32 binaries ... - Solaris

This is a discussion on 32 binaries ... - Solaris ; Can anyone tell me why most of the binaries on solaris 10 x86 (amd64) are 32 bits ? Doesnt this defeat the purpose, somewhat, of a 64 bit kernel and 64bit capable OS ? Cheers, Bards....

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: 32 binaries ...

  1. 32 binaries ...

    Can anyone tell me why most of the binaries on solaris 10 x86 (amd64)
    are 32 bits ? Doesnt this defeat the purpose, somewhat, of a 64 bit
    kernel and 64bit capable OS ?

    Cheers,


    Bards.

  2. Re: 32 binaries ...

    bards1888 wrote:
    > Can anyone tell me why most of the binaries on solaris 10 x86 (amd64)
    > are 32 bits ? Doesnt this defeat the purpose, somewhat, of a 64 bit
    > kernel and 64bit capable OS ?


    Nope. A "32 bit" program is still capable of processing files > 2Gb in
    size and few programs require more than 32 bit address ranges.

    --
    Geoff Lane

    I'm not lost! I'm locationally challenged.

  3. Re: 32 binaries ...


    bards1888 wrote:
    > Can anyone tell me why most of the binaries on solaris 10 x86 (amd64)
    > are 32 bits ? Doesnt this defeat the purpose, somewhat, of a 64 bit
    > kernel and 64bit capable OS ?


    SOme OS:es like Linux and FreeBSD have 64 bit utility binaries

    beacause the implementors have not yet solved the challenge of
    having
    32 bit and 64 bit libraries and execution environments coexist.
    This was solved 10 years ago on solaris 7 ( Sparc)

    There is no point in using 64 bit instructions and operations for
    small
    program and utilities , it actually slows things down.

    Its the Software systems ( like Oracle ) that need more than
    4 GB virtual memory that benefit from 64 bit adress space.

    As the Kernel is 64 bit it can use the the 64 bit
    features of the AMD64 architecture.

    //Lars


  4. Re: 32 binaries ...

    tunla wrote:
    > There is no point in using 64 bit instructions and operations for small
    > program and utilities , it actually slows things down.


    True for SPARC, but not for x86/amd64. Because of the larger register set
    (16 instead of 8) almost any program does run faster compiled as 64 bit
    compared to 32 bit. Speedup is usual in the range from 5% - 30%.

    For shell scripts you usually don't notice the difference, because the
    running time is dominated by fork/exec.

    --
    Daniel

+ Reply to Thread