Trying out Solaris - Solaris

This is a discussion on Trying out Solaris - Solaris ; I have Solaris 10 installed as a virtual machine. I had booted into the CDE for the first time and I was poking around and we lost power then. So now when I try to boot into it now it ...

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Thread: Trying out Solaris

  1. Trying out Solaris

    I have Solaris 10 installed as a virtual machine. I had booted into the
    CDE for the first time and I was poking around and we lost power then.
    So now when I try to boot into it now it just goes to a command line and
    I'm at a bit of a loss as to what to do. I was scanning over posts in
    here and I noticed one that had a recommendation to create a user and
    not log in as root. I understand the importance of that, so I tried
    that by typing in

    useradd -c 'username' -d /export/home/homedir -m -s /bin/bash user

    (thanks Dave Uhring) and it tells me

    /bin/bash is not a valid shell

    So I'm thinking that I'm in failsafe mode maybe? Thanks for any help.

  2. Re: Trying out Solaris

    On Thu, 19 Jun 2008 17:06:18 -0500, ra wrote:

    > /bin/bash is not a valid shell


    /bin is a symlink to /usr/bin. Did you put /usr on a separate partition?
    You really should break out only swap and /export/home.

    > So I'm thinking that I'm in failsafe mode maybe? Thanks for any help.


    You probably need to run fsck to clean up the filesystems. Be sure that
    any which are mounted are mounted read-only.

    I think you can refer to the filesystems with their symbolic names:

    fsck -F ufs /
    fsck -F ufs /export/home

    If not then you will have to determine the raw devices on which the
    filesystems reside. In that case - on my system:

    fsck -F ufs /dev/rdsk/c0d0s0 for the / partition
    fsck -F ufs /dev/rdsk/c0d0s7 for the /export/home partition.


  3. Re: Trying out Solaris

    Dave Uhring wrote:
    > On Thu, 19 Jun 2008 17:06:18 -0500, ra wrote:
    >
    >> /bin/bash is not a valid shell

    >
    > /bin is a symlink to /usr/bin. Did you put /usr on a separate partition?
    > You really should break out only swap and /export/home.


    I installed it with all of the defaults. So whatever is the default is
    how I'm set up.

    >
    >> So I'm thinking that I'm in failsafe mode maybe? Thanks for any help.

    >
    > You probably need to run fsck to clean up the filesystems. Be sure that
    > any which are mounted are mounted read-only.
    >
    > I think you can refer to the filesystems with their symbolic names:
    >
    > fsck -F ufs /
    > fsck -F ufs /export/home
    >
    > If not then you will have to determine the raw devices on which the
    > filesystems reside. In that case - on my system:
    >
    > fsck -F ufs /dev/rdsk/c0d0s0 for the / partition
    > fsck -F ufs /dev/rdsk/c0d0s7 for the /export/home partition.
    >


    Thanks, this worked. I was able to create a new user account for myself
    too, but now I can't log into either environment (the CDE or the java
    one) as the user, it only lets me log in as root. How can I fix that?
    Thanks again for you help Dave.

  4. Re: Trying out Solaris

    On Thu, 19 Jun 2008 21:00:20 -0500, ra wrote:

    > Thanks, this worked. I was able to create a new user account for myself
    > too, but now I can't log into either environment (the CDE or the java
    > one) as the user, it only lets me log in as root. How can I fix that?
    > Thanks again for you help Dave.


    The user's home directory must exist and be owned by that user and have
    correct permissions. If you forgot to use the -m option in the useradd
    command then the simplest way to solve the problem is to remove the
    account and redo it with *all* the command arguments.

    userdel user_name
    useradd -c "Real Name" -d /export/home/user_name -m -s /usr/bin/bash user_name

    You should see something like "64 blocks added" after the useradd command.
    Then "passwd user_name".

  5. Re: Trying out Solaris

    Dave Uhring wrote:
    > On Thu, 19 Jun 2008 21:00:20 -0500, ra wrote:
    >
    >> Thanks, this worked. I was able to create a new user account for myself
    >> too, but now I can't log into either environment (the CDE or the java
    >> one) as the user, it only lets me log in as root. How can I fix that?
    >> Thanks again for you help Dave.

    >
    > The user's home directory must exist and be owned by that user and have
    > correct permissions. If you forgot to use the -m option in the useradd
    > command then the simplest way to solve the problem is to remove the
    > account and redo it with *all* the command arguments.
    >
    > userdel user_name
    > useradd -c "Real Name" -d /export/home/user_name -m -s /usr/bin/bash user_name
    >
    > You should see something like "64 blocks added" after the useradd command.
    > Then "passwd user_name".


    Dave, it worked a charm! Thanks for your help!

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