Dual boot Windows XP and Solaris 10 - Solaris

This is a discussion on Dual boot Windows XP and Solaris 10 - Solaris ; I know this has been asked n million times before (where n is large), but how does one dual boot Solaris 10 and XP? I can find n+1 million documents on the web about it, but there is a lot ...

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Thread: Dual boot Windows XP and Solaris 10

  1. Dual boot Windows XP and Solaris 10

    I know this has been asked n million times before (where n is large), but how
    does one dual boot Solaris 10 and XP? I can find n+1 million documents on the
    web about it, but there is a lot of conflict and many are rather old.


    I just installed XP, then Solaris, but succeeded in wiping out XP with the
    Solaris install - perhaps not such a bad idea!! I'm not quite sure what I
    managed to do.

    I've just started to install XP, but have partitioned the 73 GB SCSI disk like
    this in the XP *installation* program. Does this look right.

    C: Partition1 = 25 GB
    D: Partition2 = 35 GB
    Unpartitioned space = 10 GB
    Unpartitioned space = 8 MB (note MB, not GB)

    Not quite sure why I wasted 8 MB, but its not a lot!!

    The plan was to have XP on the 25 GB partition as NTFS, Solaris on the 35 GB
    partition and share the 10 GB by making it FAT-32 in XP so Solaris can mount it
    too. I think that is the general idea from what I have read.

    I've now set XP running to install in partition #1 (the 25 GB region).

    Before I waste my time installing the lot again (XP is going as I type), is this
    OK? I'm not sure if the 35 GB space should have been partitioned once XP is
    fully installed, rather than during the XP installation process.


    --
    Dave K MCSE.

    MCSE = Minefield Consultant and Solitaire Expert.

    Please note my email address changes periodically to avoid spam.
    It is always of the form: month-year@domain. Hitting reply will work
    for a couple of months only. Later set it manually.

  2. Re: Dual boot Windows XP and Solaris 10

    On Tue, 11 Apr 2006 23:53:23 +0100, Dave (from the UK) wrote:

    > I just installed XP, then Solaris, but succeeded in wiping out XP with the
    > Solaris install - perhaps not such a bad idea!! I'm not quite sure what I
    > managed to do.


    I don't know about the 3/06 release of Solaris x86 but every previous
    release clobbered the partition table, not the other OSs installed on the
    disk. Solaris just does not comply with the usual LBA-Large CHS settings
    of 255 heads and 63 sectors/head.

    Repair your partition table after installation of Solaris and it should
    work properly. Use Linux fdisk from a bootable Linux CD to do this.

    > I've just started to install XP, but have partitioned the 73 GB SCSI disk like
    > this in the XP *installation* program. Does this look right.
    >
    > C: Partition1 = 25 GB
    > D: Partition2 = 35 GB
    > Unpartitioned space = 10 GB
    > Unpartitioned space = 8 MB (note MB, not GB)


    C: and D: have no meaning whatsoever, even in the Windows world. All of
    those partitions must be DOS primary partitions.

    > Not quite sure why I wasted 8 MB, but its not a lot!!


    You have lost part of your innermost cylinder because of a defective
    partition table tool.

    > Before I waste my time installing the lot again (XP is going as I type), is this
    > OK? I'm not sure if the 35 GB space should have been partitioned once XP is
    > fully installed, rather than during the XP installation process.


    Use a proper tool (Linux fdisk) to create the partition table *before* any
    OS installation and use the same tool after installation to fix the
    partition table. Linux fdisk does not touch the first 446 bytes of sector
    0, which is the boot binary, or the last two bytes, just the 64 bytes
    which contain the partition table.


  3. Re: Dual boot Windows XP and Solaris 10

    Dave Uhring wrote:
    > On Tue, 11 Apr 2006 23:53:23 +0100, Dave (from the UK) wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I just installed XP, then Solaris, but succeeded in wiping out XP with the
    >>Solaris install - perhaps not such a bad idea!! I'm not quite sure what I
    >>managed to do.

    >
    >
    > I don't know about the 3/06 release of Solaris x86 but every previous
    > release clobbered the partition table, not the other OSs installed on the
    > disk. Solaris just does not comply with the usual LBA-Large CHS settings
    > of 255 heads and 63 sectors/head.


    I suspect you are right, as when I changed the active partition to the one I
    thought had XP on, there was a an error on rebooting something like

    BAD PBR
    PBR = primary boot record.

    http://forum.sun.com/jive/thread.jsp...6418&tstart=75

    > Repair your partition table after installation of Solaris and it should
    > work properly. Use Linux fdisk from a bootable Linux CD to do this.


    But there are plenty of references to installing Windoze and Solaris without
    using Linux. I must admit, I am a bit confused.

    >>I've just started to install XP, but have partitioned the 73 GB SCSI disk like
    >>this in the XP *installation* program. Does this look right.
    >>
    >>C: Partition1 = 25 GB
    >>D: Partition2 = 35 GB
    >>Unpartitioned space = 10 GB
    >>Unpartitioned space = 8 MB (note MB, not GB)

    >
    >
    > C: and D: have no meaning whatsoever, even in the Windows world. All of
    > those partitions must be DOS primary partitions.
    >


    That was what the XP installation program said - I'm basically quoting from
    that, although I have rounded the sizes a bit.


    >>Not quite sure why I wasted 8 MB, but its not a lot!!

    >
    >
    > You have lost part of your innermost cylinder because of a defective
    > partition table tool.


    Em, so it is likely I am going to die again.

    As I write, XP has been installed again and Solaris is in the process of being
    installed. The Solaris install seems:

    disk Type start cylinder end cylinder
    c2t0d0 Unknown 0 3187 preserve
    c2t0d0 unknown 3187 5736 delete
    c2t0d0 DOSEXTLBA 3187 4462 add

    No idea what will happen here.

    >>Before I waste my time installing the lot again (XP is going as I type), is this
    >>OK? I'm not sure if the 35 GB space should have been partitioned once XP is
    >>fully installed, rather than during the XP installation process.

    >
    >
    > Use a proper tool (Linux fdisk) to create the partition table *before* any
    > OS installation and use the same tool after installation to fix the
    > partition table. Linux fdisk does not touch the first 446 bytes of sector
    > 0, which is the boot binary, or the last two bytes, just the 64 bytes
    > which contain the partition table.
    >


    Em,
    a bit late for that now, as I'd already got XP installed and part of Solaris
    before you replied. If this fails again, as I expect it will, I will look at
    using Linux. But I am sure others have not needed to use Linux to do this.

    --
    Dave K MCSE.

    MCSE = Minefield Consultant and Solitaire Expert.

    Please note my email address changes periodically to avoid spam.
    It is always of the form: month-year@domain. Hitting reply will work
    for a couple of months only. Later set it manually.

  4. Re: Dual boot Windows XP and Solaris 10

    On Wed, 12 Apr 2006 01:11:58 +0100, Dave (from the UK) wrote:

    > Dave Uhring wrote:


    >> I don't know about the 3/06 release of Solaris x86 but every previous
    >> release clobbered the partition table, not the other OSs installed on the
    >> disk. Solaris just does not comply with the usual LBA-Large CHS settings
    >> of 255 heads and 63 sectors/head.

    >
    > I suspect you are right, as when I changed the active partition to the one I
    > thought had XP on, there was a an error on rebooting something like
    >
    > BAD PBR
    > PBR = primary boot record.
    >
    > http://forum.sun.com/jive/thread.jsp...6418&tstart=75
    >
    >> Repair your partition table after installation of Solaris and it should
    >> work properly. Use Linux fdisk from a bootable Linux CD to do this.

    >
    > But there are plenty of references to installing Windoze and Solaris without
    > using Linux. I must admit, I am a bit confused.


    Well, I have been multibooting Solaris, Windows, Linux and various BSDs
    for the last 6 1/2 years. As I have always used the Linux loader lilo my
    repair of the partition table was always done with Linux fdisk.

    >> C: and D: have no meaning whatsoever, even in the Windows world. All of
    >> those partitions must be DOS primary partitions.
    >>

    >
    > That was what the XP installation program said - I'm basically quoting from
    > that, although I have rounded the sizes a bit.


    As usual with Windows what is reported is meaningless.

    >> You have lost part of your innermost cylinder because of a defective
    >> partition table tool.

    >
    > Em, so it is likely I am going to die again.


    Not necessarily. Ordinarily that odd partition is the innermost cylinder
    on the drive and has no effect on the rest of the drive.

    > As I write, XP has been installed again and Solaris is in the process of being
    > installed. The Solaris install seems:
    >
    > disk Type start cylinder end cylinder
    > c2t0d0 Unknown 0 3187 preserve
    > c2t0d0 unknown 3187 5736 delete
    > c2t0d0 DOSEXTLBA 3187 4462 add


    Well, that is certainly uninformative, unless DOSEXTLBA means that
    partition is an extended partition and probably unavailable to Solaris.

    > No idea what will happen here.


    Nor I. But you may be able to recover after properly fixing the partition
    table.

    >> Use a proper tool (Linux fdisk) to create the partition table *before* any
    >> OS installation and use the same tool after installation to fix the
    >> partition table. Linux fdisk does not touch the first 446 bytes of sector
    >> 0, which is the boot binary, or the last two bytes, just the 64 bytes
    >> which contain the partition table.
    >>

    >
    > Em,
    > a bit late for that now, as I'd already got XP installed and part of Solaris
    > before you replied. If this fails again, as I expect it will, I will look at
    > using Linux. But I am sure others have not needed to use Linux to do this.


    There may be other tools to fix the partition table after Solaris clobbers
    it. Since Linux fdisk is what I have available that is what I use.


  5. Re: Dual boot Windows XP and Solaris 10

    In article <443c3364@212.67.96.135>,
    Dave (from the UK) wrote:
    [SNIP frequent tale of woe of the UNIX guru confronted with a peecee and XP...]

    It's simple. Ignore the crud about using Linux tools and so forth.

    Step 1. Install XP. When XP asks about the disk layout, delete all
    partitions and create the 25Gb NTFS partition ONLY. Complete the XP
    install.

    Step 2. Install S10. Tell it to use 35Gb of the free space. Complete
    the install of S10.

    Step 3. Boot to XP. Use the disk manager to create the 10Gb FAT-32
    partition.

    Step 4. Boot to S10, do the magic to mount the FAT-32 partition.

    I'm at work at the moment, and SWMBO has the laptop with this
    configuration at the moment (hers is busted), so I can't replicate the
    exact strings and so on, but the above 4 steps are how I set it up,
    just different partition sizes and the FAT-32 was a logical partition
    inside an extended partition.

    Cheers,
    Gary B-)

    --
    --

    Speaking strictly for myself.

  6. Re: Dual boot Windows XP and Solaris 10

    Another user wrote:
    > In article <443c3364@212.67.96.135>,
    > Dave (from the UK) wrote:
    > [SNIP frequent tale of woe of the UNIX guru confronted with a peecee and XP...]


    I don't know about a guru!!

    > It's simple. Ignore the crud about using Linux tools and so forth.
    >
    > Step 1. Install XP. When XP asks about the disk layout, delete all
    > partitions and create the 25Gb NTFS partition ONLY. Complete the XP
    > install.
    >


    Hi,

    By the time I see your post (this morning), I'd already set XP running and
    created two partitions with the XP installer, not the one you said.

    I had also installed XP on the first one (25 GB).

    > Step 2. Install S10. Tell it to use 35Gb of the free space. Complete
    > the install of S10.


    I did that, but told it to use the partition I'd already created with XP's
    installer. (Again, this was done before I see your message).

    What is worrying me a bit is that the Solaris installer seems to think the first
    ends on cylinder 3187 and the second one starts there. I thought one needed to
    start the second partition on the next cylinder, not the same one.

    This is what Solaris the Solaris installation program thought.

    disk Type start_cylinder end_cylinder
    c2t0d0 Unknown 0 3187 preserve
    c2t0d0 unknown 3187 5736 delete
    c2t0d0 DOSEXTLBA 3187 4462 add

    > Step 3. Boot to XP. Use the disk manager to create the 10Gb FAT-32
    > partition.
    >


    Yippee, this time the Solaris installer has *not* overwritten XP. When the
    machine was rebooted, the grub installer gave me the choice of Winblows or Solaris.

    I've created the 10 GB FAT32 inside of XP - that now appears as D: in XP.

    > Step 4. Boot to S10, do the magic to mount the FAT-32 partition.
    >


    Took me a while, but I found eventually, thanks to

    http://www.unixguide.net/sun/x86faq/9.9.shtml

    the magic command was

    # mount -F pcfs /dev/dsk/c2t0d0p3:1 /mnt/d

    (That needs changing a bit for ATA disks, but it works for my SCSI one.)

    I'm not going to spend much time on this now, as I have a new Opteron
    motherboard which I had to return as it did not power up USB devices. Hopefully
    I'll get a replacement soon and will install this properly on a larger SATA disk.

    Thanks for your help. I seem to be there, although I am a bit concerned about
    the fact that the start cylinder for one partition is the end one for another.


    --
    Dave K MCSE.

    MCSE = Minefield Consultant and Solitaire Expert.

    Please note my email address changes periodically to avoid spam.
    It is always of the form: month-year@domain. Hitting reply will work
    for a couple of months only. Later set it manually.

  7. Re: Dual boot Windows XP and Solaris 10

    On Tue, 11 Apr 2006 18:31:26 -0500, Dave Uhring wrote:
    > On Tue, 11 Apr 2006 23:53:23 +0100, Dave (from the UK) wrote:
    >
    >> I just installed XP, then Solaris, but succeeded in wiping out XP with the
    >> Solaris install - perhaps not such a bad idea!! I'm not quite sure what I
    >> managed to do.

    >
    > I don't know about the 3/06 release of Solaris x86 but every previous
    > release clobbered the partition table, not the other OSs installed on the
    > disk. Solaris just does not comply with the usual LBA-Large CHS settings
    > of 255 heads and 63 sectors/head.
    >
    > Repair your partition table after installation of Solaris and it should
    > work properly. Use Linux fdisk from a bootable Linux CD to do this.


    Whilst this is true, this is largely irrelevant with modern hard drives.
    The OP wanted to make partitions that all exceed the CHS limits, so in
    this case, the only values that won't be maxed out are those of the
    start of the first partition.

    Also, there's no need to boot Linux any more. Just download my partition
    editor - pfdisk. It (touch wood) can restore CHS values from LBA ones.

    A bientot
    Paul
    --
    Paul Floyd http://paulf.free.fr (for what it's worth)
    Surgery: ennobled Gerald.

  8. Re: Dual boot Windows XP and Solaris 10

    On Thu, 13 Apr 2006 18:48:57 +0000, Paul Floyd wrote:

    > On Tue, 11 Apr 2006 18:31:26 -0500, Dave Uhring wrote:


    >> I don't know about the 3/06 release of Solaris x86 but every previous
    >> release clobbered the partition table, not the other OSs installed on the
    >> disk. Solaris just does not comply with the usual LBA-Large CHS settings
    >> of 255 heads and 63 sectors/head.
    >>
    >> Repair your partition table after installation of Solaris and it should
    >> work properly. Use Linux fdisk from a bootable Linux CD to do this.

    >
    > Whilst this is true, this is largely irrelevant with modern hard drives.
    > The OP wanted to make partitions that all exceed the CHS limits, so in
    > this case, the only values that won't be maxed out are those of the
    > start of the first partition.


    I have Solaris 10 x86 installed on the second partition of my primary IDE
    drive. The installation corrupted the partition table entries for *each*
    adjoining partition in addition to the Solaris partition.

    > Also, there's no need to boot Linux any more. Just download my partition
    > editor - pfdisk. It (touch wood) can restore CHS values from LBA ones.


    Since I run Linux on that machine and use lilo as my multi-boot loader the
    partition table repair has now become almost trivial.


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