ANN: /dev/recycle project - Solaris

This is a discussion on ANN: /dev/recycle project - Solaris ; Hi all, For many years Solaris has had a device, /dev/null, which is used as a bit bucket. Anything written to /dev/null is thrown away, and reads return EOF. Another device exists, /dev/zero, which is similar except that it returns ...

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Thread: ANN: /dev/recycle project

  1. ANN: /dev/recycle project

    Hi all,

    For many years Solaris has had a device, /dev/null, which is used
    as a bit bucket. Anything written to /dev/null is thrown away, and
    reads return EOF. Another device exists, /dev/zero, which is similar
    except that it returns an endless stream of 0 bytes when read.

    I think that this is wasteful, /dev/null especially so. So with a
    nod of inspiration to Sun's environmentally friendly UltraSPARC T1
    processor and T1000 and T2000 servers, I am pleased to announce an
    OpenSolaris project to implement /dev/recycle, sponsored in part by
    GreenPeace.

    The idea of this device is simple: rather than simply discarding
    unwanted bytes like /dev/null, data written to /dev/recycle is stored
    for later recycling: reads from /dev/recycle will be satisfied from
    this pool. (When the Trusted Extensions to Solaris are used, there
    is one recycling depot for each MAC label. Data with a given MAC label
    can only be read or written by a process at the same label.)

    I"ve done some benchmarking, and compared to using /dev/null, using
    /dev/recycle will result in huge byte savings: on the order of
    terabytes per year. Bytes are a finite resource, so it just makes
    sense to recycle them where possible (software engineers have long
    appreciated the benefits of recycled--aka reusable--code).

    I hear that the Mustang (Java 6) team is planning to replace Java's
    garbage collector with something that uses /dev/recycle. Given that
    Java currently performs automatic garbage collection, moving to the
    practice of of automatic recycling collection leveraging /dev/recycle
    will result in considerable byte savings, which is a Good Thing.

    Please join the eco-device community on www.opensolaris.org for more
    details.

    See you there,

    --
    Avril Dummkopf

  2. Re: ANN: /dev/recycle project

    Avril Dummkopf wrote:

    > The idea of this device is simple: rather than simply discarding
    > unwanted bytes like /dev/null, data written to /dev/recycle is stored
    > for later recycling: reads from /dev/recycle will be satisfied from
    > this pool.


    Sounds good! But there might be data corruption if you mix ascii and
    binary data in the same bucket. How about making instead
    /dev/recycle/ascii, /dev/recycle/binary, etc

    You could for example send postscript print jobs to /dev/recycle/ascii
    where they can be recycled easily. Imagine all the trees that it would
    save!

  3. Re: ANN: /dev/recycle project

    On Sat, 01 Apr 2006 16:53:42 GMT, Avril Dummkopf
    wrote:

    >Hi all,
    >
    >For many years Solaris has had a device, /dev/null, which is used
    >as a bit bucket. Anything written to /dev/null is thrown away, and
    >reads return EOF. Another device exists, /dev/zero, which is similar
    >except that it returns an endless stream of 0 bytes when read.
    >
    >I think that this is wasteful, /dev/null especially so. So with a
    >nod of inspiration to Sun's environmentally friendly UltraSPARC T1
    >processor and T1000 and T2000 servers, I am pleased to announce an
    >OpenSolaris project to implement /dev/recycle, sponsored in part by
    >GreenPeace.
    >
    >The idea of this device is simple: rather than simply discarding
    >unwanted bytes like /dev/null, data written to /dev/recycle is stored
    >for later recycling: reads from /dev/recycle will be satisfied from
    >this pool. (When the Trusted Extensions to Solaris are used, there
    >is one recycling depot for each MAC label. Data with a given MAC label
    >can only be read or written by a process at the same label.)
    >
    >I"ve done some benchmarking, and compared to using /dev/null, using
    >/dev/recycle will result in huge byte savings: on the order of
    >terabytes per year. Bytes are a finite resource, so it just makes
    >sense to recycle them where possible (software engineers have long
    >appreciated the benefits of recycled--aka reusable--code).
    >
    >I hear that the Mustang (Java 6) team is planning to replace Java's
    >garbage collector with something that uses /dev/recycle. Given that
    >Java currently performs automatic garbage collection, moving to the
    >practice of of automatic recycling collection leveraging /dev/recycle
    >will result in considerable byte savings, which is a Good Thing.
    >
    >Please join the eco-device community on www.opensolaris.org for more
    >details.
    >
    >See you there,


    Man, I was all fired up to join the eco-device community. I though we
    could meet every February 29. Then I noticed rite-group.com address.

    Very disturbing! Here I was all ready to nominate you for Solaris
    Mascot...


    Ever Foolish,
    Bill
    --
    William D Waddington
    william.waddington@beezmo.com
    "Even bugs...are unexpected signposts on
    the long road of creativity..." - Ken Burtch

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