times, theu are a-changin' - Solaris

This is a discussion on times, theu are a-changin' - Solaris ; Hi all, Could someone explain the behaviour in the next sequence of events; my PC has solaris 10 and (pure hypothetical for my PC is virus free) M$Windows. My PC is switched off the day before daylight saving time will ...

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Thread: times, theu are a-changin'

  1. times, theu are a-changin'

    Hi all,

    Could someone explain the behaviour in the next sequence of events;
    my PC has solaris 10 and (pure hypothetical for my PC
    is virus free) M$Windows.

    My PC is switched off the day before daylight saving time will become
    activated
    in my timezone. PC gives correct date on both systems.

    what will happen the next day in case of:

    1. I first start MSWindows and then reboot and start solaris
    2. I boot solaris.

    Will the date on solaris be correct in both cases?

    Thanks for all replies.


  2. Re: times, theu are a-changin'

    getridofthespam@yahoo.com wrote:
    > Hi all,
    >
    > Could someone explain the behaviour in the next sequence of events;
    > my PC has solaris 10 and (pure hypothetical for my PC
    > is virus free) M$Windows.
    >
    > My PC is switched off the day before daylight saving time will become
    > activated
    > in my timezone. PC gives correct date on both systems.
    >
    > what will happen the next day in case of:
    >
    > 1. I first start MSWindows and then reboot and start solaris
    > 2. I boot solaris.
    >
    > Will the date on solaris be correct in both cases?
    >


    Try it and share your valuable experience with us :-)

  3. Re: times, theu are a-changin'

    Hey man..UR question sounds all weird. Know why? Bcos it's difficult to
    understand.
    when u install any OS may be UNIX or IDIOT MSWINDOSE, it asks in which
    timezone u sit and then for date & time.
    Systems' lithium battery keeps the internal clock ticking even if ur PC
    is shutdown. As far was first booting of any OS is concerned, the OS
    will pick the date & time from that tick tick!! If one OS is up and
    other is down then for that down OS it's good as computer in shutdown
    state.
    So now whatzur problem :-)
    I mean let us understand ur query ;-)
    Take care
    umeya


  4. Re: times, theu are a-changin'

    On Fri, 5 May 2006, umeya wrote:

    > I mean let us understand ur query ;-)


    Indeed. And if you could stop using slang like "ur" instead of "your",
    we'd understand your post more too!

    --
    Rich Teer, SCNA, SCSA, OpenSolaris CAB member

    President,
    Rite Online Inc.

    Voice: +1 (250) 979-1638
    URL: http://www.rite-group.com/rich

  5. Re: times, theu are a-changin'

    the problem is that windows uses localtime and solaris UTC.
    when windows is booted first I think windows will change the
    setting of the hardware clock, if my understanding is correct.

    in that case solaris will have different HW clocks in the 2 cases I
    described, when booted.


  6. Re: times, theu are a-changin'

    the problem is that windows uses localtime and solaris UTC.
    when windows is booted first I think windows will change the
    setting of the hardware clock, if my understanding is correct.

    in that case solaris will have different HW clocks in the 2 cases I
    described, when booted.


  7. Re: times, theu are a-changin'

    In comp.unix.solaris getridofthespam@yahoo.com wrote:
    > Hi all,


    > Could someone explain the behaviour in the next sequence of events;
    > my PC has solaris 10 and (pure hypothetical for my PC
    > is virus free) M$Windows.


    > My PC is switched off the day before daylight saving time will become
    > activated
    > in my timezone. PC gives correct date on both systems.


    [snip]

    It'd be cooler to just run the RTC in UTC and then neither OS has to
    change it when you hit a DST transition. Unfortunately, I don't know if
    this is possible for XP.

    This page suggests it used to work under NT with a simple registry
    setting. I have no idea if it still does. I need to try it at home on
    my dual-boot machine!

    http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/mswish/ut-rtc.html

    And if that works you just use rtc -z utc on the solaris side.

    --
    Darren Dunham ddunham@taos.com
    Senior Technical Consultant TAOS http://www.taos.com/
    Got some Dr Pepper? San Francisco, CA bay area
    < This line left intentionally blank to confuse you. >

  8. Re: times, theu are a-changin'

    getridofthespam@yahoo.com wrote:

    > the problem is that windows uses localtime and solaris UTC.


    What makes you think that? AFAIK both Solaris and Windows keep UTC and
    display the time adjusted for the local time zone.

    > when windows is booted first I think windows will change the
    > setting of the hardware clock, if my understanding is correct.
    >
    > in that case solaris will have different HW clocks in the 2 cases I
    > described, when booted.
    >


  9. Re: times, theu are a-changin'

    Richard B. Gilbert wrote:
    > getridofthespam@yahoo.com wrote:
    >
    >> the problem is that windows uses localtime and solaris UTC.

    >
    > What makes you think that? AFAIK both Solaris and Windows keep UTC and
    > display the time adjusted for the local time zone.


    I believe it's the opposite, the real-time clock is by default set
    on local time on both O/Ses (and x86 H/W).

    Solaris can set the RTC to UTC and in any case display whatever timezone
    one want with no particular issue.

    Windows seems to be unable to do the same thing reliably, despite an
    undocumented registry hack floating around.

    For connected machines, the simplest solution is to use rdate or an
    equivalent at boot, and then ntp.

  10. Re: times, theu are a-changin'

    In comp.unix.solaris Darren Dunham wrote:
    > This page suggests it used to work under NT with a simple registry
    > setting. I have no idea if it still does. I need to try it at home on
    > my dual-boot machine!


    > http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/mswish/ut-rtc.html


    Seems to still work on the surface for XP Pro. I've now got the BIOS in
    UTC and both Windows and Solaris realize that.

    --
    Darren Dunham ddunham@taos.com
    Senior Technical Consultant TAOS http://www.taos.com/
    Got some Dr Pepper? San Francisco, CA bay area
    < This line left intentionally blank to confuse you. >

  11. Re: times, theu are a-changin'

    In comp.unix.solaris umeya wrote:
    > Hey man..UR question sounds all weird. Know why? Bcos it's difficult to
    > understand.


    Well, I understood his question a lot better than your response to it.

    (To the OP
    What you really want to know is how the OSes write the time to the TOD
    hardware clock. Solaris normally deals with GMT at the hardware level, and
    with the Unix epoch at the OS level. Neither of them are affected at all
    by Daylight Savings.

    Now it used to be that Windows (and DOS) would write the local time directly
    to hardware, which was silly but their way of doing it. I don't know if
    this is still true, or if Solaris is capable of dealing with it gracefully.

    No answers, but at least an arrow in the right direction.
    Colin

  12. Re: times, theu are a-changin'

    On Fri, 05 May 2006 03:43:54 -0700, getridofthespa wrote:

    > Will the date on solaris be correct in both cases?


    Why did you not answer the question for yourself by actually doing what
    you imagined?

    *Plonk*


  13. Re: times, theu are a-changin'

    In article ,
    Richard B. Gilbert wrote:
    >getridofthespam@yahoo.com wrote:
    >
    >> the problem is that windows uses localtime and solaris UTC.

    >
    >What makes you think that? AFAIK both Solaris and Windows keep UTC and
    >display the time adjusted for the local time zone.


    What makes you believe that MS-WIN uses UTC?

    --
    EMail:joerg@schily.isdn.cs.tu-berlin.de (home) Jörg Schilling D-13353 Berlin
    js@cs.tu-berlin.de (uni)
    schilling@fokus.fraunhofer.de (work) Blog: http://schily.blogspot.com/
    URL: http://cdrecord.berlios.de/old/private/ ftp://ftp.berlios.de/pub/schily

  14. Re: times, theu are a-changin'

    On 6/5/06 10:33, in article 4c38qrF13sk7uU1@news.dfncis.de, "Joerg
    Schilling" wrote:

    > In article ,
    > Richard B. Gilbert wrote:
    >> getridofthespam@yahoo.com wrote:
    >>
    >>> the problem is that windows uses localtime and solaris UTC.

    >>
    >> What makes you think that? AFAIK both Solaris and Windows keep UTC and
    >> display the time adjusted for the local time zone.

    >
    > What makes you believe that MS-WIN uses UTC?


    The article written by Karkus Kuhn suggests the exact opposite!



    Cheers,

    Chris


  15. Re: times, theu are a-changin'

    Joerg Schilling wrote:

    > In article ,
    > Richard B. Gilbert wrote:
    >
    >>getridofthespam@yahoo.com wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>the problem is that windows uses localtime and solaris UTC.

    >>
    >>What makes you think that? AFAIK both Solaris and Windows keep UTC and
    >>display the time adjusted for the local time zone.

    >
    >
    > What makes you believe that MS-WIN uses UTC?
    >


    Well, it's not documented anywhere I can find (Windows 2000 Professional
    Resource Kit or Windows XP Professional Resource Kit) but both Win 2K
    and Win XP have W32TIME, Microsoft's implemenation of SNTP and both
    support time zones. These facts lead me to believe that at least the
    two versions mentioned keep UTC when properly set up. Obviously, if the
    user leaves the time zone at the default of PST and sets the clock to,
    say, Eastern time Windows will not keep UTC.

    The problem seems to be what Windows sets the hardware clock to, which
    seems to be local time. If the system then boots Solaris and Solaris
    sets it's time from the hardware clock. . . .



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