Re: Why doesn't UNIX pick up viruses? - Solaris

This is a discussion on Re: Why doesn't UNIX pick up viruses? - Solaris ; GreyCloud wrote: > I'm looking for the core details as to why UNIX doesn't get viruses. > Any thoughts on the technical details? I think in theory UNIX can get viruses. In Windows, it seems that to do anything very ...

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Thread: Re: Why doesn't UNIX pick up viruses?

  1. Re: Why doesn't UNIX pick up viruses?

    GreyCloud wrote:
    > I'm looking for the core details as to why UNIX doesn't get viruses.
    > Any thoughts on the technical details?


    I think in theory UNIX can get viruses.

    In Windows, it seems that to do anything very useful you need to be a
    least a power user and in many cases administrator. I use my Windows box
    as admin all the time, since I get fed up with the hassles if I don't.

    When my wifes grandchildren wanted to use my PC, again I found the only
    way they could do what they wanted was to be admin.

    In contrast, I rarely log in as root on my UNIX boxes.

    This means that any exploit will not get too far. My web server has
    been hacked a couple of times, due to exploits in a CGI script and
    phpBB. But they can't do a lot of damage, since they are only have
    rights of user nobody. Had the webserver run as root, they could have
    done a lot more damage. It seems the Windows source code, which starts like

    #include
    #include
    #include
    #include
    #include
    #include

    is part of the problem - the origin of the code base is something was
    designed as single user, with no thought for security.

    --
    Dave K MCSE.

    MCSE = Minefield Consultant and Solitaire Expert.

    Please note my email address changes periodically to avoid spam.
    It is always of the form: month-year@domain. Hitting reply will work
    for a couple of months only. Later set it manually.

  2. Re: Why doesn't UNIX pick up viruses?

    Dave (from the UK) wrote:
    > It seems the Windows source code, which starts like
    >
    > #include
    > #include
    > #include
    > #include
    > #include
    > #include
    >
    > is part of the problem - the origin of the code base is something was
    > designed as single user, with no thought for security.
    >

    This is key - UNIX had a 20+ year head start over windows in networking
    and multi-user security.

    Bolting on security to a legacy code base isn't my idea of fun.

    --
    Ian Collins.

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