Upgrade Laptop from Vista -> Solaris - well worth the trouble - Solaris

This is a discussion on Upgrade Laptop from Vista -> Solaris - well worth the trouble - Solaris ; Thommy M. wrote: >> Your strong distinction sounds like Solaris must not be a >> unix/linux variant? > > Solaris is UNIX in contrast to Linux. > >> Are you saying that it's yet another OS that's incompatible with linux? ...

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Thread: Upgrade Laptop from Vista -> Solaris - well worth the trouble

  1. Re: Upgrade Laptop from Vista -> Solaris - well worth the trouble

    Thommy M. wrote:

    >> Your strong distinction sounds like Solaris must not be a
    >> unix/linux variant?

    >
    > Solaris is UNIX in contrast to Linux.
    >
    >> Are you saying that it's yet another OS that's incompatible with linux?
    >> Yet another market fragmentation?

    >
    > It's Linux that is incompatible with UNIX.
    >
    > Linux is like Microsoft, trying to invent its own standards.


    Like it or not, Linux has become a 'defacto' standard.

    Of course, there are various incompatibilities between various linux
    distros, but so are there between various UNIX distros.

    But on the whole, most things that work on Linux will work on Solaris.

    To me, a computer is a tool to do a job. Solaris allows me to earn my
    living *using* the system - I don't work in the IT industry, but as a
    professional engineer.

    If I want to read a PDF someone sends me, I can do it. If I want to send
    emails I can do it. If I want to read or write a file in Word format I
    can do it.

    If I want to write software I can do it. If I want to upgrade the
    system, I do it when it suites me, rather than when the system is so
    broken it needs a fresh install of Windows.

    Running Sun hardware (as I normally do), allow me to almost forget about
    drivers and incompatible hardware. I know it will just work. That does
    not apply to the same extent on random bits of x86 hardware I would
    agree. But my laptop seems to be OK with Solaris x86, which is fine by me.

    IF I wanted to have the latest game running, a web cam, I'd probably
    look to Windows. But those things are not too important to me.

  2. Re: Upgrade Laptop from Vista -> Solaris - well worth the trouble


    "Thommy M." wrote in message
    news:AKw1j.706$R_4.642@newsb.telia.net...
    > philo wrote:
    > [...]
    > > I did give Vista a try for 3 months...
    > > then blew it away and installed PCLinuxOS.
    > > Though I mainly use Win2k...I found that PCLinuxOS was a very nice
    > > alternative.
    > > I tried Solaris a few years ago and found that it ran rather slowly so

    also
    > > gave up on that.
    > > If they've improved it over the last few years it may be worth looking

    at
    > > again.

    >
    > Solaris a "few years ago" on x86 is totally different from what is out
    > today. And now it's all open source too.
    > Have a look at http://opensolaris.org



    Ok thanks. I will try it again



  3. Re: Upgrade Laptop from Vista -> Solaris - well worth the trouble

    In article ,
    philo wrote:
    >I tried Solaris a few years ago and found that it ran rather slowly so also
    >gave up on that.
    >If they've improved it over the last few years it may be worth looking at
    >again.


    Solaris 10, _in_general_, is *rather* different than (and improved over)
    prior versions of Solaris. To give you an idea of how different the current
    iteration of Solaris is, it would probably be easier for an SA experienced
    only with Solaris 2.5 to sit down and sucessfully administer a Solaris 9
    system than it would be for a Solaris 9 admin to sit down and sucessfully
    administer a Solaris 10 system (assuming that the Solaris 10 system was
    using all of the advanced features like zones, zfs, SMF, etc). At least,
    this was the conclusion that a group of fellow Solaris admins came to over
    beers a couple months ago.

    Of course, the default WM is the "Java Desktop" (really, just Gnome) versus
    the old CDE, so you do take a bit of a performance hit, there vs. CDE (but,
    that's still selectable from the login screen). However, it's still a *far*
    lighter weight WM than Vista's Aero.

    The OS is a lot fatter than it used to be: they include more open source
    software in the standard JumpStart. They also include a "Companion" DVD so
    that you don't have to spend a month scouring the net for add-on software
    just to make your workstation/laptop useable.

    Overall, though, Solaris 10 is the first Solaris release I've actually
    been relatively enthusiastic about. It's about the first time in a long
    while that SUN has released an OS that has had features that I could point
    to and say, "wow, that's kind of cool", rather than always having to say,
    "nice to see SUN finally implementing that."
    --

    "You can only be -so- accurate with a claw-hammer." --me

  4. Re: Upgrade Laptop from Vista -> Solaris - well worth the trouble

    Dave wrote:
    > Thommy M. wrote:
    >
    >>> Your strong distinction sounds like Solaris must not be a
    >>> unix/linux variant?

    >>
    >> Solaris is UNIX in contrast to Linux.
    >>
    >>> Are you saying that it's yet another OS that's incompatible with linux?
    >>> Yet another market fragmentation?

    >>
    >> It's Linux that is incompatible with UNIX.
    >>
    >> Linux is like Microsoft, trying to invent its own standards.

    >
    > Like it or not, Linux has become a 'defacto' standard.
    >
    > Of course, there are various incompatibilities between various linux
    > distros, but so are there between various UNIX distros.
    >
    > But on the whole, most things that work on Linux will work on Solaris.
    >
    > To me, a computer is a tool to do a job. Solaris allows me to earn my
    > living *using* the system - I don't work in the IT industry, but as a
    > professional engineer.
    >
    > If I want to read a PDF someone sends me, I can do it. If I want to send
    > emails I can do it. If I want to read or write a file in Word format I
    > can do it.
    >
    > If I want to write software I can do it. If I want to upgrade the
    > system, I do it when it suites me, rather than when the system is so
    > broken it needs a fresh install of Windows.
    >
    > Running Sun hardware (as I normally do), allow me to almost forget about
    > drivers and incompatible hardware. I know it will just work. That does
    > not apply to the same extent on random bits of x86 hardware I would
    > agree. But my laptop seems to be OK with Solaris x86, which is fine by me.
    >
    > IF I wanted to have the latest game running, a web cam, I'd probably
    > look to Windows. But those things are not too important to me.


    Ok, but one thing bothers me: what do you mean by Sun hardware? Any
    available to an individual user ... ?

    --
    John Doue

  5. Re: Upgrade Laptop from Vista -> Solaris - well worth the trouble

    On Fri, 23 Nov 2007, John Doue wrote:

    > Ok, but one thing bothers me: what do you mean by Sun hardware? Any available
    > to an individual user ... ?


    He means hardware manufactured by Sun. And yes, it is all available to
    individual users--I'm typing this on my Sun Ultra 20, which is served
    by my Sun E220R server, protected by my Sun Netra T1 105 firewall. All
    machines are running Solaris, of course.

    --
    Rich Teer, SCSA, SCNA, SCSECA, OGB member

    CEO,
    My Online Home Inventory

    URLs: http://www.rite-group.com/rich
    http://www.linkedin.com/in/richteer
    http://www.myonlinehomeinventory.com

  6. Re: Upgrade Laptop from Vista -> Solaris - well worth the trouble

    John Doue wrote:

    > Ok, but one thing bothers me: what do you mean by Sun hardware? Any
    > available to an individual user ... ?


    Plenty of Sun hardware is available to an individual user.

    The Sun Ultra 20 M2 Workstation sell brand new from Sun for $895. I'm
    not sure if that is the cheapest, but it probably is the cheapest you
    would get a new machine from Sun.

    Look on eBay you will find used Sun workstations selling for as little
    as $10, to as much as $60,000. It depends how deep your pockets are.

    I bought this machine (Blade 2000) used from the USA. It cost me $1300
    including shipping to the UK. It has dual 1.2 GHz UltraSPARC III CPU's,
    8 GB of RAM and a pair of 73 GB disks, which I have since upgraded to a
    pair of 147 GB disks. It also has a decent high-end graphics card
    (XVR-1000).

    Just today I fitted a card inside, which has a complete PC on the card.
    It uses the display, keyboard, mouse, disks, but allows one to have a
    normal PC if one needs it.

    So Sun hardware is more expensive than commodity PCs, but then the
    better quality Sun hardware is built a lot better too.

    There are lots of people who run older Suns at home.

  7. Re: Upgrade Laptop from Vista -> Solaris - well worth the trouble

    John Doue wrote:

    > Ok, but one thing bothers me: what do you mean by Sun hardware? Any
    > available to an individual user ... ?
    >



    For what it is worth, there are 3 types of systems you can install
    Solaris on:

    1) Workstations manufactured by Sun with x86 type CPUs. These run
    Solaris x86, and you would have no issues with getting drivers because
    Sun would obviously write drivers for their own hardware.

    You can if you want dual boot these Windows/Solaris, since the CPU is
    x86 based.

    2) A typical PC made by just about anyone (Dell, HP, your local PC
    shop). These run Solaris x86, but getting drivers for obscure hardware
    can be an issue. But it is pretty good now. There are lists of what
    components are certified to be compatible, but a lot more are OK too.

    Again, you can if you want dual boot these Windows/Solaris, since the
    CPU is x86 based.

    3) Workstations made by Sun, but based on the SPARC processor. These run
    the SPARC version of Solaris and are quite a different animal to an x86
    machine.

    It is totally impossible to run Windows on one of these natively, as the
    CPUs are totally different. The only practical way to run Windows on the
    same machine is to fit a card like this

    http://www.sun.com/desktop/products/sunpcipro/

    which is basically a PC on a card.

    Apart from the OS being free, another nice thing about Solaris is that
    there are to my knowledge no viruses for Solaris. It may be technically
    possible to write one, but I'm not aware of any. Nobody sells anti-virus
    software to protect Solaris systems, simply because it is not needed.

    So even though the hardware is a bit more expensive than a typical PC,
    the operating system is free (unlike Vista) and you don't need
    anti-virus software.

  8. Re: Upgrade Laptop from Vista -> Solaris - well worth the trouble

    Dave wrote:
    > John Doue wrote:
    >
    >> Ok, but one thing bothers me: what do you mean by Sun hardware? Any
    >> available to an individual user ... ?
    >>

    >
    >
    > For what it is worth, there are 3 types of systems you can install
    > Solaris on:
    >
    > 1) Workstations manufactured by Sun with x86 type CPUs. These run
    > Solaris x86, and you would have no issues with getting drivers because
    > Sun would obviously write drivers for their own hardware.
    >
    > You can if you want dual boot these Windows/Solaris, since the CPU is
    > x86 based.
    >
    > 2) A typical PC made by just about anyone (Dell, HP, your local PC
    > shop). These run Solaris x86, but getting drivers for obscure hardware
    > can be an issue. But it is pretty good now. There are lists of what
    > components are certified to be compatible, but a lot more are OK too.
    >
    > Again, you can if you want dual boot these Windows/Solaris, since the
    > CPU is x86 based.
    >
    > 3) Workstations made by Sun, but based on the SPARC processor. These run
    > the SPARC version of Solaris and are quite a different animal to an x86
    > machine.
    >
    > It is totally impossible to run Windows on one of these natively, as the
    > CPUs are totally different. The only practical way to run Windows on the
    > same machine is to fit a card like this
    >
    > http://www.sun.com/desktop/products/sunpcipro/
    >
    > which is basically a PC on a card.
    >
    > Apart from the OS being free, another nice thing about Solaris is that
    > there are to my knowledge no viruses for Solaris. It may be technically
    > possible to write one, but I'm not aware of any. Nobody sells anti-virus
    > software to protect Solaris systems, simply because it is not needed.
    >
    > So even though the hardware is a bit more expensive than a typical PC,
    > the operating system is free (unlike Vista) and you don't need
    > anti-virus software.

    Thanks Dave and Rich for these explanations. Obviously, I did not know a
    thing about Sun and Solaris, thought they were meant for professionals
    only. I will keep this in mind next time I have to make an extensive
    renewal of my equipment and will try meanwhile to familiarize myself
    with Solaris ... time permitting!

    Thanks again

    --
    John Doue

  9. Re: Upgrade Laptop from Vista -> Solaris - well worth the trouble

    Dave wrote:
    > Of course, there are various incompatibilities between various linux
    > distros, but so are there between various UNIX distros.


    Worse than that, there are incompatibilities between VERSIONS of the
    same Linux distro. With Solaris, programs that worked in older
    versions, e.g. Solaris 8, still work in Solaris 10 and will work
    in future versions, it's called Backwards Compatibility.

    For example, I like to use a PostScript viewer called "ghostview"
    on my Solaris 10 desktop. I just checked the ghostview binary and
    OMG! I compiled it in 1993! I don't even remember what version of
    Solaris I was using then.

    It still runs flawlessly (the interface is not very "modern" but it works)

  10. Re: Upgrade Laptop from Vista -> Solaris - well worth the trouble

    I wrote:
    > For example, I like to use a PostScript viewer called "ghostview"
    > on my Solaris 10 desktop. I just checked the ghostview binary and
    > OMG! I compiled it in 1993! I don't even remember what version of
    > Solaris I was using then.


    Found another gem that still works too

    Help - About:
    Netscape NavigatorTM Gold
    Version 3.04
    Copyright 1994-1997 Netscape Communications Corporation, All rights reserved.

    :-)

  11. Re: Upgrade Laptop from Vista -> Solaris - well worth the trouble


    "Thomas H Jones II" wrote in message
    news:l6SdnUfbKukFbNvanZ2dnUVZ_jidnZ2d@speakeasy.ne t...
    > In article ,
    > philo wrote:
    > >I tried Solaris a few years ago and found that it ran rather slowly so

    also
    > >gave up on that.
    > >If they've improved it over the last few years it may be worth looking at
    > >again.

    >
    > Solaris 10, _in_general_, is *rather* different than (and improved over)
    > prior versions of Solaris. To give you an idea of how different the

    current
    > iteration of Solaris is, it would probably be easier for an SA experienced
    > only with Solaris 2.5 to sit down and sucessfully administer a Solaris 9
    > system than it would be for a Solaris 9 admin to sit down and sucessfully
    > administer a Solaris 10 system (assuming that the Solaris 10 system was
    > using all of the advanced features like zones, zfs, SMF, etc). At least,
    > this was the conclusion that a group of fellow Solaris admins came to over
    > beers a couple months ago.
    >
    > Of course, the default WM is the "Java Desktop" (really, just Gnome)

    versus
    > the old CDE, so you do take a bit of a performance hit, there vs. CDE

    (but,
    > that's still selectable from the login screen). However, it's still a

    *far*
    > lighter weight WM than Vista's Aero.
    >
    > The OS is a lot fatter than it used to be: they include more open source
    > software in the standard JumpStart. They also include a "Companion" DVD so
    > that you don't have to spend a month scouring the net for add-on software
    > just to make your workstation/laptop useable.
    >
    > Overall, though, Solaris 10 is the first Solaris release I've actually
    > been relatively enthusiastic about. It's about the first time in a long
    > while that SUN has released an OS that has had features that I could point
    > to and say, "wow, that's kind of cool", rather than always having to say,
    > "nice to see SUN finally implementing that."
    >



    Ok I'm going to fire up my main machine right now and download it



  12. Re: Upgrade Laptop from Vista -> Solaris - well worth the trouble

    On Fri, 23 Nov 2007 14:45:27 -0500, Oscar del Rio
    wrote:

    >I wrote:
    >> For example, I like to use a PostScript viewer called "ghostview"
    >> on my Solaris 10 desktop. I just checked the ghostview binary and
    >> OMG! I compiled it in 1993! I don't even remember what version of
    >> Solaris I was using then.

    >
    >Found another gem that still works too
    >
    >Help - About:
    >Netscape NavigatorTM Gold
    >Version 3.04
    >Copyright 1994-1997 Netscape Communications Corporation, All rights reserved.
    >
    >:-)


    Cripe, my _device driver binaries_ written for 2.0 still run.
    Amazing. Of course, that only goes back to 1992 or so ...

    OTOH, Linux is just a different beast with a totally different
    philosophy re backward compatibility. Quite intentionally. I
    happily support hardware and drivers on both

    Bill
    --
    William D Waddington
    william.waddington@beezmo.com
    "Even bugs...are unexpected signposts on
    the long road of creativity..." - Ken Burtch

  13. Re: Upgrade Laptop from Vista -> Solaris - well worth the trouble

    In article <474708f3@212.67.96.135>, Dave wrote:
    >John Doue wrote:
    >For what it is worth, there are 3 types of systems you can install
    >Solaris on:
    >
    >1) Workstations manufactured by Sun with x86 type CPUs. These run
    >Solaris x86, and you would have no issues with getting drivers because
    >Sun would obviously write drivers for their own hardware.
    >
    >You can if you want dual boot these Windows/Solaris, since the CPU is
    >x86 based.


    This is kind of muddy. "x86" is a *very* generic term that refers to any
    CPU that is generally compatible with the old 32-bit Intel produced CPUs.
    SUN currently sells hardware based on AMD64 chipsets.

    In addition to dual-booting, you *might* also be able to load Xen onto them
    and run the two OSes within VMs. At least, given that SUN had been working
    with Xen and the underlying AMD chipsets normally support that type of
    virtualization, it should be an option. I haven't had a chance to implement
    it yet on our SUN/AMD hardware.

    >
    >2) A typical PC made by just about anyone (Dell, HP, your local PC
    >shop). These run Solaris x86, but getting drivers for obscure hardware
    >can be an issue. But it is pretty good now. There are lists of what
    >components are certified to be compatible, but a lot more are OK too.
    >
    >Again, you can if you want dual boot these Windows/Solaris, since the
    >CPU is x86 based.


    Again, depending on the underlying CPUs and BIOSes, you could also use Xen
    (or another hypervisor solution - but Sun seems to be teaming with Xen,
    these days) and run multiple OSes within VMs (singly or concurrently).

    --

    "You can only be -so- accurate with a claw-hammer." --me

  14. Re: Upgrade Laptop from Vista -> Solaris - well worth the trouble

    Dave wrote:
    > Thommy M. wrote:
    >
    >>> Your strong distinction sounds like Solaris must not be a
    >>> unix/linux variant?

    >>
    >> Solaris is UNIX in contrast to Linux.
    >>
    >>> Are you saying that it's yet another OS that's incompatible with linux?
    >>> Yet another market fragmentation?

    >>
    >> It's Linux that is incompatible with UNIX.
    >>
    >> Linux is like Microsoft, trying to invent its own standards.

    >
    > Like it or not, Linux has become a 'defacto' standard.


    Nope, it is in fact so far from all standards that it competes with Windows.


  15. Re: Upgrade Laptop from Vista -> Solaris - well worth the trouble

    Dave wrote:
    > John Doue wrote:
    >
    >> Ok, but one thing bothers me: what do you mean by Sun hardware? Any
    >> available to an individual user ... ?

    >
    > Plenty of Sun hardware is available to an individual user.
    >
    > The Sun Ultra 20 M2 Workstation sell brand new from Sun for $895. I'm
    > not sure if that is the cheapest, but it probably is the cheapest you
    > would get a new machine from Sun.
    >
    > Look on eBay you will find used Sun workstations selling for as little
    > as $10, to as much as $60,000. It depends how deep your pockets are.
    >
    > I bought this machine (Blade 2000) used from the USA. It cost me $1300
    > including shipping to the UK. It has dual 1.2 GHz UltraSPARC III CPU's,
    > 8 GB of RAM and a pair of 73 GB disks, which I have since upgraded to a
    > pair of 147 GB disks. It also has a decent high-end graphics card
    > (XVR-1000).
    >
    > Just today I fitted a card inside, which has a complete PC on the card.
    > It uses the display, keyboard, mouse, disks, but allows one to have a
    > normal PC if one needs it.
    >
    > So Sun hardware is more expensive than commodity PCs, but then the
    > better quality Sun hardware is built a lot better too.
    >
    > There are lots of people who run older Suns at home.


    Ok, after a day of downloading and concatenating and burning, I have
    a solaris dvd.
    Stuff it into the machine and load up MS VirutalPC.
    Start the install....................
    ........................
    ........................
    Aborted. This requires 753MB of ram, you have only 453MB.
    GAME OVER! Don't these Sun people remember about virtual memory?
    I don't have a machine, that I care to trash, with that much ram.
    Ah for the good old days when you could run MSOFFICE, surf the web
    and have a wonderful time on 4MB of RAM. Why should it take
    753MB of ram to write a letter?

    Ok, undaunted, I try the express version.
    ....................
    .......................
    .......
    Read error, incompatible media installed.
    Hmmmmm...
    GAME 2 OVER.

    Guess I shoulda read the requirements page...silly me...

    Wonder why XP is so popular????

    mike

    --
    Return address is VALID!

  16. Re: Upgrade Laptop from Vista -> Solaris - well worth the trouble

    mike wrote:
    >
    > Ok, after a day of downloading and concatenating and burning, I have
    > a solaris dvd.
    > Stuff it into the machine and load up MS VirutalPC.
    > Start the install....................
    > ........................
    > ........................
    > Aborted. This requires 753MB of ram, you have only 453MB.
    > GAME OVER! Don't these Sun people remember about virtual memory?


    How can you have virtual memory without backing store?

    Select text install.

    --
    Ian Collins.

  17. Re: Upgrade Laptop from Vista -> Solaris - well worth the trouble

    Ian Collins wrote:
    > mike wrote:
    >> Ok, after a day of downloading and concatenating and burning, I have
    >> a solaris dvd.
    >> Stuff it into the machine and load up MS VirutalPC.
    >> Start the install....................
    >> ........................
    >> ........................
    >> Aborted. This requires 753MB of ram, you have only 453MB.
    >> GAME OVER! Don't these Sun people remember about virtual memory?

    >
    > How can you have virtual memory without backing store?
    >
    > Select text install.
    >

    Don't know about yours, but mine has a hard drive for backing store

    --
    Return address is VALID!

  18. Re: Upgrade Laptop from Vista -> Solaris - well worth the trouble


    > Ok, after a day of downloading and concatenating and burning, I have
    > a solaris dvd.
    > Stuff it into the machine and load up MS VirutalPC.
    > Start the install....................
    > .......................
    > .......................
    > Aborted. This requires 753MB of ram, you have only 453MB.
    > GAME OVER! Don't these Sun people remember about virtual memory?
    > I don't have a machine, that I care to trash, with that much ram.
    > Ah for the good old days when you could run MSOFFICE, surf the web
    > and have a wonderful time on 4MB of RAM. Why should it take
    > 753MB of ram to write a letter?
    >
    > Ok, undaunted, I try the express version.
    > ...................
    > ......................
    > ......
    > Read error, incompatible media installed.
    > Hmmmmm...
    > GAME 2 OVER.
    >
    > Guess I shoulda read the requirements page...silly me...
    >
    > Wonder why XP is so popular????
    >
    > mike
    >



    Was an error message from Solaris about requiring 753 MB of RAM? I doubt
    it is, since the requirements are for 256 MB, but 512 are recommended. I
    suspect that is your Virtual PC screwing thing up myself.

    But if you give up that easy, you will never learn enough to make
    Solaris useful to you, so I would go back to XP if I were you.

  19. Re: Upgrade Laptop from Vista -> Solaris - well worth the trouble

    It would be nice if I can go to a book shop and buy a book on Solaris
    operating system and it come with a free DVD which I can install Solaris on
    my pc.

    Few months ago I bought a book on FreeBSD and it come with a DVD and that is
    how I install my FreeBSD on my PC.
    Any problem I encounter, I can refer to the text book and immetiatelly get
    the answer.

    It is too troublesome and time consuming to search for answer by using
    google because I only have a slow speed 3g. The 3g in my country is very
    slow...same like the analog dial-up...sometime even slower.


  20. Re: Upgrade Laptop from Vista -> Solaris - well worth the trouble

    tanhkx wrote:
    > It would be nice if I can go to a book shop and buy a book on Solaris
    > operating system and it come with a free DVD which I can install Solaris on
    > my pc.


    The problem with operating systems on DVDs is that they are soon out of
    date. Solaris 10 came out in Jan 2005. The the latest release is Solaris
    10 update 4, which came out in August of this year. So that is 4
    releases of Solaris 10 in the space of 2.5 years. So unless the book is
    very new, it would be out of date quite quickly.

    Another possible issue in the UK at least is that books sold with
    software are I believe subject to 'value added tax' (VAT). I have never
    worked out what value it adds, as it costs 17.5% more.

    Solaris express, comes out more regularly still. It tends to have newer
    features, but is not as well tested as the main release.

    Why not log onto Amazon and order a book, and get Sun to send you a
    Solaris Express DVD, which they will do free of charge - not even
    postage? (Forget the SPARC versions - they will be useless to you on a PC)

    http://www.sun.com/software/solaris/...xpress/get.jsp

    Solaris Express, which is less tested than the main stable release, is
    probably better for most individuals.

    It will not take too many bytes of your dial-up modem to order a DVD and
    it will not cost you a penny/cent/ or whatever the local currency to you is!

    > Few months ago I bought a book on FreeBSD and it come with a DVD and that is
    > how I install my FreeBSD on my PC.
    > Any problem I encounter, I can refer to the text book and immetiatelly get
    > the answer.


    I suspect the release you have is somewhat out of date though.

    > It is too troublesome and time consuming to search for answer by using
    > google because I only have a slow speed 3g. The 3g in my country is very
    > slow...same like the analog dial-up...sometime even slower.
    >


    I suggest you buy a book, and order a DVD. I don't know what country you
    are in, but Sun will ship to most countries and for now at least, they
    will do so for free - normally there is a nominal charge, but there is
    not now.

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