A blog is a website with a reverse chronological navigation structure for the articles. It implies certain expectations on both sides of the screen, i.e. the blog author and the dear reader. The author commits to provide more or less frequent articles about more or less well defined areas. The reader is invited to browse, read, comment, and subscribe the feed. At best, a conversation emerges, and becomes part of the blogosphere.

Good content and style is key, but even the best content does not fly if the blog's usability is poor. That's why I am continuously improving various aspects of this virtual UX blog. Let me share today the top 7 consideration that drove me to the current design.


1) This is the end, now what?


No, it is not. It is just a catchy headline for my first point. A few users of the web might find the way to your blog. Some even start reading, but most of them just skim the page. The game is on. Either they hit BACK in a couple of seconds and are gone forever, or they spend a few moments more to skim, scroll, and read. Now ask yourself what happens if the reader reaches the end of the page. What links do you provide to keep the reader on your pages?


The default themes from Apache Roller and a few additional themes from Sun simply don't care. The reader is left alone in the middle of nowhere, and the chance is high that he clicks BACK because he has obviously reached a dead end.

Simple solution: Provide pagination both on the top and at the bottom of the page. In Roller you can add the following lines to the weblog and permalink templates in order to get a simple " Previous | Main | Next " navigation element:


#set($pager = $model.getWeblogEntriesPager())
#showNextPrevEntriesControl($pager)






Related: Persuasives Web-Design. Jenseits von Usability und Konversion von Sebastian Deterding




2) Good Tags - Bad Tags


It is no secret that I am a fan of tagging. If done right, it has many advantages both for the author, as well as for the reader. On blogs they act like a fingerprint of the content. They provide a fast impression what the blog is about without the need to browse several pages. In addition, they are a second-level navigation. (The first level navigation on blogs is the implicit reverse chronological order of articles.) All this is so convincing to me that I display my tag cloud on a very prominent spot, top in the left column. And BTW without a heading, because it is pretty obvious that these are tags.

Over time you will develop a personal vocabulary of tags. And you also have to do some house-keeping on your tags, e.g. combine tags and retag older articles. Errors become obvious if you use the tag cloud also for yourself to navigate your blog. If the main tag cloud becomes too large, you should also increase the lower threshold when tags are shown.


I've written before about how to implement a tag cloud for a Roller blog.


Related: my tagged pages on tagging


3) The Look of the Link


to be continued in a moment...








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