Solaris 10, cannot ping different subnet - Solaris

This is a discussion on Solaris 10, cannot ping different subnet - Solaris ; Hi all, I am a beginner with Solaris, and I am encountering the following problem. My setup: Linksys router: 192.168.1.91 WinXP Pro pc: 192.168.1.99 Win2003 Server running on VMware on the WinXP machine: 192.168.15.129 Solaris10 8/07: 192.168.1.120 The problem: I ...

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Thread: Solaris 10, cannot ping different subnet

  1. Solaris 10, cannot ping different subnet

    Hi all, I am a beginner with Solaris, and I am encountering the following
    problem.

    My setup:
    Linksys router: 192.168.1.91
    WinXP Pro pc: 192.168.1.99
    Win2003 Server running on VMware on the WinXP machine: 192.168.15.129
    Solaris10 8/07: 192.168.1.120

    The problem:
    I cannot ping the Win2003 Server from Solaris.
    From Solaris I can ping router and WinXP.
    From WinXP and from Win2003 I can ping all the others.
    From Solaris DNS is working, I am browsing the web from Solaris now.

    here's some config info from the Solaris box:

    bash-3.00# ifconfig -a
    lo0: flags=2001000849 mtu 8232
    index 1
    inet 127.0.0.1 netmask ff000000
    rtls0: flags=1000843 mtu 1500 index 2
    inet 192.168.1.120 netmask ffffff00 broadcast 192.168.1.255
    ether 0:19:e0:11:f5:b

    bash-3.00# netstat -rn
    Routing Table: IPv4
    Destination Gateway Flags Ref Use Interface
    default 192.168.1.91 UG 1 23
    192.168.1.0 192.168.1.120 U 1 3 rtls0
    224.0.0.0 192.168.1.120 U 1 0 rtls0
    127.0.0.1 127.0.0.1 UH 4 475 lo0
    bash-3.00#

    bash-3.00# /usr/sbin/nslookup sun.com
    Server: 62.179.104.196
    Address: 62.179.104.196#53
    Non-authoritative answer:
    Name: sun.com
    Address: 72.5.124.61

    /etc/hostname.rtls0
    solarisMaxPc

    /etc/hosts
    #
    # Internet host table
    #
    127.0.0.1 localhost
    192.168.1.120 solarisMaxPC mydomain.com loghost

    /etc/netmasks
    #
    # The netmasks file associates Internet Protocol (IP) address
    # masks with IP network numbers.
    #
    # network-number netmask
    #
    # The term network-number refers to a number obtained from the Internet
    Network
    # Information Center.
    #
    # Both the network-number and the netmasks are specified in
    # "decimal dot" notation, e.g:
    #
    # 128.32.0.0 255.255.255.0
    #
    192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0

    /etc/defaultrouter
    192.168.1.91

    /etc//resolv.conf
    nameserver 62.179.104.196
    nameserver 212.142.28.69

    /etc//defaultdomain
    workgroup

    /etc//nsswitch.conf
    #
    # Copyright 2006 Sun Microsystems, Inc. All rights reserved.
    # Use is subject to license terms.
    #
    # ident "@(#)nsswitch.files 1.14 06/05/03 SMI"
    #
    # /etc/nsswitch.files:
    #
    # An example file that could be copied over to /etc/nsswitch.conf; it
    # does not use any naming service.
    #
    # "hosts:" and "services:" in this file are used only if the
    # /etc/netconfig file has a "-" for nametoaddr_libs of "inet" transports.
    passwd: files
    group: files
    hosts: files dns
    ipnodes: files dns
    networks: files
    protocols: files
    rpc: files
    ethers: files
    netmasks: files
    bootparams: files
    publickey: files
    # At present there isn't a 'files' backend for netgroup; the system will
    # figure it out pretty quickly, and won't use netgroups at all.
    netgroup: files
    automount: files
    aliases: files
    services: files
    printers: user files
    auth_attr: files
    prof_attr: files
    project: files
    tnrhtp: files
    tnrhdb: files

    /etc//networks
    #ident "@(#)networks 1.4 92/07/14 SMI" /* SVr4.0 1.1 */
    #
    # The networks file associates Internet Protocol (IP) network numbers
    # with network names. The format of this file is:
    #
    # network-name network-number nicnames . . .
    #
    #
    # The loopback network is used only for intra-machine communication
    #
    loopback 127
    #
    # Internet networks
    #
    arpanet 10 arpa # Historical
    LAN 192.168.1.120 LANalias#this is the home LAN


    Any idea?

    Thanks a lot for your help!!

    Massimo



  2. Re: Solaris 10, cannot ping different subnet


    "Andrew Gabriel" wrote in message
    news:471b5763$0$515$5a6aecb4@news.aaisp.net.uk...
    > In article ,
    > "max" writes:
    >> Hi all, I am a beginner with Solaris, and I am encountering the
    >> following
    >> problem.
    >>
    >> My setup:
    >> Linksys router: 192.168.1.91
    >> WinXP Pro pc: 192.168.1.99
    >> Win2003 Server running on VMware on the WinXP machine: 192.168.15.129
    >> Solaris10 8/07: 192.168.1.120
    >>
    >> The problem:
    >> I cannot ping the Win2003 Server from Solaris.
    >> From Solaris I can ping router and WinXP.
    >> From WinXP and from Win2003 I can ping all the others.
    >> From Solaris DNS is working, I am browsing the web from Solaris now.
    >>
    >> here's some config info from the Solaris box:
    >>
    >> bash-3.00# ifconfig -a
    >> lo0: flags=2001000849 mtu
    >> 8232
    >> index 1
    >> inet 127.0.0.1 netmask ff000000
    >> rtls0: flags=1000843 mtu 1500 index
    >> 2
    >> inet 192.168.1.120 netmask ffffff00 broadcast 192.168.1.255
    >> ether 0:19:e0:11:f5:b
    >>
    >> bash-3.00# netstat -rn
    >> Routing Table: IPv4
    >> Destination Gateway Flags Ref Use Interface
    >> default 192.168.1.91 UG 1 23
    >> 192.168.1.0 192.168.1.120 U 1 3 rtls0
    >> 224.0.0.0 192.168.1.120 U 1 0 rtls0
    >> 127.0.0.1 127.0.0.1 UH 4 475 lo0
    >> bash-3.00#
    >>
    >> /etc/defaultrouter
    >> 192.168.1.91

    >
    > Solaris doesn't know 192.168.15.0 is a network on the WinXP system
    > so it will route those packets to the default router. Try:
    >
    > route add net 192.168.15.0 192.168.1.99 1
    >
    > so packets for 192.168.15.0 network are sent to the XP system.
    > I don't know if XP will then route them to the VMware virtual machine
    > correctly, but unless it gets them in the first place, it certainly can't.
    >
    > --
    > Andrew Gabriel
    > [email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]



    Hi Andrew,

    thanks for your quick reply.
    I've tried to add that route in Solaris, and it worked, but there is still
    no reply trying to ping the server.
    Do you think that there is something that must be set on the Solaris side to
    let it 'talk' to another subnet, or shall I research more on the VMware
    side, how to make virtual networks visible to other machines in the LAN?

    bash-3.00# route add net 192.168.15.0 192.168.1.99 1
    add net 192.168.15.0: gateway 192.168.1.99
    bash-3.00# netstat -rn

    Routing Table: IPv4
    Destination Gateway Flags Ref Use Interface
    -------------------- -------------------- ----- ----- ---------- ---------
    default 192.168.1.91 UG 1 6
    192.168.1.0 192.168.1.120 U 1 4 rtls0
    192.168.15.0 192.168.1.99 UG 1 0
    224.0.0.0 192.168.1.120 U 1 0 rtls0
    127.0.0.1 127.0.0.1 UH 4 701 lo0

    bash-3.00# ping 192.168.15.129
    no answer from 192.168.15.129
    bash-3.00#


    thanks a lot
    Massimo













  3. Re: Solaris 10, cannot ping different subnet

    "max" writes:

    > Hi Andrew,
    >
    > thanks for your quick reply.
    > I've tried to add that route in Solaris, and it worked, but there is still
    > no reply trying to ping the server.
    > Do you think that there is something that must be set on the Solaris side to
    > let it 'talk' to another subnet, or shall I research more on the VMware
    > side, how to make virtual networks visible to other machines in the LAN?
    >
    > bash-3.00# route add net 192.168.15.0 192.168.1.99 1
    > add net 192.168.15.0: gateway 192.168.1.99
    > bash-3.00# netstat -rn
    >
    > Routing Table: IPv4
    > Destination Gateway Flags Ref Use Interface
    > -------------------- -------------------- ----- ----- ---------- ---------
    > default 192.168.1.91 UG 1 6
    > 192.168.1.0 192.168.1.120 U 1 4 rtls0
    > 192.168.15.0 192.168.1.99 UG 1 0
    > 224.0.0.0 192.168.1.120 U 1 0 rtls0
    > 127.0.0.1 127.0.0.1 UH 4 701 lo0
    >
    > bash-3.00# ping 192.168.15.129
    > no answer from 192.168.15.129
    > bash-3.00#


    Is the VMware instance running with NAT enabled? If so, the VMware
    instance likely won't be accessible directly. You could, for example,
    try and ssh from the Win2k3 machine to the Solaris machine and see what
    IP address you actually end up coming from by using 'who.' I would
    suspect that when you did, you'll actually observe that your IP has been
    NAT'd to 192.168.1.99.

    In VMware, I believe the other networking option would be bridged, where
    you'll give the VMware instance a 192.168.1/24 address, instead of doing
    NAT. This will give your internal setup a little bit more network
    coherency.

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