The best notebook in market usable for multi Operating system - Solaris

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Thread: The best notebook in market usable for multi Operating system

  1. The best notebook in market usable for multi Operating system

    I need a notbook that may be easily usable with for windows and Solaris
    and also it should be the most reliable notebook in hardware the I may
    buy with good specifications and good hardware components(HardWorker) .

    I prefer to have 2 hard drive in it one for Solaris and the other for
    windows .
    Thanks


  2. Re: The best notebook in market usable for multi Operating system

    ehabaziz2001@gmail.com wrote:
    > I need a notbook that may be easily usable with for windows and Solaris
    > and also it should be the most reliable notebook in hardware the I may
    > buy with good specifications and good hardware components(HardWorker) .
    >
    > I prefer to have 2 hard drive in it one for Solaris and the other for
    > windows .
    > Thanks
    >


    You might want to look at them with ADM Turion mobile CPUs, as they are
    64-bit. That said, the overall consensus of reviews seems to be the CPUs
    are a bit more power hungry than the Intel mobile ones.

    Rich Teer said here the other day that several of the Solaris kernel
    developers use Acer Ferrari. They seem quite nice, but the are not cheap.

    I know there is an HP Pavilion with dual 100 GB hard drives and a AMD
    Turion processor. I don't know the model number. I was looking at the HP
    Pavilion dv5049EA, which is a pretty good spec, but the 3D graphics
    performance is poor, but I personally don't care for games. I'll
    probably go for that one.

    I'd be interested in what you do get, as I'm having much the same
    thoughts myself just now.

    --
    Dave K

    Minefield Consultant and Solitaire Expert (MCSE).

    Please note my email address changes periodically to avoid spam.
    It is always of the form: month-year@domain. Hitting reply will work
    for a couple of months only. Later set it manually.

  3. Re: The best notebook in market usable for multi Operating system

    ehabaziz2001@gmail.com wrote:

    > I need a notbook that may be easily usable with for windows and Solaris
    > and also it should be the most reliable notebook in hardware the I may
    > buy with good specifications and good hardware components(HardWorker) .
    >
    > I prefer to have 2 hard drive in it one for Solaris and the other for
    > windows .
    > Thanks
    >


    Windows should just work. Solaris may or may not work with
    the various hardware components in many notebooks. I've
    had reasonable experience with various IBM ThinkPads (now
    Lenovo) but many people have had reasonable experience with
    a variety of machines. For example, see the Solaris X86 laptop
    page:

    http://bolthole.com/solaris/x86-laptops.html

    If you need hardware accelerated OpenGL on Solaris and a
    supported video adapter, you probably want a Nvida Quadro
    FX series GPU which limits your choice. If you want 64-bit,
    you need an 64-bit AMD CPU (unless you get a "laptop" with
    a desktop Intel EMT processor). The AMD Turion is probably
    the way to go for 64-bit in a notebook although some vendors
    sell desktop AMD CPUs in "notebook" systems. I expect the battery
    life for such systems is poor :-)

    I don't need HW OpenGL and a 32-bit CPU is adequate for
    my needs. I like a high resolution display and a reasonably
    light machine so I have a T43p from Lenovo. It (mostly) works
    with Solaris Express (Nevada). I had some issues with the GA
    version of Solaris 10 (USB not working, had download an ethernet
    driver, and so on). I have windows XP on the supplied drive and
    Solaris (nevada b30) on a 2nd hard drive which goes in place of
    the provided DVD burner in an adapter. I use System Commander to
    select the OS to boot (Grub might work but I don't know that for
    a fact). I use a Plextor USB/2 connected DVD-R as the install
    drive. Video is a FireGL V3200 which works with the xorg driver.
    Audio works, ethernet works, wifi works with the iwi driver (either
    the original or newer version), Cardbus works with the Cardbus
    driver, Cardbus slots in the docking station work, and so on.
    The system has both a pointing stick and a trackpad and both work.

    However, some setup after the install is required and that may
    not be obvious to a novice to Solaris. The display is a 1600x1200
    15" panel with normal 4/3 aspect but it is bright and very nice.
    Some T43p models are available with a 1400x1050 14" display - I
    expect (but don't know for certain) that they would also work.

    I recommend lots of RAM and a fast (7200 RPM) disk for Solaris.
    Note that things like suspend and hibernate do not work with
    Solaris so you may also want a machine with a fairly large
    battery if you need to run without AC for any period of time.

    Stuart

  4. Re: The best notebook in market usable for multi Operating system

    ehabaziz2001@gmail.com wrote:
    > I need a notbook that may be easily usable with for windows and Solaris
    > and also it should be the most reliable notebook in hardware the I may
    > buy with good specifications and good hardware components(HardWorker) .
    >
    > I prefer to have 2 hard drive in it one for Solaris and the other for
    > windows .
    > Thanks
    >

    From all of the Sun blogs (http://blogs.sun.com/roller/main.do) I've
    read it seems that Sun has standardized on the Acer Ferrari as their
    notebook of choice to develop cross platform for and would be my target
    notebook for Solaris/Windows use.

  5. Re: The best notebook in market usable for multi Operating system

    THere's now the beginnings of a Laptop section on BigAdmin:

    http://www.sun.com/bigadmin/features...resources.html

    There's also specific info about the Acer Ferrari 4000 with a single-core
    AMD64 Turion chip.

    We're waiting for a dual-core version to appear.



    KJ wrote:
    > ehabaziz2001@gmail.com wrote:
    >> I need a notbook that may be easily usable with for windows and Solaris
    >> and also it should be the most reliable notebook in hardware the I may
    >> buy with good specifications and good hardware components(HardWorker) .
    >>
    >> I prefer to have 2 hard drive in it one for Solaris and the other for
    >> windows .
    >> Thanks
    >>

    > From all of the Sun blogs (http://blogs.sun.com/roller/main.do) I've
    > read it seems that Sun has standardized on the Acer Ferrari as their
    > notebook of choice to develop cross platform for and would be my target
    > notebook for Solaris/Windows use.



    --
    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Richard Friedman http://blogs.sun.com/rchrd
    Oakland, CA
    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

  6. Re: The best notebook in market usable for multi Operating system

    What do you mean of We're waiting for a dual-core version to appear. ?
    Are you saying that I should wait until a hardware update happened to
    such model(Ferrari)


  7. Re: The best notebook in market usable for multi Operating system

    No. Many engineers at Sun are already using the single-core Acer Ferrari 4000.
    I have no idea when a dual-core will be available, so unless you really need
    dual-core, the 4000 is already a good choice.

    I meant "waiting for" in an ironic sense. The 4000 is already pretty heavy to
    lug around. And I guess one of the design concerns is heat dissipation (hot laps).
    But I'm not an expert on these things...

    However, if 64-bit is not a requirement, just about any of the current laptops
    are sufficient to run Solaris and Windows. You would want a large internal
    disk. The 4000 has a 100 GB disk. I don't know about any laptops with 2 disks.
    Are there any?

    You can also check the compatible hardware list on the sun.com website:

    http://www.sun.com/bigadmin/hcl/data...lts.page1.html




    ehabaziz2001@gmail.com wrote:
    > What do you mean of We're waiting for a dual-core version to appear. ?
    > Are you saying that I should wait until a hardware update happened to
    > such model(Ferrari)
    >



    --
    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Richard Friedman http://blogs.sun.com/rchrd
    Oakland, CA
    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

  8. Re: The best notebook in market usable for multi Operating system

    Alienware sells a dual core, dual disk laptop....

    http://alienware.com/product_detail_...de=SKU-DEFAULT

    - Bart


  9. Re: The best notebook in market usable for multi Operating system

    Egad! Fully outfitted, it's nearly $5K.
    That's a lot of bling to be carrying around!

    barts@smaalders.net wrote:
    > Alienware sells a dual core, dual disk laptop....
    >
    > http://alienware.com/product_detail_...de=SKU-DEFAULT
    >
    > - Bart
    >



    --
    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Richard Friedman http://blogs.sun.com/rchrd
    Oakland, CA
    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

  10. Re: The best notebook in market usable for multi Operating system

    Richard Friedman wrote:

    > However, if 64-bit is not a requirement, just about any of the current
    > laptops
    > are sufficient to run Solaris and Windows.



    It's hard to see much advantage of 64-bit on a laptop, given I have yet
    to see one which has sufficient RAM to make use of the larger address
    space.

    That said, I'd probably buy a 64-bit laptop, since Mathematica runs on
    the 64-bit version, but not on the 32-bit one.

    > You would want a large internal
    > disk. The 4000 has a 100 GB disk. I don't know about any laptops with 2
    > disks.
    > Are there any?


    I'm 99% sure I see an HP laptop with dual 100 GB disks - I think it was
    64-bit too, but are not sure about that. I see it in Micro Anvika in
    Tottenham Court Road less than a week ago.

    This 64-bit HP laptop

    http://www.johnlewis.com/Computing/C...7/Product.aspx

    seemed quite nice, and significantly less expensive than any Acer
    Ferrari with a 2 GHz processor. But the data sheet on the HP site says
    it runs at 1.6 GHz, so I am more than a bit confused, as the processor
    is a 2 GHz one.

    The HP also has a 2-year warranty (as does any computer bought from John
    Lewis). However, the graphics chip is not as good as on the Acer, but
    other than that, the HP seems to be better all around to me,

    But I accept there is probably a lot to be said for the Acer for Solaris
    if a lot of Sun employees are using it, which Rich Teer has said here.

    As of a few days ago I thought I was going to need a laptop urgently,
    but that is not so. Therefore I will not be buying one just now, but I
    am going to keep an eye on this.

    --
    Dave K

    Minefield Consultant and Solitaire Expert (MCSE).

    Please note my email address changes periodically to avoid spam.
    It is always of the form: month-year@domain. Hitting reply will work
    for a couple of months only. Later set it manually.

  11. Re: The best notebook in market usable for multi Operating system

    ehabaziz2001@gmail.com wrote:
    > I need a notbook that may be easily usable with for windows and Solaris
    > and also it should be the most reliable notebook in hardware the I may
    > buy with good specifications and good hardware components(HardWorker) .
    >
    > I prefer to have 2 hard drive in it one for Solaris and the other for
    > windows .
    > Thanks


    Personally I just bought the Windows laptop with my preferred
    ergonomics, invested $100 (US) in a VMware Workstation license, and run
    Solaris in a VM under Windows. The advantage of having them both
    available simultaneously, the simplicity of avoiding repartitioning and
    boot loaders and so on, and the ability to then scale out to Linux and
    FreeBSD and so on, all made that $100 a no-brainer for me.

    Also, I don't bother running X11 on the VM console. For me at least it's
    easier to use VNC or ssh to reach it from Windows. This allows me to
    start Solaris in the VM and then iconify/minimize it and from there I
    can pretend it's just another machine on the network, rather than
    dealing the "input grabbing" behavior of VMware.

    Just my 2 cents,
    HT

  12. Re: The best notebook in market usable for multi Operating system

    Richard Friedman wrote:
    > No. Many engineers at Sun are already using the single-core Acer Ferrari
    > 4000.
    > I have no idea when a dual-core will be available, so unless you really
    > need
    > dual-core, the 4000 is already a good choice.
    >
    > I meant "waiting for" in an ironic sense. The 4000 is already pretty
    > heavy to
    > lug around. And I guess one of the design concerns is heat dissipation
    > (hot laps).
    > But I'm not an expert on these things...
    >
    > However, if 64-bit is not a requirement, just about any of the current
    > laptops
    > are sufficient to run Solaris and Windows. You would want a large internal
    > disk. The 4000 has a 100 GB disk. I don't know about any laptops with 2
    > disks.
    > Are there any?
    >

    Sager do:

    http://www.sagernotebook.com/pages/n...9750&SubType=V

    I hear these work well with Solaris and they have nVidia 7800GTX
    graphics as well.

    --
    Ian Collins.

  13. Re: The best notebook in market usable for multi Operating system

    "Dave (from the UK)" writes:

    >It's hard to see much advantage of 64-bit on a laptop, given I have yet
    >to see one which has sufficient RAM to make use of the larger address
    >space.


    ZFS likes the virtual memory space it gets.

    It also allows for the full 4GB of address space in 32 bit apps
    (as opposed to 3GB or less) and, of course, lare address space.


    >That said, I'd probably buy a 64-bit laptop, since Mathematica runs on
    >the 64-bit version, but not on the 32-bit one.


    Another good reason, then .../

    Casper
    --
    Expressed in this posting are my opinions. They are in no way related
    to opinions held by my employer, Sun Microsystems.
    Statements on Sun products included here are not gospel and may
    be fiction rather than truth.

  14. Re: The best notebook in market usable for multi Operating system

    On Mon, 20 Feb 2006, Dave (from the UK) wrote:

    > It's hard to see much advantage of 64-bit on a laptop, given I have yet to see
    > one which has sufficient RAM to make use of the larger address space.


    The extra address space isn't the only reason to get a 64-bit AMD laptop:
    in 64-bit mode, more registers are available, which can give a significant
    performance increase.

    > That said, I'd probably buy a 64-bit laptop, since Mathematica runs on the
    > 64-bit version, but not on the 32-bit one.


    That's another good reason. :-)

    > seemed quite nice, and significantly less expensive than any Acer Ferrari with
    > a 2 GHz processor. But the data sheet on the HP site says it runs at 1.6 GHz,
    > so I am more than a bit confused, as the processor is a 2 GHz one.


    They might run it slower for power/cooling reasons.

    > But I accept there is probably a lot to be said for the Acer for Solaris if a
    > lot of Sun employees are using it, which Rich Teer has said here.


    Yep; FWIW, I've not played very much with the Ferrari 4000 series, but I have
    a fully loaded 3400. It's currently running build 33 of Nevada (the latest)
    and working just fine. It was very satisfactory to watch the CoolThreads and
    Galaxy promo videos on Sun's web site at last!

    --
    Rich Teer, SCNA, SCSA, OpenSolaris CAB member

    President,
    Rite Online Inc.

    Voice: +1 (250) 979-1638
    URL: http://www.rite-group.com/rich

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