Adding a Second SATA Drive - Solaris

This is a discussion on Adding a Second SATA Drive - Solaris ; I've installed a second SATA drive in my Sun Ultra 20. The BIOS recognizes it, but when I execute reboot with the -r option the OS does not find it. I consulted the Sun documentation, but could not find a ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Adding a Second SATA Drive

  1. Adding a Second SATA Drive

    I've installed a second SATA drive in my Sun Ultra 20. The BIOS
    recognizes it, but when I execute reboot with the -r option the OS does
    not find it. I consulted the Sun documentation, but could not find a
    solution. Suggestions?


  2. Re: Adding a Second SATA Drive

    milan_sanremo wrote:
    > I've installed a second SATA drive in my Sun Ultra 20. The BIOS
    > recognizes it, but when I execute reboot with the -r option the OS does
    > not find it. I consulted the Sun documentation, but could not find a
    > solution. Suggestions?
    >



    Here are my notes:

    ----------------
    There are two ways to start the process

    Rebooting
    After typing in the statement below - reboot
    sh#>touch /reconfigure
    Go into BIOS and make sure the HD shows up

    Not Rebooting
    Add the HD without rebooting by:
    sh#>devfsadm -v -C

    Continue the process:
    Format the disk and/or check for errors
    sh#>format /dev/dsk/c3d0s2
    Create the UFS filesystem
    sh#>newfs /dev/dsk/c3d0s2
    Add an entry to /etc/vfstab
    /dev/dsk/c3d0s2 /dev/rdsk/c3d0s2 /secondDrive ufs 2 yes -

    --

    -=//-\drian Thompson=-

  3. Re: Adding a Second SATA Drive

    milan_sanremo wrote:
    > I've installed a second SATA drive in my Sun Ultra 20. The BIOS
    > recognizes it, but when I execute reboot with the -r option the OS does
    > not find it.


    What do you mean by "does not find"?

    How did you pass the -r option to the boot? It is a little more tricky with
    GrUB than it was before. If you forgot to pass the -r option a
    "devfsadm" should also be sufficient (provided the disk was already
    there during boot).

    You should first create a Solaris fdisk partition on the new disk, then
    you can label it normally via format. Even on unpartitioned disks
    format should find the disk (marked as "drive type unknown").

    A typical session after installing a new disk (c0d1) would look similar
    to:




    # devfsadm
    # format
    Searching for disks...done


    AVAILABLE DISK SELECTIONS:
    0. c0d0
    /pci@0,0/pci-ide@6/ide@0/cmdk@0,0
    1. c0d1
    /pci@0,0/pci-ide@6/ide@0/cmdk@1,0
    Specify disk (enter its number): 1



    AVAILABLE DRIVE TYPES:
    0. DEFAULT
    1. DEFAULT
    2. DEFAULT
    3. other
    Specify disk type (enter its number): 0

    [ select anything but "other" - it doesn't matter yet - BTW: I'd be *very*
    happy if IDE disk labels were more descriptive than "DEFAULT" ]

    selecting c0d1
    No current partition list
    No defect list found
    [disk formatted, no defect list found]


    FORMAT MENU:
    [...]
    format> fdisk
    No fdisk table exists. The default partition for the disk is:

    a 100% "SOLARIS System" partition

    Type "y" to accept the default partition, otherwise type "n" to edit the
    partition table.
    y
    format> pa
    partition> pr
    Current partition table (original):
    Total disk cylinders available: 15014 + 2 (reserved cylinders)

    Part Tag Flag Cylinders Size Blocks
    0 unassigned wm 0 0 (0/0/0) 0
    1 unassigned wm 0 0 (0/0/0) 0
    2 backup wu 0 - 15013 115.01GB (15014/0/0) 241199910
    3 unassigned wm 0 0 (0/0/0) 0
    4 unassigned wm 0 0 (0/0/0) 0
    5 unassigned wm 0 0 (0/0/0) 0
    6 unassigned wm 3 - 15013 114.99GB (15011/0/0) 241151715
    7 unassigned wm 0 0 (0/0/0) 0
    8 boot wu 0 - 0 7.84MB (1/0/0) 16065
    9 alternates wm 1 - 2 15.69MB (2/0/0) 32130


    [ et voila, there we are ]
    partition> label
    Ready to label disk, continue? y

    partition> q
    format> q

    [ we are done, recheck by calling format again: ]
    # format
    Searching for disks...done


    AVAILABLE DISK SELECTIONS:
    0. c0d0
    /pci@0,0/pci-ide@6/ide@0/cmdk@0,0
    1. c0d1
    /pci@0,0/pci-ide@6/ide@0/cmdk@1,0
    Specify disk (enter its number): 1
    selecting c0d1
    Controller working list found
    [disk formatted, defect list found]


    FORMAT MENU:
    format> q
    #
    [ There it is, ready to go ]

    --
    Daniel

  4. Re: Adding a Second SATA Drive

    Adrian Thompson wrote:
    > [...]
    >
    > Continue the process:
    > Format the disk and/or check for errors
    > sh#>format /dev/dsk/c3d0s2
    > Create the UFS filesystem
    > sh#>newfs /dev/dsk/c3d0s2
    > Add an entry to /etc/vfstab
    > /dev/dsk/c3d0s2 /dev/rdsk/c3d0s2 /secondDrive ufs 2 yes -
    >


    I believe this is wrong. You are overwriting the vtoc.

    You shouldn't use slice 2 which is designed to represent the whole disk.
    Create instead another slice with whole of the available space, say
    slice 0, and stick to that one.

  5. Re: Adding a Second SATA Drive

    Jean-Louis Liagre wrote:
    > Adrian Thompson wrote:
    >> [...]
    >>
    >> Continue the process:
    >> Format the disk and/or check for errors
    >> sh#>format /dev/dsk/c3d0s2
    >> Create the UFS filesystem
    >> sh#>newfs /dev/dsk/c3d0s2
    >> Add an entry to /etc/vfstab
    >> /dev/dsk/c3d0s2 /dev/rdsk/c3d0s2 /secondDrive ufs 2 yes -
    >>

    >
    > I believe this is wrong. You are overwriting the vtoc.
    >
    > You shouldn't use slice 2 which is designed to represent the whole disk.
    > Create instead another slice with whole of the available space, say
    > slice 0, and stick to that one.


    Yes. That is correct! :-)

    I will update my documentation. Thanks!

    --

    -=//-\drian Thompson=-

  6. Re: Adding a Second SATA Drive

    Jean-Louis Liagre wrote:
    > Adrian Thompson wrote:
    >> [...]
    >>
    >> Continue the process:
    >> Format the disk and/or check for errors
    >> sh#>format /dev/dsk/c3d0s2
    >> Create the UFS filesystem
    >> sh#>newfs /dev/dsk/c3d0s2
    >> Add an entry to /etc/vfstab
    >> /dev/dsk/c3d0s2 /dev/rdsk/c3d0s2 /secondDrive ufs 2 yes -
    >>

    >
    > I believe this is wrong. You are overwriting the vtoc.


    Not directly. The first sector will be untouched by UFS. sectors 1-15
    (counting from 0) may contain a boot code. The superblock begins on sector
    16.

    If you look closely than you will see that on SPARC the root slice
    traditionally also starts at cylinder 0.

    On x86 you will have problems booting from such a disk (the boot loader
    doesn't fit in 7.5 kB and has its dedicated slice (slice 8, the first
    cylinder)

    --
    Daniel

+ Reply to Thread