building Networking lab - Solaris

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  1. building Networking lab

    I am going to offer my company to be a Solaris teacher . What is
    required to build a networking lab for installing Solaris x86 in a
    networking mode using sever and workstations for every student. Is it
    worthy to install Solaris in networking or should I install in every
    PC for every trainer.

  2. Re: building Networking lab

    happytoday wrote:
    > I am going to offer my company to be a Solaris teacher . What is
    > required to build a networking lab for installing Solaris x86 in a
    > networking mode using sever and workstations for every student. Is it
    > worthy to install Solaris in networking or should I install in every
    > PC for every trainer.


    If you are asking this here, you shouldn't be considering teaching
    Solaris...

    --
    Ian Collins.

  3. Re: building Networking lab

    On 2008-01-23 17:21:14 +0000, andrew@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew
    Gabriel) said:

    > You could put desktop PC's around the classroom, but that's probably
    > the most labor intensive and highest maintenance option, even if it
    > initially looks cheap to setup.


    Is creating a JumpStart server recommended for bootstrapping a bunch of
    x86 boxes?

    Cheers,

    Chris


  4. Re: building Networking lab

    Chris Ridd wrote:
    > On 2008-01-23 17:21:14 +0000, andrew@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew
    > Gabriel) said:
    >
    >> You could put desktop PC's around the classroom, but that's probably
    >> the most labor intensive and highest maintenance option, even if it
    >> initially looks cheap to setup.

    >
    >
    > Is creating a JumpStart server recommended for bootstrapping a bunch of
    > x86 boxes?
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Chris
    >


    If you have to install, or reinstall, more than three machines JumpStart
    is probably worth the effort. The more machines you are installing, the
    more effort you can save yourself! Once your JumpStart server is
    working, each new machine needs a config file called sysidconfig, or
    something like that, with the hostname, IP addresss, netmask, etc, and
    then you can just "boot net - -install" (syntax from fading memory,
    check it!) Take a long lunch, come back, and it's done. (if you did
    everything right and are generally lucky. . . .) See the "Advanced
    Installation Manual" (title approximate, from fading; memory) for the
    sordid details.

    Look for something called "JET" or "JumpStart Enterprise Toolkit".

    If you are working on an X86 platform, Norton Ghost is an interesting
    resource. I did this once several years ago. The Ghost image required
    three CD's but today I'd do it with one DVD. Boot Ghost on each machine
    and just restore the image. . . . If you use sys-unconfig on the
    master, each newly installed machine will boot and ask for its
    configuration information.



  5. Re: building Networking lab

    On Jan 24, 12:19*am, and...@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel)
    wrote:
    > In article <5vpl03F1nfof...@mid.individual.net>,
    > * * * * Chris Ridd writes:
    >
    > > On 2008-01-23 17:21:14 +0000, and...@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew
    > > Gabriel) said:

    >
    > >> You could put desktop PC's around the classroom, but that's probably
    > >> the most labor intensive and highest maintenance option, even if it
    > >> initially looks cheap to setup.

    >
    > > Is creating a JumpStart server recommended for bootstrapping a bunch of
    > > x86 boxes?

    >
    > Yes, definately.
    >
    > --
    > Andrew Gabriel
    > [email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]


    I will use x86 platform . Whar are documentation needed for building
    such netwrok ? I will teach them Solaris basic commands so I will need
    server and workstations . How can I build such installation . What
    will be the Solaris installation on the workstations and on the
    server ?

  6. Re: building Networking lab

    happytoday wrote:

    > I will use x86 platform . Whar are documentation needed for building
    > such netwrok ? I will teach them Solaris basic commands so I will need
    > server and workstations . How can I build such installation . What
    > will be the Solaris installation on the workstations and on the
    > server ?


    If you don't know this, I suspect you are not a suitable teacher of solaris.

  7. Re: building Networking lab

    On Jan 22, 7:07 pm, happytoday wrote:
    > I am going to offer my company to be a Solaris teacher . What is
    > required to build a networking lab for installing Solaris x86 in a
    > networking mode using sever and workstations for every student. Is it
    > worthy to install Solaris in networking or should I install in every
    > PC for every trainer.


    Jumpstart on x86 will be the fastest way to install Solaris on
    clients. The clients will need to support PXE (network) booting,
    which is supported on nearly all x86 systems anymore. On PC hardware,
    instead of "boot net - install" to jumpstart, you'll set the BIOS
    option to boot from the NIC first (PXE). Here's a general idea of
    what you need to do:

    1) Install Solaris on the server and install the jumpstart server
    from the Solaris x86 CD/DVD media.
    2) If a DHCP server doesn't already exist, configure it on the
    Solaris server with /usr/sadm/admin/bin/dhcpmgr
    3) Create Jumpstart configuration files as required for your needs.
    See docs.sun.com for details
    4) Add clients to the Jumpstart server with add_install_client
    script. For x86, I use the "-d" option for DHCP. Make sure your DHCP
    server has the options shown in the "add_install_client" output.
    6) PXE boot clients to start the install.

    Note that unless you modify the GRUB menu, you still won't get a
    completely unattended install. Look for the menu.lst file under /
    tftpboot and add "- install dhcp" in between the kernel file and the "-
    B". Mine looks like this:

    <--- cut from menu.lst --->
    title Solaris_10 Jumpstart
    kernel /I86PC.Solaris_10-1/multiboot - install dhcp w kernel/
    unix -B \ install_config=js:/jumpstart/solaris10u3-x86/
    config,sysid_config=js:/jumpstart/solaris10u3-x86/
    config,install_media=js:/jumpstart/solaris10u3-x86
    module /I86PC.Solaris_10-1/x86.miniroot
    <--- end cut from menu.lst --->

  8. Re: building Networking lab

    On Jan 27, 6:03 pm, ITguy wrote:
    > On Jan 22, 7:07 pm, happytoday wrote:
    >
    > > I am going to offer my company to be a Solaris teacher . What is
    > > required to build a networking lab for installing Solaris x86 in a
    > > networking mode using sever and workstations for every student. Is it
    > > worthy to install Solaris in networking or should I install in every
    > > PC for every trainer.

    >
    > Jumpstart on x86 will be the fastest way to install Solaris on
    > clients. The clients will need to support PXE (network) booting,
    > which is supported on nearly all x86 systems anymore. On PC hardware,
    > instead of "boot net - install" to jumpstart, you'll set the BIOS
    > option to boot from the NIC first (PXE). Here's a general idea of
    > what you need to do:
    >
    > 1) Install Solaris on the server and install the jumpstart server
    > from the Solaris x86 CD/DVD media.
    > 2) If a DHCP server doesn't already exist, configure it on the
    > Solaris server with /usr/sadm/admin/bin/dhcpmgr
    > 3) Create Jumpstart configuration files as required for your needs.
    > See docs.sun.com for details
    > 4) Add clients to the Jumpstart server with add_install_client
    > script. For x86, I use the "-d" option for DHCP. Make sure your DHCP
    > server has the options shown in the "add_install_client" output.
    > 6) PXE boot clients to start the install.
    >
    > Note that unless you modify the GRUB menu, you still won't get a
    > completely unattended install. Look for the menu.lst file under /
    > tftpboot and add "- install dhcp" in between the kernel file and the "-
    > B". Mine looks like this:
    >
    > <--- cut from menu.lst --->
    > title Solaris_10 Jumpstart
    > kernel /I86PC.Solaris_10-1/multiboot - install dhcp w kernel/
    > unix -B \ install_config=js:/jumpstart/solaris10u3-x86/
    > config,sysid_config=js:/jumpstart/solaris10u3-x86/
    > config,install_media=js:/jumpstart/solaris10u3-x86
    > module /I86PC.Solaris_10-1/x86.miniroot
    > <--- end cut from menu.lst --->


    Thanks for help . Can you guide me to more Tutorial and documentation
    about such unstallation ? Thanks again for help

  9. Re: building Networking lab

    happytoday wrote:
    > On Jan 27, 6:03 pm, ITguy wrote:
    >
    >>On Jan 22, 7:07 pm, happytoday wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>I am going to offer my company to be a Solaris teacher . What is
    >>>required to build a networking lab for installing Solaris x86 in a
    >>>networking mode using sever and workstations for every student. Is it
    >>>worthy to install Solaris in networking or should I install in every
    >>>PC for every trainer.

    >>
    >>Jumpstart on x86 will be the fastest way to install Solaris on
    >>clients. The clients will need to support PXE (network) booting,
    >>which is supported on nearly all x86 systems anymore. On PC hardware,
    >>instead of "boot net - install" to jumpstart, you'll set the BIOS
    >>option to boot from the NIC first (PXE). Here's a general idea of
    >>what you need to do:
    >>
    >>1) Install Solaris on the server and install the jumpstart server
    >>from the Solaris x86 CD/DVD media.
    >>2) If a DHCP server doesn't already exist, configure it on the
    >>Solaris server with /usr/sadm/admin/bin/dhcpmgr
    >>3) Create Jumpstart configuration files as required for your needs.
    >>See docs.sun.com for details
    >>4) Add clients to the Jumpstart server with add_install_client
    >>script. For x86, I use the "-d" option for DHCP. Make sure your DHCP
    >>server has the options shown in the "add_install_client" output.
    >>6) PXE boot clients to start the install.
    >>
    >>Note that unless you modify the GRUB menu, you still won't get a
    >>completely unattended install. Look for the menu.lst file under /
    >>tftpboot and add "- install dhcp" in between the kernel file and the "-
    >>B". Mine looks like this:
    >>
    >><--- cut from menu.lst --->
    >>title Solaris_10 Jumpstart
    >> kernel /I86PC.Solaris_10-1/multiboot - install dhcp w kernel/
    >>unix -B \ install_config=js:/jumpstart/solaris10u3-x86/
    >>config,sysid_config=js:/jumpstart/solaris10u3-x86/
    >>config,install_media=js:/jumpstart/solaris10u3-x86
    >> module /I86PC.Solaris_10-1/x86.miniroot
    >><--- end cut from menu.lst --->

    >
    >
    > Thanks for help . Can you guide me to more Tutorial and documentation
    > about such unstallation ? Thanks again for help


    http://docs.sun.com/app/docs/doc/819-6397

    There is lots of other useful documentation in that general vicinity.

    As someone else pointed out, trying to teach people about an Operating
    System you know nothing about is a REALLY BAD IDEA! Hire someone who
    does know something about both Solaris and teaching!!


  10. Re: building Networking lab



    Richard B. Gilbert wrote:
    > happytoday wrote:
    >> On Jan 27, 6:03 pm, ITguy wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Jan 22, 7:07 pm, happytoday wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> I am going to offer my company to be a Solaris teacher . What is
    >>>> required to build a networking lab for installing Solaris x86 in a
    >>>> networking mode using sever and workstations for every student. Is it
    >>>> worthy to install Solaris in networking or should I install in every
    >>>> PC for every trainer.
    >>>
    >>> Jumpstart on x86 will be the fastest way to install Solaris on
    >>> clients. The clients will need to support PXE (network) booting,
    >>> which is supported on nearly all x86 systems anymore. On PC hardware,
    >>> instead of "boot net - install" to jumpstart, you'll set the BIOS
    >>> option to boot from the NIC first (PXE). Here's a general idea of
    >>> what you need to do:
    >>>
    >>> 1) Install Solaris on the server and install the jumpstart server
    >>> from the Solaris x86 CD/DVD media.
    >>> 2) If a DHCP server doesn't already exist, configure it on the
    >>> Solaris server with /usr/sadm/admin/bin/dhcpmgr
    >>> 3) Create Jumpstart configuration files as required for your needs.
    >>> See docs.sun.com for details
    >>> 4) Add clients to the Jumpstart server with add_install_client
    >>> script. For x86, I use the "-d" option for DHCP. Make sure your DHCP
    >>> server has the options shown in the "add_install_client" output.
    >>> 6) PXE boot clients to start the install.
    >>>
    >>> Note that unless you modify the GRUB menu, you still won't get a
    >>> completely unattended install. Look for the menu.lst file under /
    >>> tftpboot and add "- install dhcp" in between the kernel file and the "-
    >>> B". Mine looks like this:
    >>>
    >>> <--- cut from menu.lst --->
    >>> title Solaris_10 Jumpstart
    >>> kernel /I86PC.Solaris_10-1/multiboot - install dhcp w kernel/
    >>> unix -B \ install_config=js:/jumpstart/solaris10u3-x86/
    >>> config,sysid_config=js:/jumpstart/solaris10u3-x86/
    >>> config,install_media=js:/jumpstart/solaris10u3-x86
    >>> module /I86PC.Solaris_10-1/x86.miniroot
    >>> <--- end cut from menu.lst --->

    >>
    >>
    >> Thanks for help . Can you guide me to more Tutorial and documentation
    >> about such unstallation ? Thanks again for help

    >
    > http://docs.sun.com/app/docs/doc/819-6397
    >
    > There is lots of other useful documentation in that general vicinity.
    >
    > As someone else pointed out, trying to teach people about an Operating
    > System you know nothing about is a REALLY BAD IDEA! Hire someone who
    > does know something about both Solaris and teaching!!
    >

    I'm up for the job - both Solaris and teaching. Use to teach Solaris at
    Univ of TX.
    Where are you located?

  11. Re: building Networking lab

    On Sun, 27 Jan 2008 23:16:24 -0500, Element_SN wrote:

    > Where are you located?


    Check his NNTP-Posting-Address. Egypt.


  12. Re: building Networking lab

    Hi,

    happytoday wrote:
    > On Jan 24, 12:19 am, and...@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel)
    > wrote:
    >> In article <5vpl03F1nfof...@mid.individual.net>,
    >> Chris Ridd writes:
    >>
    >>> On 2008-01-23 17:21:14 +0000, and...@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew
    >>> Gabriel) said:
    >>>> You could put desktop PC's around the classroom, but that's probably
    >>>> the most labor intensive and highest maintenance option, even if it
    >>>> initially looks cheap to setup.
    >>> Is creating a JumpStart server recommended for bootstrapping a bunch of
    >>> x86 boxes?

    >> Yes, definately.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Andrew Gabriel
    >> [email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]

    >
    > I will use x86 platform . Whar are documentation needed for building
    > such netwrok ? I will teach them Solaris basic commands so I will need
    > server and workstations . How can I build such installation . What
    > will be the Solaris installation on the workstations and on the
    > server ?


    Get SunRays, not WS SunRays are fantastic and cheap both to deploy and
    purchase. If you have one installed you can install 10 more as quickly
    as you can unpack the box and plugthem in and nobody can screw them up
    no more reinstall!

    /michael

  13. Re: building Networking lab

    On Wed, 23 Jan 2008 15:38:34 -0500, Richard B. Gilbert wrote:

    > Chris Ridd wrote:
    >> On 2008-01-23 17:21:14 +0000, andrew@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew
    >> Gabriel) said:
    >>
    >>> You could put desktop PC's around the classroom, but that's probably
    >>> the most labor intensive and highest maintenance option, even if it
    >>> initially looks cheap to setup.

    >>
    >>
    >> Is creating a JumpStart server recommended for bootstrapping a bunch of
    >> x86 boxes?
    >>
    >> Cheers,
    >>
    >> Chris
    >>

    >
    > If you have to install, or reinstall, more than three machines JumpStart
    > is probably worth the effort. The more machines you are installing, the
    > more effort you can save yourself! Once your JumpStart server is
    > working, each new machine needs a config file called sysidconfig, or
    > something like that, with the hostname, IP addresss, netmask, etc, and
    > then you can just "boot net - -install" (syntax from fading memory,
    > check it!) Take a long lunch, come back, and it's done. (if you did
    > everything right and are generally lucky. . . .) See the "Advanced
    > Installation Manual" (title approximate, from fading; memory) for the
    > sordid details.
    >
    > Look for something called "JET" or "JumpStart Enterprise Toolkit".


    http://www.sun.com/downloads

    http://jet.maui.co.uk

    http://www.sun.com/bigadmin/content/jet/

    >
    > If you are working on an X86 platform, Norton Ghost is an interesting
    > resource. I did this once several years ago. The Ghost image required
    > three CD's but today I'd do it with one DVD. Boot Ghost on each machine
    > and just restore the image. . . . If you use sys-unconfig on the
    > master, each newly installed machine will boot and ask for its
    > configuration information.


    --
    Bruce

    "The internet is a huge and diverse community and
    not every one is friendly"
    http://www.ytc1.co.uk


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