DVDRam - Solaris

This is a discussion on DVDRam - Solaris ; I seek an driver for DVDRam Solaris 10 1/06. Wolfgang...

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Thread: DVDRam

  1. DVDRam


    I seek an driver for DVDRam Solaris 10 1/06.

    Wolfgang




  2. Re: DVDRam

    "Wolfgang Maron" writes:

    > I seek an driver for DVDRam Solaris 10 1/06.


    Use Solaris' standard build-in "sd(7D)" driver. It supports DVD-RAM
    media in R/W mode.

    Writing to DVD-RAM media though vold might not work, so you may have
    to stop vold using "svcadm disable -t volfs".

  3. Re: DVDRam


    "Juergen Keil" schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    news:wyodxbo2dw.fsf@tools.de...
    > "Wolfgang Maron" writes:
    >
    > > I seek an driver for DVDRam Solaris 10 1/06.

    >
    > Use Solaris' standard build-in "sd(7D)" driver. It supports DVD-RAM
    > media in R/W mode.
    >
    > Writing to DVD-RAM media though vold might not work, so you may have
    > to stop vold using "svcadm disable -t volfs".


    I receive the following text:
    bash-3.00# svcadm disable -t volfs
    svcadm: Pattern 'volfs' doesn't match any instances

    Wolfgang




  4. Re: DVDRam

    "Wolfgang Maron" writes:

    > "Juergen Keil" schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    > news:wyodxbo2dw.fsf@tools.de...
    >> "Wolfgang Maron" writes:
    >>
    >> > I seek an driver for DVDRam Solaris 10 1/06.

    >>
    >> Use Solaris' standard build-in "sd(7D)" driver. It supports DVD-RAM
    >> media in R/W mode.
    >>
    >> Writing to DVD-RAM media though vold might not work, so you may have
    >> to stop vold using "svcadm disable -t volfs".

    >
    > I receive the following text:
    > bash-3.00# svcadm disable -t volfs
    > svcadm: Pattern 'volfs' doesn't match any instances



    It seems you've installed a minimum subset of the Solaris OS, a
    subset that doesn't include the "removable media" vold software
    and the volfs filesystem / service. If that's true, you don't
    have to stop vold since it isn't started in the first place.

    You can use the command "iostat -En" to list the available
    disk devices, one entry should list the dvdram device.
    From the "iostat -En" output you can find out the Solaris disk
    device name for the dvdram optical device. For example on my
    box, I get:

    % iostat -En
    ....
    c1t1d0 Soft Errors: 1 Hard Errors: 0 Transport Errors: 0
    Vendor: _NEC Product: DVD_RW ND-4550A Revision: 1.06 Serial No:
    Size: 0.00GB <0 bytes>
    Media Error: 0 Device Not Ready: 0 No Device: 0 Recoverable: 0
    Illegal Request: 1 Predictive Failure Analysis: 0
    ....

    (in case the device name is listed as "sdN", try to load / attach the
    sd driver by running "devfsadm -v -i sd" before running the "iostat
    -En" command)


    In this example, the device name is /dev/rdsk/c1t1d0*, where "*" is
    replaced by "p0" for the whole disc, "p1" .. "p4" for one of the four
    primary fdisk partitions or or "s0 .. s15" for a slice on a Solaris
    labeled media.


    An udfs dvdram media can be mounted with

    mount -F udfs /dev/dsk/c1t1d0p0 /mnt

    AFAIR, there are issues with Windows formatted pcfs dvdram media;
    Solaris' pcfs has some problems with FAT media that is using sector
    sizes different from 512 bytes (a FAT filesystem on dvdram media uses
    2K fat sectors).

    You can also fdisk / label a dvdram media and create ufs filesystems
    on them. Or create zpools / zfs filesystems on them (but that needs
    Solaris express or the upcomming S10 6/2006 release).

    Note that writing to udfs and pcfs filesystems on dvdram media is
    extremly slow on Solaris. ufs or zfs are much better.


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