH-forwarded X
    session, but the password handling at least is encrypted.

    > Also, is there a way to tweak the speed? My cable modem connection is
    > limited in its upload speed (256 Kb/sec). Its download speed is 3
    > Mb/sec. I was wondering if I could tweak like don't transfer full
    > colors, etc.


    Simplifying the settings, by using the VNC settings to do fewer colors, is
    pretty easy. But unfortunately X is notorious for being quite slow over
    long-distance, remote connections: it really was not designed for
    efficiency.



  6. Re: Is there a way to speed up and resume a SSH X forwarding session from a disconnection?

    In comp.security.ssh Richard E. Silverman wrote:
    > >>>>> "ANTant" == ANTant writes:


    > ANTant> I fell in love with this X forwarding method with SSH between
    > ANTant> two Linux boxes. I love being able to access my home Linux box
    > ANTant> and from my Linux machine (actually in a VMware v5.5.1, but it
    > ANTant> works well).


    > ANTant> I did get a nasty two minutes lag. I thought I was going to
    > ANTant> lose my connection since I couldn't ping my home
    > ANTant> connection. If there were to be a disconnection, is it
    > ANTant> possible to resume the SSH X forwarding session I made
    > ANTant> earlier? Or do I have to make a new session and reopen all my
    > ANTant> programs again?


    > A neat approach to this is to use VNC server on the remote Unix box, and
    > connect to it with a VNC client. All your X clients talk to the VNC
    > server process on the same machine. You can connect and disconnect to it
    > as you like with your VNC client, and not disturb your "X state" at all.


    Interesting. I did briefly try it on LAN at home. It was a little slow even at 100mb/sec, but
    doable. I haven't tried it over the Internet nor configured the SSH encryption for it. How do I
    access my current X session? Right now I am at work, my X is running idled with its Xscreensaver
    running. How do I access that session instead of a new X session?


    > This is especially nice for Windows clients, since it means you can reboot
    > your Windows box as many times as Bill deems necessary, and not disturb
    > your X session.


    Heh.
    --
    "The men of experiment are like the ant; they only collect and use. But the bee...gathers its materials from the flowers of the garden and of the field, but transforms and digests it by a power of its own." --Leonardo da Vinci
    /\___/\
    / /\ /\ \ Phillip (Ant) @ http://antfarm.ma.cx (Personal Web Site)
    | |o o| | Ant's Quality Foraged Links (AQFL): http://aqfl.net
    \ _ / Please remove ANT if replying by e-mail.
    ( )

  7. Re: Is there a way to speed up and resume a SSH X forwarding session from a disconnection?

    In comp.security.ssh Nico Kadel-Garcia wrote:
    > ANTant@zimage.com wrote:
    > > I fell in love with this X forwarding method with SSH between two
    > > Linux boxes. I love being able to access my home Linux box and from
    > > my Linux machine (actually in a VMware v5.5.1, but it works well).
    > >
    > > I did get a nasty two minutes lag. I thought I was going to lose my
    > > connection since I couldn't ping my home connection. If there were to
    > > be a disconnection, is it possible to resume the SSH X forwarding
    > > session I made earlier? Or do I have to make a new session and reopen
    > > all my programs again?


    > That's what VNC is for. It's not as well protected as an SSH-forwarded X
    > session, but the password handling at least is encrypted.


    Hmm, I was reading about setting up SSH for VNC. I thought the whole connection was encrypted?


    > > Also, is there a way to tweak the speed? My cable modem connection is
    > > limited in its upload speed (256 Kb/sec). Its download speed is 3
    > > Mb/sec. I was wondering if I could tweak like don't transfer full
    > > colors, etc.


    > Simplifying the settings, by using the VNC settings to do fewer colors, is
    > pretty easy. But unfortunately X is notorious for being quite slow over
    > long-distance, remote connections: it really was not designed for
    > efficiency.


    Yeah, I noticed even on LAN, VNC can be sluggish. I can't imagine doing it over the Internet.
    --
    "The men of experiment are like the ant; they only collect and use. But the bee...gathers its materials from the flowers of the garden and of the field, but transforms and digests it by a power of its own." --Leonardo da Vinci
    /\___/\
    / /\ /\ \ Phillip (Ant) @ http://antfarm.ma.cx (Personal Web Site)
    | |o o| | Ant's Quality Foraged Links (AQFL): http://aqfl.net
    \ _ / Please remove ANT if replying by e-mail.
    ( )

  8. Re: Is there a way to speed up and resume a SSH X forwarding session from a disconnection?

    >>>>> "ANTant" == ANTant writes:

    ANTant> Interesting. I did briefly try it on LAN at home. It was a
    ANTant> little slow even at 100mb/sec, but doable. I haven't tried it
    ANTant> over the Internet nor configured the SSH encryption for
    ANTant> it. How do I access my current X session? Right now I am at
    ANTant> work, my X is running idled with its Xscreensaver running. How
    ANTant> do I access that session instead of a new X session?

    You would not do this with a "real" X server; you would use the VNC
    "virtual" X server, which has a virtual display which you view with the
    VNC client.

    --
    Richard Silverman
    res@qoxp.net


  9. Re: Is there a way to speed up and resume a SSH X forwarding session from a disconnection?

    >>>>> "ANTant" == ANTant writes:

    ANTant> In comp.security.ssh Nico Kadel-Garcia
    ANTant> wrote:
    >> ANTant@zimage.com wrote: > I fell in love with this X forwarding
    >> method with SSH between two > Linux boxes. I love being able to
    >> access my home Linux box and from > my Linux machine (actually in a
    >> VMware v5.5.1, but it works well).
    >> >
    >> > I did get a nasty two minutes lag. I thought I was going to lose

    >> my > connection since I couldn't ping my home connection. If there
    >> were to > be a disconnection, is it possible to resume the SSH X
    >> forwarding > session I made earlier? Or do I have to make a new
    >> session and reopen > all my programs again?


    >> That's what VNC is for. It's not as well protected as an
    >> SSH-forwarded X session, but the password handling at least is
    >> encrypted.


    ANTant> Hmm, I was reading about setting up SSH for VNC. I thought the
    ANTant> whole connection was encrypted?

    He's talking about plain VNC -- although I believe the commercial version
    of VNC does have some kind of connection security.

    --
    Richard Silverman
    res@qoxp.net


  10. Re: Is there a way to speed up and resume a SSH X forwarding session from a disconnection?

    Richard E. Silverman wrote:
    > >>>>> "ANTant" == ANTant writes:


    > ANTant> Interesting. I did briefly try it on LAN at home. It was a
    > ANTant> little slow even at 100mb/sec, but doable. I haven't tried it
    > ANTant> over the Internet nor configured the SSH encryption for
    > ANTant> it. How do I access my current X session? Right now I am at
    > ANTant> work, my X is running idled with its Xscreensaver running. How
    > ANTant> do I access that session instead of a new X session?


    > You would not do this with a "real" X server; you would use the VNC
    > "virtual" X server, which has a virtual display which you view with the
    > VNC client.


    Ah. Rats. I was hoping to resume my current X session then. Is it possible to use this virtual X
    server for locally then and use it again remotely?
    --
    "The men of experiment are like the ant; they only collect and use. But the bee...gathers its materials from the flowers of the garden and of the field, but transforms and digests it by a power of its own." --Leonardo da Vinci
    /\___/\
    / /\ /\ \ Phillip (Ant) @ http://antfarm.ma.cx (Personal Web Site)
    | |o o| | Ant's Quality Foraged Links (AQFL): http://aqfl.net
    \ _ / Please remove ANT if replying by e-mail.
    ( )

  11. Re: Is there a way to speed up and resume a SSH X forwarding session from a disconnection?

    How weird for today... Earlier, I was getting a lock up with a spinning icon in my remote
    Mozilla session with this ssh X forwarding. NIC was blinking madly and I ran bwm-ng on my home
    Debian box:

    bwm-ng v0.5 (probing every 0.500s), press 'h' for help
    input: /proc/net/dev type: rate
    / iface Rx Tx Total
    ================================================== =========================
    lo: 0.00 KB/s 0.00 KB/s 0.00 KB/s
    eth0: 2.28 KB/s 57.18 KB/s 59.46 KB/s
    vmnet8: 0.00 KB/s 0.00 KB/s 0.00 KB/s
    vmnet1: 0.00 KB/s 0.00 KB/s 0.00 KB/s
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    total: 2.28 KB/s 57.18 KB/s 59.46 KB/s


    As you can see my upload pipe got busy. The Web page wasn't even animating or anything. I killed
    Mozilla, and my pipe got quiet. Restarted Mozilla, and then it happened again. I tried
    restarting my X session, but the problem was still there once I loaded up Mozilla.

    Any ideas why this happened? Starting mozilla via a remote gnone-terminal (also frozen when the
    problem occurs), /var/log/messages, and dmesg didn't show anything odd. CPU usage was low. I did
    run strace mozilla in remote gnome-terminal showed this during stuckage time:

    ....
    ) = 1 (in [3])
    read(3, "\1\2\3c\0\0\0\0\37\0\240\2\4\0\0\0\30\0\0\0\210M\2 1\0\20"..., 32) = 32
    writev(3, [{"H\2\6@\340\t\300\2\370\0\300\2\0\1@\0\0\1@\4\0\30\ 300\2"..., 24},
    {"\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\3 77\377"..., 65536}], 2) = 65560
    writev(3, [{"H\2\6@\340\t\300\2\370\0\300\2\0\1@\0\0\2@\4\0\30\ 300\2"..., 24},
    {"\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\3 77\377"..., 65536}], 2) = 65560
    writev(3, [{"H\2\6\10\340\t\300\2\370\0\300\2 \0@\0\0\3@\4\0\30\300"..., 8240},
    {"\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\3 77\377"..., 65536}], 2) = 73776
    writev(3, [{"H\2\6@\340\t\300\2\370\0\300\2\0\1@\0\0\1\200\4\0\ 30\300"..., 24},
    {"\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\3 77\377"..., 65536}], 2) = 65560
    writev(3, [{"H\2\6@\340\t\300\2\370\0\300\2\0\1@\0\0\2\200\4\0\ 30\300"..., 24},
    {"\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\3 77\377"..., 65536}], 2) = 32816
    writev(3, [{"\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\3 77\377"..., 32744}], 1) = -1
    EAGAIN (Resource temporarily unavailable)
    select(4, [3], [3], NULL, NULL) = 1 (out [3])
    writev(3, [{"\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\377\3 77\377"..., 32744}], 1) = 32744
    write(3, "H\2\6\10\340\t\300\2\370\0\300\2 \0@\0\0\3\200\4\0\30\300"..., 8220) = 8220
    read(3, 0xbff79c70, 32) = -1 EAGAIN (Resource temporarily unavailable)
    select(4, [3], NULL, NULL, NULL) = 1 (in [3])
    read(3, "n\2\4c\3134E\0\1\4\4\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\4\4\4\4\4\0\0 \3\37"..., 32) = 32
    read(3, 0xbff79c70, 32) = -1 EAGAIN (Resource temporarily unavailable)
    select(4, [3], NULL, NULL, NULL) = 1 (in [3])
    read(3, "n\2\6c\2025E\0\1\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0 \3\37"..., 32) = 32
    read(3, 0xbff79c70, 32) = -1 EAGAIN (Resource temporarily unavailable)
    select(4, [3], NULL, NULL, NULL) = 1 (in [3])
    read(3, "n\2\6c\0;E\0\1\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\1\0 \1\4"..., 32) = 32
    read(3, 0xbff79c70, 32) = -1 EAGAIN (Resource temporarily unavailable)
    select(4, [3], NULL, NULL, NULL
    ....

    This section seems to repeat itself over and over during the freeze.


    In comp.os.linux.x ANTant@zimage.com wrote:
    > I fell in love with this X forwarding method with SSH between two Linux boxes. I love being
    > able to access my home Linux box and from my Linux machine (actually in a VMware v5.5.1, but
    > it works well).


    > I did get a nasty two minutes lag. I thought I was going to lose my connection since I
    > couldn't ping my home connection. If there were to be a disconnection, is it possible to
    > resume the SSH X forwarding session I made earlier? Or do I have to make a new session and
    > reopen all my programs again?


    > Also, is there a way to tweak the speed? My cable modem connection is limited in its upload
    > speed (256 Kb/sec). Its download speed is 3 Mb/sec. I was wondering if I could tweak like
    > don't transfer full colors, etc.

    --
    "The men of experiment are like the ant; they only collect and use. But the bee...gathers its materials from the flowers of the garden and of the field, but transforms and digests it by a power of its own." --Leonardo da Vinci
    /\___/\
    / /\ /\ \ Phillip (Ant) @ http://antfarm.ma.cx (Personal Web Site)
    | |o o| | Ant's Quality Foraged Links (AQFL): http://aqfl.net
    \ _ / Please remove ANT if replying by e-mail.
    ( )

  12. Re: Is there a way to speed up and resume a SSH X forwarding session from a disconnection?

    On Wed, 19 Apr 2006 16:03:41 -0500, ANTant wrote:

    > I tried restarting my X session, but the
    > problem was still there once I loaded up Mozilla.


    As others have written, X in general and browsers in particular can be
    problematic over WAN links. Consider that "spinning icon" you mentioned.
    It's pointless, yet it uses bandwidth. On a LAN, that's no big deal. But
    where uplink bandwidth is limited (and perhaps even suffering from
    significant latency, depending upon the various connections involved), the
    "little wastes" can become significant.

    If your primary goal is to browse via your home connection, and if you've
    a browser on the "remote" machine (that from which you are SSHing), you
    can take a different and more efficient approach. Configure Apache (or
    some other software if that's easier for you) as an HTTP proxy on the
    machine to which you're currently SSHing. Run the browser on your
    "remote" machine, but have it use the "home" machine as a proxy.

    The browser's graphical inefficiencies will no longer matter, but HTTP
    requests will still come from your home machine.

    If there's some reason why you must use SSH for this, then configure the
    proxy as I described above but add an SSH connection that port forwards
    some port (ie. 8080) on the "remote" machine to the proxy port (probably
    port 80) on the "home" machine. Tell your browser on the "remote" machine
    to use localhost:8080 as the proxy.

    The browser will think the proxy is on that machine, but SSH's port
    forwarding magic will pass the requests to your home proxy server.

    - Andrew


  13. Re: Is there a way to speed up and resume a SSH X forwarding session from a disconnection?


    > If there's some reason why you must use SSH for this, then configure the
    > proxy as I described above but add an SSH connection that port forwards
    > some port (ie. 8080) on the "remote" machine to the proxy port (probably
    > port 80) on the "home" machine. Tell your browser on the "remote" machine
    > to use localhost:8080 as the proxy.


    If your browser supports a SOCKS proxy, you can accomplish without the
    need for a remote HTTP proxy (e.g. Squid), by using OpenSSH "dynamic" port
    forwarding:

    $ ssh -D 1080 ...

    and set your browser (running on the same machine) to use localhost:1080
    as a SOCKS proxy.

    --
    Richard Silverman
    res@qoxp.net


  14. Re: Is there a way to speed up and resume a SSH X forwarding session from a disconnection?

    In comp.security.ssh Andrew Gideon wrote:
    > On Wed, 19 Apr 2006 16:03:41 -0500, ANTant wrote:


    > > I tried restarting my X session, but the
    > > problem was still there once I loaded up Mozilla.


    > As others have written, X in general and browsers in particular can be
    > problematic over WAN links. Consider that "spinning icon" you mentioned.
    > It's pointless, yet it uses bandwidth. On a LAN, that's no big deal. But
    > where uplink bandwidth is limited (and perhaps even suffering from
    > significant latency, depending upon the various connections involved), the
    > "little wastes" can become significant.


    > If your primary goal is to browse via your home connection, and if you've
    > a browser on the "remote" machine (that from which you are SSHing), you
    > can take a different and more efficient approach. Configure Apache (or
    > some other software if that's easier for you) as an HTTP proxy on the
    > machine to which you're currently SSHing. Run the browser on your
    > "remote" machine, but have it use the "home" machine as a proxy.


    > The browser's graphical inefficiencies will no longer matter, but HTTP
    > requests will still come from your home machine.


    > If there's some reason why you must use SSH for this, then configure the
    > proxy as I described above but add an SSH connection that port forwards
    > some port (ie. 8080) on the "remote" machine to the proxy port (probably
    > port 80) on the "home" machine. Tell your browser on the "remote" machine
    > to use localhost:8080 as the proxy.


    AFAIK, the ports 8080 and others are blocked -- hence I can't use Coral Cache (including 8090).
    IT's department was having problems with its web connection. Don't know why. However, SSH was
    not affected so I used SSH to connect from a VMware v5.5.1 guest OS (Ubuntu) to my home box to
    use the Web. It was faster than dial-up, but it likes to hangs here and there for odd reasons.


    > The browser will think the proxy is on that machine, but SSH's port
    > forwarding magic will pass the requests to your home proxy server.


    Will this still work if potr 8080 is blocked?
    --
    "The men of experiment are like the ant; they only collect and use. But the bee...gathers its materials from the flowers of the garden and of the field, but transforms and digests it by a power of its own." --Leonardo da Vinci
    /\___/\
    / /\ /\ \ Phillip (Ant) @ http://antfarm.ma.cx (Personal Web Site)
    | |o o| | Ant's Quality Foraged Links (AQFL): http://aqfl.net
    \ _ / Please remove ANT if replying by e-mail.
    ( )

  15. Re: Is there a way to speed up and resume a SSH X forwarding session from a disconnection?

    On Sat, 22 Apr 2006 23:05:11 -0500, ANTant wrote:

    >> The browser will think the proxy is on that machine, but SSH's port
    >> forwarding magic will pass the requests to your home proxy server.

    >
    > Will this still work if potr 8080 is blocked?


    Yes. To your browser, the proxy server appears to be at some port on
    your local host (ie. the one where you're running your browser; not the
    machine at home on which the proxy actually is running).

    SSH's port forwarding passes the proxy traffic to your home machine. This
    is over the usual port 22 circuit created by SSH, so this part is
    independent of any firewalling between your local and home machine
    (assuming that you can establish that SSH session, of course).

    The entire point of this is that only one TCP circuit is used: the SSH
    connection. That's how firewalling becomes unimportant with respect to
    the proxy service you'll be getting from your home machine.

    - Andrew


  16. Re: Is there a way to speed up and resume a SSH X forwarding session from a disconnection?

    On Thu, 20 Apr 2006 21:27:53 -0400, Richard E. Silverman wrote:

    > If your browser supports a SOCKS proxy, you can accomplish without the
    > need for a remote HTTP proxy (e.g. Squid), by using OpenSSH "dynamic" port
    > forwarding:


    I'm not familiar with SOCKS, which is likely why I don't understand this.
    How does this work w/o a proxy server at the remote end?

    - Andrew


  17. Re: Is there a way to speed up and resume a SSH X forwarding session from a disconnection?

    On Sun, 23 Apr 2006 10:54:41 -0400, Andrew Gideon wrote:

    > I'm not familiar with SOCKS, which is likely why I don't understand this.
    > How does this work w/o a proxy server at the remote end?


    Oh, I see. The server capability is built into the SSH server. That's
    nice (if a little away from the modular side of things).

    - Andrew


  18. Re: Is there a way to speed up and resume a SSH X forwarding session from a disconnection?

    >>>>> "AG" == Andrew Gideon writes:

    AG> On Sun, 23 Apr 2006 10:54:41 -0400, Andrew Gideon wrote:
    >> I'm not familiar with SOCKS, which is likely why I don't understand
    >> this. How does this work w/o a proxy server at the remote end?


    AG> Oh, I see. The server capability is built into the SSH server.
    AG> That's nice (if a little away from the modular side of things).

    The way to think of this is that SOCKS is a TCP proxy, rather than an HTTP
    or other application-protocol-level proxy, and so more generally
    applicable.

    --
    Richard Silverman
    res@qoxp.net


  19. Re: Is there a way to speed up and resume a SSH X forwarding session from a disconnection?

    In comp.security.ssh Andrew Gideon wrote:
    > On Sat, 22 Apr 2006 23:05:11 -0500, ANTant wrote:


    > >> The browser will think the proxy is on that machine, but SSH's port
    > >> forwarding magic will pass the requests to your home proxy server.

    > >
    > > Will this still work if potr 8080 is blocked?


    > Yes. To your browser, the proxy server appears to be at some port on
    > your local host (ie. the one where you're running your browser; not the
    > machine at home on which the proxy actually is running).


    > SSH's port forwarding passes the proxy traffic to your home machine. This
    > is over the usual port 22 circuit created by SSH, so this part is
    > independent of any firewalling between your local and home machine
    > (assuming that you can establish that SSH session, of course).


    > The entire point of this is that only one TCP circuit is used: the SSH
    > connection. That's how firewalling becomes unimportant with respect to
    > the proxy service you'll be getting from your home machine.


    Interesting and thanks, Andrew. I will have to mess with this later.
    --
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