mount etx3 _OR_ newfs a partition - Solaris

This is a discussion on mount etx3 _OR_ newfs a partition - Solaris ; I've 4 partitions on my laptop disk as shown below. I've realised that I will never run any Linux on it (must run XP sometimes) and now I want the 1/4 of the disk that I've set aside for the ...

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Thread: mount etx3 _OR_ newfs a partition

  1. mount etx3 _OR_ newfs a partition

    I've 4 partitions on my laptop disk as shown below. I've realised that
    I will never run any Linux on it
    (must run XP sometimes) and now I want the 1/4 of the disk that I've
    set aside for the Pinguin OS
    to be available from Solaris. So, is it possible to mount an ext3 from
    Solaris yet? Or can I make
    newfs on it somehow and then mount it. I'm running Nevada_26 on a
    Ferrari 3400...

    Total disk size is 38765 cylinders
    Cylinder size is 4032 (512 byte) blocks

    Cylinders
    Partition Status Type Start End
    Length %
    ========= ====== ======== ==== ===== === ======
    ===
    1 Diagnostic 0
    1525 1526 4
    2 Active Ext Win95 1526 20101
    18576 48
    3 Linux native 20101 29432
    9332 24
    4 Solaris2 29433
    38761 9329 24

    Backup/restore is not an option as I'm too afraid to break something
    (must test out g4u a bit more
    first...)

    Cheers,

    /Thommy M.


  2. Re: mount etx3 _OR_ newfs a partition

    Thommy M. wrote:
    > I've 4 partitions on my laptop disk as shown below. I've realised that
    > I will never run any Linux on it
    > (must run XP sometimes) and now I want the 1/4 of the disk that I've
    > set aside for the Pinguin OS
    > to be available from Solaris. So, is it possible to mount an ext3 from
    > Solaris yet? Or can I make
    > newfs on it somehow and then mount it. I'm running Nevada_26 on a
    > Ferrari 3400...
    >
    > Total disk size is 38765 cylinders
    > Cylinder size is 4032 (512 byte) blocks
    >
    > Cylinders
    > Partition Status Type Start End
    > Length %
    > ========= ====== ======== ==== ===== === ======
    > ===
    > 1 Diagnostic 0
    > 1525 1526 4
    > 2 Active Ext Win95 1526 20101
    > 18576 48
    > 3 Linux native 20101 29432
    > 9332 24
    > 4 Solaris2 29433
    > 38761 9329 24
    >
    > Backup/restore is not an option as I'm too afraid to break something
    > (must test out g4u a bit more
    > first...)
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > /Thommy M.
    >



    Maybe you should take a look at the FAQ - especially point (9.24). "Can
    I access Linux (ext2fs) partitions from Solaris?"

    http://www.sun.drydog.com/faq/9.html

    HTH,
    Tom

  3. Re: mount etx3 _OR_ newfs a partition

    > Maybe you should take a look at the FAQ - especially point (9.24). "Can
    > I access Linux (ext2fs) partitions from Solaris?"
    >
    > http://www.sun.drydog.com/faq/9.html


    Well, it does not solve my little problem fully.
    1. Only gives me read access
    2. Only works in 32-bit

    I realised another issue. If I don't have any filsystem at all there
    yet, how can I then
    make a UFS on the partition?

    I thought of something like this:


    # mkfile -n 9332b /var/tmp/9332b
    # lofiadm -a /var/tmp/9332b
    # newfs /dev/rlofi/1
    # dd -i /var/tmp/9332b -o /dev/rdsk/c1d0p3
    # mount /dev/dsk/c1d0p3 /mnt

    Am I totally wrong or?


  4. Re: mount etx3 _OR_ newfs a partition

    Thommy M. wrote:
    >> Maybe you should take a look at the FAQ - especially point (9.24). "Can
    >> I access Linux (ext2fs) partitions from Solaris?"
    >>
    >> http://www.sun.drydog.com/faq/9.html

    >
    > Well, it does not solve my little problem fully.
    > 1. Only gives me read access
    > 2. Only works in 32-bit
    >
    > I realised another issue. If I don't have any filsystem at all there
    > yet, how can I then
    > make a UFS on the partition?
    >
    > I thought of something like this:
    >
    >
    > # mkfile -n 9332b /var/tmp/9332b
    > # lofiadm -a /var/tmp/9332b
    > # newfs /dev/rlofi/1
    > # dd -i /var/tmp/9332b -o /dev/rdsk/c1d0p3
    > # mount /dev/dsk/c1d0p3 /mnt
    >
    > Am I totally wrong or?
    >


    I don't know what you want to achieve with this command sequence. But
    one thing is sure: if you do this, you wipe out /dev/dsk/c1d0p3 and
    probably get an empty filesystem mounted under /mnt.

    You should take a look at the "System Administration Guide: Devices and
    File Systems" guide: http://docs.sun.com/app/docs/doc/817-5093

    I cannot tell you what the best way is to get your data off the
    partition, without doing a backup. I would strongly recommend doing a
    backup, repartition the disk, and restore from backup.

    Additionally, I would like to point out that harddisks die occasionally.
    So it is always a good idea to have a current backup. An even better
    idea is to have a mirror. At least for /home - even at home...

    Good luck!

    Tom

  5. Re: mount etx3 _OR_ newfs a partition

    On Wed, 15 Feb 2006, Thommy M. wrote:

    > I've 4 partitions on my laptop disk as shown below. I've realised that
    > I will never run any Linux on it


    Good choice!

    > newfs on it somehow and then mount it. I'm running Nevada_26 on a
    > Ferrari 3400...


    Nice machine (I have one too). BTW, build 33 is out now, so you might
    want to upgrade: it includes ZFS and RealPlayer.

    > Backup/restore is not an option as I'm too afraid to break something
    > (must test out g4u a bit more
    > first...)


    If you don't care about the data on the Linux partition, just use fdisk
    to mark it as a Solaris2 partition, then newfs it and mount from your
    existing Solaris installation.

    HTH,

    --
    Rich Teer, SCNA, SCSA, OpenSolaris CAB member

    President,
    Rite Online Inc.

    Voice: +1 (250) 979-1638
    URL: http://www.rite-group.com/rich

  6. Re: mount etx3 _OR_ newfs a partition

    > If you don't care about the data on the Linux partition, just use fdisk
    > to mark it as a Solaris2 partition, then newfs it and mount from your
    > existing Solaris installation.


    OK, but what device do I newfs? I don't trust myself to figure out if
    it is c1d0p3 or (no, can't be as newfs only works on slices, or?) or is
    it c1d0???

    The partition/slices way in Solaris is a mess. Haven't seen any
    trustable doc on that
    yet...


  7. Re: mount etx3 _OR_ newfs a partition

    On 15 Feb 2006 01:21:54 -0800, Thommy M. wrote:
    > I've 4 partitions on my laptop disk as shown below. I've realised that
    > I will never run any Linux on it
    > (must run XP sometimes) and now I want the 1/4 of the disk that I've
    > set aside for the Pinguin OS
    > to be available from Solaris. So, is it possible to mount an ext3 from
    > Solaris yet? Or can I make
    > newfs on it somehow and then mount it. I'm running Nevada_26 on a
    > Ferrari 3400...
    >
    > Total disk size is 38765 cylinders
    > Cylinder size is 4032 (512 byte) blocks
    >

    Cylinders
    Partition Status Type Start End Length %
    ========= ====== ======== ==== ===== === ====== ===
    1 Diagnostic 0 1525 1526 4
    2 Active Ext Win95 1526 20101 18576 48
    3 Linux native 20101 29432 9332 24
    4 Solaris2 29433 38761 9329 24

    > Backup/restore is not an option as I'm too afraid to break something
    > (must test out g4u a bit more
    > first...)


    Hmm. One possibility would be to use UDFS, but from what I've read,
    performance is slow, and despite the U in the name, cross platform
    interoperability isn't too great.

    There's not much likelihood of the ext2/3 driver supporting writing in
    the near future (at least, not by my efforts). FYI though, I have
    compiled the source for x86, x64, SPARC and SPARC v9, though only the
    first of those 4 do I know to work at all.

    Probably what I'd do is

    1) make a backup of the Solaris UFS partition (I use Ghost)
    2) delete both the ext3 and Solaris UFS partitions
    3) use Ghost to restore the Solaris partition
    4) edit the partition table so that P3 uses up the space at the end of
    the disk
    5) use format and growfs to grow one or more Solaris slices

    (see http://paulf.free.fr/solarisx86_growfs.html for an example).

    If you don't have Ghost, then you might be able to achieve the same with
    dd, i.e., somehting like
    a) boot from Solaris install CD
    b) get a command prompt
    c) dd if=/dev/rdsk/c0d0p4 of=/dev/rdsk/c0d0p3

    then you'd have to do some partition table meddling: change the type of
    P3 to be Solaris UFS, and extend it to use all of the disk, and zero out
    P4. Then use format/growfs as in step 5 above.

    However, unless you have a lot of data and stuff installed, probably the
    easiest thing is to just backup your home directory and reinstall
    Solaris, then restore your home directory and any apps that you had
    installed.

    A bientot
    Paul
    --
    Paul Floyd http://paulf.free.fr (for what it's worth)
    Surgery: ennobled Gerald.

  8. Re: mount etx3 _OR_ newfs a partition

    In article <1140033849.825825.236780@g43g2000cwa.googlegroups. com>,
    "Thommy M." writes:
    >> If you don't care about the data on the Linux partition, just use fdisk
    >> to mark it as a Solaris2 partition, then newfs it and mount from your
    >> existing Solaris installation.


    Pick a partition type you would never use, not Solaris or Solaris2
    which might cause confusion as there will be no VToC in the partition.

    > OK, but what device do I newfs? I don't trust myself to figure out if
    > it is c1d0p3 or (no, can't be as newfs only works on slices, or?) or is
    > it c1d0???


    It works if you grab the /usr/lib/fs/ufs/mkfs from a Solaris x86 2.6
    system. Unfortunately, the command line parsing was broken in Solaris 7
    and still is.

    > The partition/slices way in Solaris is a mess. Haven't seen any
    > trustable doc on that
    > yet...


    It works as required by the fdisk partitioning spec, as does just
    about every other x86 operating system except Linux.

    --
    Andrew Gabriel

  9. Re: mount etx3 _OR_ newfs a partition

    >> The partition/slices way in Solaris is a mess. Haven't seen any
    >> trustable doc on that
    >> yet...

    >
    > It works as required by the fdisk partitioning spec, as does just
    > about every other x86 operating system except Linux.


    I'm sure it follows the specs, what I whine about is the docs. There
    are far
    too many that cannot keep the line. It's not all that easy for us
    SPARC/OBP
    guys to follow the PC/fdisk style. We are ot used to partitions...


  10. Re: mount etx3 _OR_ newfs a partition

    I think I go the backup/restore way. Must get fluent on that anyway.
    g4u seems resonable easy to understand I think. And its time to move up
    from b26 to b33...

    But, I still don't trust any documantation on this topic. It's a mix of
    IDE, SCSI, partitions, slices
    BIOS etc. that makes me really nervous...
    http://multiboot.solaris-x86.org/ is the best, but not really there
    (yet). It also seems a bit outdated.


  11. Re: mount etx3 _OR_ newfs a partition

    Thommy M. wrote:
    >> Maybe you should take a look at the FAQ - especially point (9.24). "Can
    >> I access Linux (ext2fs) partitions from Solaris?"
    >>
    >> http://www.sun.drydog.com/faq/9.html

    >
    > Well, it does not solve my little problem fully.
    > 1. Only gives me read access
    > 2. Only works in 32-bit
    >
    > I realised another issue. If I don't have any filsystem at all there
    > yet, how can I then
    > make a UFS on the partition?
    >
    > I thought of something like this:
    >
    >
    > # mkfile -n 9332b /var/tmp/9332b
    > # lofiadm -a /var/tmp/9332b
    > # newfs /dev/rlofi/1
    > # dd -i /var/tmp/9332b -o /dev/rdsk/c1d0p3
    > # mount /dev/dsk/c1d0p3 /mnt
    >
    > Am I totally wrong or?


    This works fine, I've been using it since several years without problem.

    It allows me to have my data and home directory safely persist between Solaris
    reinstallations, and to have more than one Solaris distribution installed on the
    same disk sharing it.

    Just make sure the file you are creating isn't larger than the target partition.

    Also, increase the block size with the dd command to speed up the copy.

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