running an executable - Solaris

This is a discussion on running an executable - Solaris ; I'm the owner of a dual-booted machine with solaris on the other side. Woo-hoo. I'm to run an executable that scans for a modem but see no evidence that anything has happened, either when I run in in terminal mode ...

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Thread: running an executable

  1. running an executable


    I'm the owner of a dual-booted machine with solaris on the other side.
    Woo-hoo.

    I'm to run an executable that scans for a modem but see no evidence that
    anything has happened, either when I run in in terminal mode or just plain
    running. If this executable created a file, how would I find it?

    I'm posting the install log after my sig so that I can look at it whenever
    I am connected to usenet. Apologize for the length.

    --
    Platitude: an idea (a) that is admitted to be true by everyone, and (b)
    that is not true.
    H. L. Mencken

    Timezone setting will be TZ=UTC
    Set timezone
    disk partition info changed
    Timezone setting will be TZ=US/Mountain
    Set timezone
    Set user root in password and shadow file
    list_ufs_db:: The entry 'dan' was not found in the
    /etc/passwd table
    Set user dan in password and shadow file
    Renaming table /etc/inet/AAAEhaqLb to /etc/inet/hosts
    Disk was changed
    Disk contains valid Solaris partition
    whole_disk = 0
    diskname set = c5d0
    Set fdisk attrs
    Set zfs root pool device
    creating zpool
    TI process completed
    TI process completed successfully
    ti_create_target exited with status = 0
    TI procesing completed. Beginning transfer service
    -- Starting transfer process, Mon, 07 Jul
    2008 21:25:36 +0000 --
    Building cpio file lists
    Scanning //.
    Scanning //usr
    Scanning //opt
    Scanning //dev
    Scanning /mnt/misc/.
    Scanning /.cdrom/.
    Beginning cpio actions
    Creating zero-length files
    Extracting archive
    Performing file operations
    Fetching and updating keyboard layout
    Detected US-English keyboard layout
    -- Completed transfer process, Mon, 07 Jul
    2008 21:50:13 +0000 --
    Nwam is not enabled
    Could not enable nwam
    Setting up zfs legacy mount in /etc/vfstab
    Setting up swap mount in /etc/vfstab
    /bin/sed -e 's/^PATH/export &/' /jack/.profile
    >/a/export/home/dan/.bashrc

    setup_hostid() to path32 ->/a/kernel/misc/sysinit<-
    setup_hostid() to path64
    ->/a/kernel/misc/amd64/sysinit<-
    /usr/sbin/zpool set bootfs=rpool/ROOT/opensolaris
    rpool
    Running installgrub to set MBR
    /usr/sbin/installgrub /a/boot/grub/stage1
    /a/boot/grub/stage2 /dev/rdsk/c5d0s0
    /bin/sed -e '/^jack/d' /etc/passwd >/a/etc/passwd
    /bin/sed -e '/^jack/d' /etc/shadow >/a/etc/shadow
    /bin/sed -e 's/^jack/dan/' /etc/user_attr
    >/a/etc/user_attr

    /bin/cp /etc/inet/hosts /a/etc/inet/hosts
    Unmounting BE
    /usr/sbin/zfs unmount rpool/export/home
    /usr/sbin/zfs set mountpoint=/export/home
    rpool/export/home
    /usr/sbin/zfs unmount rpool/export
    /usr/sbin/zfs set mountpoint=/export rpool/export
    /sbin/mount -F zfs rpool/ROOT/opensolaris /a
    Running install-finish script
    /sbin/install-finish /a initial_install

  2. Re: running an executable

    On Mon, 7 Jul 2008 22:40:27 -0600, Ron Ford posted:

    > I'm the owner of a dual-booted machine with solaris on the other side.
    > Woo-hoo.
    >
    > I'm to run an executable that scans for a modem but see no evidence that
    > anything has happened, either when I run in in terminal mode or just plain
    > running. If this executable created a file, how would I find it?
    >
    > I'm posting the install log after my sig so that I can look at it whenever
    > I am connected to usenet. Apologize for the length.


    http://i26.tinypic.com/w9a1zs.png for a screenshot.
    --
    Each party steals so many articles of faith from the other, and the
    candidates spend so much time making each other's speeches, that by the
    time election day is past there is nothing much to do save turn the sitting
    rascals out and let a new gang in.
    H. L. Mencken

  3. Re: running an executable

    Ron Ford wrote:
    > I'm the owner of a dual-booted machine with solaris on the other side.
    > Woo-hoo.
    >
    > I'm to run an executable that scans for a modem but see no evidence that
    > anything has happened, either when I run in in terminal mode or just plain
    > running. If this executable created a file, how would I find it?


    So, what command did you write? With ls you'll find any file (like dir
    in DOS).

  4. Re: running an executable

    On Tue, 08 Jul 2008 10:27:30 GMT, Thommy M. posted:

    > Ron Ford wrote:
    >> I'm the owner of a dual-booted machine with solaris on the other side.
    >> Woo-hoo.
    >>
    >> I'm to run an executable that scans for a modem but see no evidence that
    >> anything has happened, either when I run in in terminal mode or just plain
    >> running. If this executable created a file, how would I find it?

    >
    > So, what command did you write? With ls you'll find any file (like dir
    > in DOS).


    I did try ls, which, along with cat, is my small vocabulary in this regard.
    Now that I've got a few more tricks, I might get past this bonehead stuff.

    Cheers,
    --
    For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and
    wrong.
    H. L. Mencken

  5. Re: running an executable

    On Tue, 08 Jul 2008 10:27:30 GMT, Thommy M. posted:

    > Ron Ford wrote:
    >> I'm the owner of a dual-booted machine with solaris on the other side.
    >> Woo-hoo.
    >>
    >> I'm to run an executable that scans for a modem but see no evidence that
    >> anything has happened, either when I run in in terminal mode or just plain
    >> running. If this executable created a file, how would I find it?

    >
    > So, what command did you write? With ls you'll find any file (like dir
    > in DOS).


    I've had an eventful afternoon as far as figuring things out on OS (is
    there a term for an acronym that is also the class of the object: Open
    Solaris is a type of Operating System)

    I had to get the right path for the command. To do this, I used the file
    browser and clicked the pencil button next to what you would call the url
    if it were browsing the net. I could then paste in the longish path.

    http://i37.tinypic.com/b61roz.png

    The other trick I had to learn for running an executable was going into
    properties and changing the permissions for it to execute
    --
    No married man is genuinely happy if he has to drink worse whisky than he
    used to drink when he was single.
    H. L. Mencken

  6. Re: running an executable

    quoting Ron Ford (Tue, 8 Jul 2008 19:07:03 -0600):

    > The other trick I had to learn for running an executable was going
    > into properties and changing the permissions for it to execute


    Things that are -MEANT- to be executed already have that bit set.

    --
    Dick Hoogendijk -- PGP/GnuPG key: 01D2433D
    ++ http://nagual.nl/ | SunOS 10u5 05/08 ++

  7. Re: running an executable

    On Wed, 09 Jul 2008 09:49:07 +0200, Dick Hoogendijk wrote:

    > quoting Ron Ford (Tue, 8 Jul 2008 19:07:03 -0600):
    >
    >> The other trick I had to learn for running an executable was going
    >> into properties and changing the permissions for it to execute

    >
    > Things that are -MEANT- to be executed already have that bit set.


    Not if they were put there using FTP :>


  8. Re: running an executable

    On Wed, 09 Jul 2008 10:30:43 -0500, Dave Uhring posted:

    > On Wed, 09 Jul 2008 09:49:07 +0200, Dick Hoogendijk wrote:
    >
    >> quoting Ron Ford (Tue, 8 Jul 2008 19:07:03 -0600):
    >>
    >>> The other trick I had to learn for running an executable was going
    >>> into properties and changing the permissions for it to execute

    >>
    >> Things that are -MEANT- to be executed already have that bit set.

    >
    > Not if they were put there using FTP :>


    I wonder if I did get Netbeans installed properly. I started by
    double-clicking the thing that looked most like setup.exe, and it prompted
    me to save it. I clerly don't have the knack of install Solaris software
    yet.
    --
    Judge: a law student who marks his own examination-papers.
    H. L. Mencken

  9. Re: running an executable

    On Wed, 09 Jul 2008 18:15:31 -0600, Ron Ford wrote:

    > I wonder if I did get Netbeans installed properly. I started by
    > double-clicking the thing that looked most like setup.exe, and it prompted
    > me to save it. I clerly don't have the knack of install Solaris software
    > yet.


    The change directory command in UNIX is the same as it is in Windows
    cmd.exe - cd. Microsoft took the CP/M convention of using the backslash
    (\) character as their delimiter whereas UNIX uses the forward slash (/).

    Your CD was mounted at /media/name_of_CD. Since that location would not
    normally be in your $PATH, you could use the complete path name to execute
    the installer script:

    # /media/name_of_CD/installer

    or your could have changed directory

    # cd /media/name_of_CD

    Then executed the command in the current working directory

    # ./installer

    The ./ is always the current working directory.

    You might want to get a text for beginners to familiarize yourself with
    UNIX. A good one is "UNIX in a Nutshell" from O'Reilly. I'm sure there
    are other good ones also but that's the one I found first.


  10. Re: running an executable

    On Wed, 09 Jul 2008 20:27:03 -0500, Dave Uhring posted:

    > On Wed, 09 Jul 2008 18:15:31 -0600, Ron Ford wrote:
    >
    >> I wonder if I did get Netbeans installed properly. I started by
    >> double-clicking the thing that looked most like setup.exe, and it prompted
    >> me to save it. I clerly don't have the knack of install Solaris software
    >> yet.

    >
    > The change directory command in UNIX is the same as it is in Windows
    > cmd.exe - cd. Microsoft took the CP/M convention of using the backslash
    > (\) character as their delimiter whereas UNIX uses the forward slash (/).
    >
    > Your CD was mounted at /media/name_of_CD. Since that location would not
    > normally be in your $PATH, you could use the complete path name to execute
    > the installer script:
    >
    > # /media/name_of_CD/installer
    >
    > or your could have changed directory
    >
    > # cd /media/name_of_CD
    >
    > Then executed the command in the current working directory
    >
    > # ./installer
    >
    > The ./ is always the current working directory.
    >
    > You might want to get a text for beginners to familiarize yourself with
    > UNIX. A good one is "UNIX in a Nutshell" from O'Reilly. I'm sure there
    > are other good ones also but that's the one I found first.


    I think I've got that book. My sysadmin buddy insists that solaris is
    different from linux. Why would he say that?
    --
    Man weeps to think that he will die so soon; woman, that she was born so
    long ago.
    H. L. Mencken

  11. Re: running an executable

    Ron Ford wrote:
    > On Wed, 09 Jul 2008 20:27:03 -0500, Dave Uhring posted:
    >
    >> On Wed, 09 Jul 2008 18:15:31 -0600, Ron Ford wrote:
    >>
    >>> I wonder if I did get Netbeans installed properly. I started by
    >>> double-clicking the thing that looked most like setup.exe, and it prompted
    >>> me to save it. I clerly don't have the knack of install Solaris software
    >>> yet.

    >> The change directory command in UNIX is the same as it is in Windows
    >> cmd.exe - cd. Microsoft took the CP/M convention of using the backslash
    >> (\) character as their delimiter whereas UNIX uses the forward slash (/).
    >>
    >> Your CD was mounted at /media/name_of_CD. Since that location would not
    >> normally be in your $PATH, you could use the complete path name to execute
    >> the installer script:
    >>
    >> # /media/name_of_CD/installer
    >>
    >> or your could have changed directory
    >>
    >> # cd /media/name_of_CD
    >>
    >> Then executed the command in the current working directory
    >>
    >> # ./installer
    >>
    >> The ./ is always the current working directory.
    >>
    >> You might want to get a text for beginners to familiarize yourself with
    >> UNIX. A good one is "UNIX in a Nutshell" from O'Reilly. I'm sure there
    >> are other good ones also but that's the one I found first.

    >
    > I think I've got that book. My sysadmin buddy insists that solaris is
    > different from linux. Why would he say that?


    Not in this case. The ways to execute files/programs are the same
    (basically).

  12. Re: running an executable

    On Fri, 11 Jul 2008 15:22:08 -0600, Ron Ford wrote:

    > I think I've got that book. My sysadmin buddy insists that solaris is
    > different from linux. Why would he say that?


    Because it's true. There are some similarities, a lot of them in fact,
    but they are fundamentally different.


  13. Re: running an executable

    On Fri, 11 Jul 2008 15:22:08 -0600, Ron Ford wrote:

    > On Wed, 09 Jul 2008 20:27:03 -0500, Dave Uhring posted:
    >
    >> On Wed, 09 Jul 2008 18:15:31 -0600, Ron Ford wrote:
    >>
    >>> I wonder if I did get Netbeans installed properly. I started by
    >>> double-clicking the thing that looked most like setup.exe, and it prompted
    >>> me to save it. I clerly don't have the knack of install Solaris software
    >>> yet.

    >>
    >> The change directory command in UNIX is the same as it is in Windows
    >> cmd.exe - cd. Microsoft took the CP/M convention of using the backslash
    >> (\) character as their delimiter whereas UNIX uses the forward slash (/).
    >>
    >> Your CD was mounted at /media/name_of_CD. Since that location would not
    >> normally be in your $PATH, you could use the complete path name to execute
    >> the installer script:
    >>
    >> # /media/name_of_CD/installer
    >>
    >> or your could have changed directory
    >>
    >> # cd /media/name_of_CD
    >>
    >> Then executed the command in the current working directory
    >>
    >> # ./installer
    >>
    >> The ./ is always the current working directory.
    >>
    >> You might want to get a text for beginners to familiarize yourself with
    >> UNIX. A good one is "UNIX in a Nutshell" from O'Reilly. I'm sure there
    >> are other good ones also but that's the one I found first.

    >
    > I think I've got that book. My sysadmin buddy insists that solaris is
    > different from linux. Why would he say that?


    Every Linux dist is different in some fashion or another too.
    You just deal with it. UNIX or whatever Lienux thinks it is - its all
    dialects. Isnt there a rosetta stone URL out there somewhere?
    The basic operations arent all THAT different


  14. Re: running an executable

    On Fri, 11 Jul 2008 14:59:23 -0700, AGT wrote:

    > Isnt there a rosetta stone URL out there somewhere?


    There was and it was really useful transitioning from Solaris to Tru64,
    even though it was a long way from complete.

    But "Firefox can't establish a connection to the server at bhami.com."

    > The basic operations arent all THAT different


    The Linux people say that they "strive" to be POSIX compliant. Sure they
    do. But I use Solaris, Linux and OpenBSD also and the basic file
    utilities are quite similar although frequent references to the man pages
    are necessary.


  15. Re: running an executable

    On Fri, 11 Jul 2008 19:16:14 -0500, Dave Uhring posted:

    > On Fri, 11 Jul 2008 14:59:23 -0700, AGT wrote:
    >
    >> Isnt there a rosetta stone URL out there somewhere?

    >
    > There was and it was really useful transitioning from Solaris to Tru64,
    > even though it was a long way from complete.
    >
    > But "Firefox can't establish a connection to the server at bhami.com."
    >
    >> The basic operations arent all THAT different

    >
    > The Linux people say that they "strive" to be POSIX compliant. Sure they
    > do. But I use Solaris, Linux and OpenBSD also and the basic file
    > utilities are quite similar although frequent references to the man pages
    > are necessary.


    I have a personal reason to want to run the OS OS. Next time I come
    around, expect me to grab Sun's wrists.

    The rosetta stone url is useful: I can't find it. Much like being in
    London, in love with your wife, and wanting to have a decent meal.

    I know there's a reason for me to give a flying fork about Sun's OS.
    Couldn't tell you what it is.
    --
    The worst government is often the most moral. One composed of cynics is
    often very tolerant and humane. But when fanatics are on top there is no
    limit to oppression.
    H. L. Mencken

  16. Re: running an executable

    On Sat, 12 Jul 2008 00:04:02 -0600, Ron Ford wrote:

    > The rosetta stone url is useful: I can't find it. Much like being in
    > London, in love with your wife, and wanting to have a decent meal.


    The site seems to be back up again: http://bhami.com/rosetta.html
    but it's a cross-reference between Unices. You really need to know at
    least one of them to make sensible use of it.

    If you have some experience with MS-DOS, there is a Linux HOWTO to help
    the transition:

    http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/DOS-Win-to-Linux-HOWTO.html

    Just be aware that there is not a one-to-one correspondence between Linux
    and Solaris. In particular, Linux killall -> Solaris pkill, but if you
    attempt a killall command in Solaris expecting to kill just the one
    process you will be unpleasantly surprised.


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