Still can't network Linux and Windows - SMB

This is a discussion on Still can't network Linux and Windows - SMB ; Still trying crack the Linux-Windows SMB networking nut and it's driving me nuts: So far, I can: - ping both the Windows (XP Pro, Sp2) and Linux (CentOS 4.3, RHEL4 clone) by both hostname and network address, so no issues ...

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  1. Still can't network Linux and Windows

    Still trying crack the Linux-Windows SMB networking nut and it's driving
    me nuts:

    So far, I can:
    - ping both the Windows (XP Pro, Sp2) and Linux (CentOS 4.3, RHEL4
    clone) by both hostname and network address, so no issues with basic
    networking.

    - access the Windows shares and print to the Windows printer on the
    Linux box, so SMB (Samba) is working on the Linux side.

    - view both the Windows and Linux hosts in the "View Network Computers"
    boxes on the XP box, so the Windows box can "see" the Linux box.

    However, when I try to access the Linux shares on the Windows box, I
    get the following message:

    > \\Host4 is not accessible. You might not have permission to use this network resource. Contact the administrator of

    this server to find out if you have access permissions.
    >
    > The network path was not found.


    I know a major issue in networking Linux and Windows computers via SMB
    is the fact that Windows encrypts passwords while Linux does not.
    However, I believe I'm dealing with that in my smb.conf as given below:

    > [global]
    > workgroup = coryell
    > server string = CentOS 4.3
    > hosts deny = ALL
    > interfaces = eth0 l0
    > hosts allow = 127.0.0.1, 192.168.0.4, 192.168.0.1, 192.168.0.3
    >
    > printcap name = /etc/printcap
    > load printers = yes
    > printing = cups
    > cups options = raw
    >
    > log file = /var/log/samba/%m.log
    > max log size = 50
    >
    > encrypt passwords = yes
    > smb passwd file = /etc/samba/smbpasswd
    >
    > password level = 8
    > username level = 8
    >
    > username map = /etc/samba/smbusers
    >
    > socket options = TCP_NODELAY SO_RCVBUF=8192 SO_SNDBUF=8192
    >
    > remote announce = 192.168.0
    > os level = 75
    >
    > idmap uid = 16777216 - 33554431
    > idmap gid = 16777216 - 33554431
    > template shell = /bin/false
    > password server = None
    > winbind use default domain = no
    >
    > [homes]
    > comment = Home Directories
    > browseable = yes
    > writeable = yes
    > [home]
    > path = /home
    > writeable = yes
    > browseable = yes
    > guest ok = yes


    Any clues?






  2. Re: Still can't network Linux and Windows

    All sorts of weird stuff there that I would never put in a smb.conf,
    but whatever. Do you have the user-account you are trying to connect
    with in /etc/samba/smbpasswd? Look up the 'smbpasswd' command (man
    smbpasswd), in particular smbpasswd -a.

    'password level' is (?) unnecessary with encryption turned on
    'username level' is something you probably do not need, maybe the idmap
    stuff as well.

    In the utterly improbably case that this does not work,
    http://home.arcor.de/36bit/samba.html#4.13 should ;-)


  3. Re: Still can't network Linux and Windows

    On Sun, 21 May 2006 10:49:52 -0400, in comp.protocols.smb , Bruce
    Coryell wrote:

    >Still trying crack the Linux-Windows SMB networking nut and it's driving
    >me nuts:
    >
    >So far, I can:
    > - ping both the Windows (XP Pro, Sp2) and Linux (CentOS 4.3, RHEL4
    >clone) by both hostname and network address, so no issues with basic
    >networking.
    >
    > - access the Windows shares and print to the Windows printer on the
    >Linux box, so SMB (Samba) is working on the Linux side.
    >
    > - view both the Windows and Linux hosts in the "View Network Computers"
    >boxes on the XP box, so the Windows box can "see" the Linux box.
    >
    >However, when I try to access the Linux shares on the Windows box, I
    >get the following message:
    >
    >> \\Host4 is not accessible. You might not have permission to use this network resource. Contact the administrator of

    > this server to find out if you have access permissions.


    I discovered that my Samba box wouldn't share anything out unless I
    had a /tmp share. When I added that back in (naturally I'd deleted it
    from the default smb.conf...) everything started working. No idea why.
    >I know a major issue in networking Linux and Windows computers via

    SMB
    >is the fact that Windows encrypts passwords while Linux does not.


    Nah. thats not an issue.

    --
    Mark McIntyre

  4. Re: Still can't network Linux and Windows

    On Sun, 21 May 2006 10:49:52 -0400, Bruce Coryell wrote:

    > Still trying crack the Linux-Windows SMB networking nut and it's driving
    > me nuts:
    >
    > So far, I can:
    > - ping both the Windows (XP Pro, Sp2) and Linux (CentOS 4.3, RHEL4
    > clone) by both hostname and network address, so no issues with basic
    > networking.
    >
    > - access the Windows shares and print to the Windows printer on the
    > Linux box, so SMB (Samba) is working on the Linux side.
    >
    > - view both the Windows and Linux hosts in the "View Network Computers"
    > boxes on the XP box, so the Windows box can "see" the Linux box.
    >
    > However, when I try to access the Linux shares on the Windows box, I
    > get the following message:
    >
    >> \\Host4 is not accessible. You might not have permission to use this network resource. Contact the administrator of

    > this server to find out if you have access permissions.
    >>
    >> The network path was not found.

    >
    > I know a major issue in networking Linux and Windows computers via SMB
    > is the fact that Windows encrypts passwords while Linux does not.
    > However, I believe I'm dealing with that in my smb.conf as given below:
    >


    FWIW - there is a Samba Howto (at www.tldp.org) which is good for getting
    things going. Also, the entire contents of the O'Reilly Samba book is
    available free online from O'Reilly.


  5. Re: Still can't network Linux and Windows

    ray wrote:
    > On Sun, 21 May 2006 10:49:52 -0400, Bruce Coryell wrote:
    >
    >> Still trying crack the Linux-Windows SMB networking nut and it's
    >> driving me nuts:
    >>
    >> So far, I can:
    >> - ping both the Windows (XP Pro, Sp2) and Linux (CentOS 4.3, RHEL4
    >> clone) by both hostname and network address, so no issues with basic
    >> networking.
    >>
    >> - access the Windows shares and print to the Windows printer on the
    >> Linux box, so SMB (Samba) is working on the Linux side.
    >>
    >> - view both the Windows and Linux hosts in the "View Network
    >> Computers" boxes on the XP box, so the Windows box can "see" the
    >> Linux box.
    >>
    >> However, when I try to access the Linux shares on the Windows box,
    >> I get the following message:
    >>
    >>> \\Host4 is not accessible. You might not have permission to use
    >>> this network resource. Contact the administrator of

    >> this server to find out if you have access permissions.
    >>>
    >>> The network path was not found.

    >>
    >> I know a major issue in networking Linux and Windows computers via
    >> SMB is the fact that Windows encrypts passwords while Linux does not.
    >> However, I believe I'm dealing with that in my smb.conf as given
    >> below:
    >>

    >
    > FWIW - there is a Samba Howto (at www.tldp.org) which is good for
    > getting things going. Also, the entire contents of the O'Reilly Samba
    > book is available free online from O'Reilly.


    The claim is nonsense. Samba supports the older protocols for Win9x, which
    by default *did not* encrypt passwords, but has supported the better
    technologies almost since Microsoft started using them. The general weakness
    of SMB passwords is merely reveealed by Samba, not created by it.

    Newer techniques such Active Directory's use of an LDAP or even Kerberos
    back-end is also well supported, even better-supported by Samba, because
    Linux/UNIX based Kerberos didn't deliberately break themselves the way
    Microsoft did to disable non-Windows clients. None of that encourages or
    forces the use of unencrypted passwords.

    The Samba documentation, especailly the troubleshooting.html file, are
    wonderful for getting things working.



  6. Re: Still can't network Linux and Windows

    Just a couple of words on Encryption.

    All Windows versions starting with Win95B have password encryption
    turned on by default. The original Win95 needed a patch for that. I
    once saw a posting claiming even WfWg 3.11 would support encryption if
    it was turned on but have no idea of the veracity of *that* statement
    ;-)

    Samba 1.x versions had encryption turned off by default (this is from
    memory), Samba 2.x versions have it turned on by default. Having it
    turned on means that non-encrypted passwords are rejected. The default
    was configurable in both cases although I cannot imagine anyone turning
    it off nowadays.

    I think the Win95-98-ME line had a different encryption scheme to
    NT-2K-XP, although both versions (and Samba) can interact with both
    schemes. That is why each line in the smbpasswd file contains two
    separate passwords. The Win95-98-ME encryption is a lot weaker than
    the other.

    I can't remember when Samba first allowed encryption but it was before
    1.9.18p8 which is when I got started. This was some time around 1996.


  7. Re: Still can't network Linux and Windows



    I think I finally cracked this nut. The fix was to go into WinXP's
    registry and make a tweak, as follows:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Servic es\Netlogon\Parameters

    Double click on the Requiressignorseal parameter and change dword to
    00000000 from its default of 1.

    Once I did that, I could share files effortlessly back and forth between
    the Windows and Linux boxes.

    On RedHat-type distros (I use both CentOS and FC 5), documentation for
    this can be seen in /usr/share/doc/samba-*/docs/registry and this
    contains registry tweaks for various versions of Windows including XP.

    * is a string corresponding to the version of Samba you have.



  8. Re: Still can't network Linux and Windows


    "Bruce Coryell" wrote in message
    news:44707ddd$0$3681$1e6826b@news.chesco.com...

    > \\Host4 is not accessible. You might not have permission to use this
    > network resource. Contact the administrator of this server to find out if
    > you have access permissions.


    My laptop was working just fine on my home network then all of a sudden I
    started to get the above messages. It seems the problem is all with Windows
    screwing up. I found the following info that may help you. Also don't forget
    that the browse list may take up to 5 to 10 minutes to show up on a newly
    connected/booted Windows computer.

    http://www.tomsnetworking.com/2004/0...fix/index.html

    http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=299357

    --
    Regards,
    Leland C. Scott
    KC8LDO



  9. Re: Still can't network Linux and Windows

    Leland C. Scott wrote:
    > "Bruce Coryell" wrote in message
    > news:44707ddd$0$3681$1e6826b@news.chesco.com...
    >
    >
    >>\\Host4 is not accessible. You might not have permission to use this
    >>network resource. Contact the administrator of this server to find out if
    >>you have access permissions.

    >
    >
    > My laptop was working just fine on my home network then all of a sudden I
    > started to get the above messages. It seems the problem is all with Windows
    > screwing up. I found the following info that may help you. Also don't forget
    > that the browse list may take up to 5 to 10 minutes to show up on a newly
    > connected/booted Windows computer.
    >
    > http://www.tomsnetworking.com/2004/0...fix/index.html
    >
    > http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=299357
    >

    See the post I wrote at 6:58 am, yesterday, below...

    Also had to tweak the firewall settings on the Linux box.

  10. Re: Still can't network Linux and Windows

    That is rather surprising (at least to me) - that setting allows XP
    clients to join a Samba *Domain* server and you do not appear to have
    the settings for a Domain Server. Whatever, apparently a Domain Server
    is the way to go for larger networks.


  11. Re: Still can't network Linux and Windows

    Vlad_Inhaler wrote:
    > That is rather surprising (at least to me) - that setting allows XP
    > clients to join a Samba *Domain* server and you do not appear to have
    > the settings for a Domain Server. Whatever, apparently a Domain Server
    > is the way to go for larger networks.
    >


    No, my intention is to run it as a workgroup, not domain, but this did
    the trick.

    However, now I'm seeing that I can't write to the Linux shares from the
    Windows box, can only read them, and just changing the Linux permissions
    (via chmod) does NOT solve this...the saga is not over yet!

  12. Re: Still can't network Linux and Windows

    Bruce Coryell writes in comp.protocols.smb:

    > I think I finally cracked this nut. The fix was to go into WinXP's
    > registry and make a tweak, as follows:
    >
    > HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Servic es\Netlogon\Parameters
    >
    > Double click on the Requiressignorseal parameter and change dword to
    > 00000000 from its default of 1.
    >
    > Once I did that, I could share files effortlessly back and forth
    > between the Windows and Linux boxes.
    >
    > On RedHat-type distros (I use both CentOS and FC 5), documentation for
    > this can be seen in /usr/share/doc/samba-*/docs/registry and this
    > contains registry tweaks for various versions of Windows including XP.
    >
    > * is a string corresponding to the version of Samba you have.


    What samba version is used?

    My understanding (from various mailing list archives) is that on samba 3 that
    Requiressignorseal is not needed.



  13. Re: Still can't network Linux and Windows

    Bruce,

    The real problem for me was the NetBIOS name resolution was not occurring.
    My laptop got mucked up after connecting it to a network at a university I
    was at. This apparently has happened to other people connecting their
    computers up to 'foreign networks'. Seems their DHCP server caused some
    changes to be made in the way NetBIOS names get resolved to IP addresses.
    This was due to a few registry keys that got changed.

    Normally on a small home network a network broadcast is made on the local
    subnet requesting the IP address of the machine with a given name. All
    machines get the message and only the one matching the machine name returns
    it's IP address. This is like the classic ARP protocol.

    In my case the protocol was changed to a point-to-point method. In other
    words the inquiring machines send their request to the network WINS server,
    sort of like a DNS lookup. However if there isn't one, the usual case on
    home networks, there isn't one to send a reply so the name look up fails.
    Thus you can't browse the local network and the machines don't show up in
    network neighborhood. You should still be able to connect by doing a
    computer look up using the dotted IP address.

    Which method to use is specified by a 'node type'. Apparently you can
    change the node type that Windows uses to do both. Depending on what value
    you use either the broadcast is done first or the WINS server request is
    done first. If no response is received then the second method is used.

    I had to modify a few registry key settings, specifically 'dhcpnodetype'.
    This will override the value used for 'nodetype' if it is in the registry.
    If neither one is there then Windows uses the broadcast method as a default.
    Make sure you find ALL of the keys and change them! See the URL's below.

    http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=903267 (Problem description and fix)

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/160177/ (Node types)

    Hope this helps and explains why the key setting has to be changed. If you
    use a laptop at home and on the road you're likely to run in to this problem
    again. I spent the better part of 3 days trying to find out what happened
    and how to fix it. I'm really surprised that Micro$oft doesn't configure the
    system to do both by default when you install the OS. That would really save
    a lot of needless trouble fixing stupid problems like this, I got better
    things to do.

    --
    Regards,
    Leland C. Scott
    KC8LDO

    "Bruce Coryell" wrote in message
    news:447585f3$0$3688$1e6826b@news.chesco.com...
    > Leland C. Scott wrote:
    >> "Bruce Coryell" wrote in message
    >> news:44707ddd$0$3681$1e6826b@news.chesco.com...
    >>
    >>
    >>>\\Host4 is not accessible. You might not have permission to use this
    >>>network resource. Contact the administrator of this server to find out
    >>>if you have access permissions.

    >>
    >>
    >> My laptop was working just fine on my home network then all of a sudden I
    >> started to get the above messages. It seems the problem is all with
    >> Windows
    >> screwing up. I found the following info that may help you. Also don't
    >> forget
    >> that the browse list may take up to 5 to 10 minutes to show up on a newly
    >> connected/booted Windows computer.
    >>
    >> http://www.tomsnetworking.com/2004/0...fix/index.html
    >>
    >> http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=299357
    >>

    > See the post I wrote at 6:58 am, yesterday, below...
    >
    > Also had to tweak the firewall settings on the Linux box.




  14. Re: Still can't network Linux and Windows


    "Bruce Coryell" wrote in message
    news:44758e70$0$3695$1e6826b@news.chesco.com...
    > Vlad_Inhaler wrote:
    >> That is rather surprising (at least to me) - that setting allows XP
    >> clients to join a Samba *Domain* server and you do not appear to have
    >> the settings for a Domain Server. Whatever, apparently a Domain Server
    >> is the way to go for larger networks.
    >>

    >
    > No, my intention is to run it as a workgroup, not domain, but this did the
    > trick.
    >
    > However, now I'm seeing that I can't write to the Linux shares from the
    > Windows box, can only read them, and just changing the Linux permissions
    > (via chmod) does NOT solve this...the saga is not over yet!


    I thought that chmod only changes the file permissions for users logged
    directly in to the machine. File and printer sharing has to be setup using
    Samba if you want access using that method. Samba has it's own permissions
    you have to setup independent of the OS. On my system, FC3, I had to set the
    share to 'writable' and made it 'visible. I used the Samba GUI widget in
    Gnome to set things up. If you need to setup quotas you have to either use
    Swat and or the command line to configure it if I remember reading that
    right.


    --
    Regards,
    Leland C. Scott
    KC8LDO



  15. Re: Still can't network Linux and Windows

    ok, two points here.

    1 - If you are coming in as user xyz them user xyz needs update
    permissions to be able to write. This applies at the file level and at
    the directory level.
    2 - Bruce - you need to find out what is wrong rather than poking
    things at random.
    Set 'debug level = 2' and start looking at the appropriate logs.
    It is possible that you have told Samba not to allow updates here, it
    is also possible that this is a problem with Unix permissions.

    btw, I seem to remember that config changes take effect a few seconds
    later so you do not need to always stop and restart Samba.


  16. Re: Still can't network Linux and Windows

    "LeIand C. Scott" writes in comp.protocols.smb:

    > "Bruce Coryell" wrote in message
    > news:44758e70$0$3695$1e6826b@news.chesco.com...
    > > Vlad_Inhaler wrote:
    > >> That is rather surprising (at least to me) - that setting allows XP
    > >> clients to join a Samba *Domain* server and you do not appear to have
    > >> the settings for a Domain Server. Whatever, apparently a Domain Server
    > >> is the way to go for larger networks.
    > >>

    > >
    > > No, my intention is to run it as a workgroup, not domain, but this did the
    > > trick.
    > >
    > > However, now I'm seeing that I can't write to the Linux shares from the
    > > Windows box, can only read them, and just changing the Linux permissions
    > > (via chmod) does NOT solve this...the saga is not over yet!

    >
    > I thought that chmod only changes the file permissions for users logged
    > directly in to the machine. File and printer sharing has to be setup using
    > Samba if you want access using that method. Samba has it's own permissions
    > you have to setup independent of the OS. On my system, FC3, I had to set the

    =======================================

    No.
    http://us4.samba.org/samba/docs/man/...html#id2579902
    quote:

    | All access to UNIX/Linux system files via Samba is controlled by the
    | operating system file access controls. When trying to figure out file
    | access problems, it is vitally important to find the identity of the Windows
    | user as it is presented by Samba at the point of file access. This can best
    | be determined from the Samba log files.


  17. Re: Still can't network Linux and Windows - additional info

    LeIand C. Scott wrote:
    > "Bruce Coryell" wrote in message
    > news:44758e70$0$3695$1e6826b@news.chesco.com...
    >
    >>Vlad_Inhaler wrote:
    >>
    >>>That is rather surprising (at least to me) - that setting allows XP
    >>>clients to join a Samba *Domain* server and you do not appear to have
    >>>the settings for a Domain Server. Whatever, apparently a Domain Server
    >>>is the way to go for larger networks.
    >>>

    >>
    >>No, my intention is to run it as a workgroup, not domain, but this did the
    >>trick.
    >>
    >>However, now I'm seeing that I can't write to the Linux shares from the
    >>Windows box, can only read them, and just changing the Linux permissions
    >>(via chmod) does NOT solve this...the saga is not over yet!

    >
    >
    > I thought that chmod only changes the file permissions for users logged
    > directly in to the machine. File and printer sharing has to be setup using
    > Samba if you want access using that method. Samba has it's own permissions
    > you have to setup independent of the OS. On my system, FC3, I had to set the
    > share to 'writable' and made it 'visible. I used the Samba GUI widget in
    > Gnome to set things up. If you need to setup quotas you have to either use
    > Swat and or the command line to configure it if I remember reading that
    > right.
    >
    >


    I have the shares as 'writeable' and 'browseable'. My Windows box can
    see the shares and read them, so the 'browseable' part is working, but I
    have a problem with the 'writeable' part. I think this is a deep issue
    with file ownerships and permissions in Linux that is causing this.

    Another thing to throw out: One of the Linux shares is a FAT32 (vfat)
    partition, and Windows CAN write to that over the network connection.
    It's just the Linux partitions (ext3) that it can't write to.

    I have all shares set to 777 (rwxrwxrwx) so that should take care of the
    permissions issue. In /etc/fstab the drive partitions are set to
    'defaults' do changes need to be made here? (The vfat partition is set
    to 'user,rw, umask=0' but Windows-type partitions don't have
    permissions, the umask settimg is a hack to make them work in Linux)

  18. Re: Still can't network Linux and Windows


    "Kari Hurtta" wrote in message
    news:5dk689ccnj.fsf@attruh.keh.iki.fi...
    > "LeIand C. Scott" writes in comp.protocols.smb:
    >
    >> "Bruce Coryell" wrote in message
    >> news:44758e70$0$3695$1e6826b@news.chesco.com...
    >> > Vlad_Inhaler wrote:
    >> >> That is rather surprising (at least to me) - that setting allows XP
    >> >> clients to join a Samba *Domain* server and you do not appear to have
    >> >> the settings for a Domain Server. Whatever, apparently a Domain
    >> >> Server
    >> >> is the way to go for larger networks.
    >> >>
    >> >
    >> > No, my intention is to run it as a workgroup, not domain, but this did
    >> > the
    >> > trick.
    >> >
    >> > However, now I'm seeing that I can't write to the Linux shares from the
    >> > Windows box, can only read them, and just changing the Linux
    >> > permissions
    >> > (via chmod) does NOT solve this...the saga is not over yet!

    >>
    >> I thought that chmod only changes the file permissions for users logged
    >> directly in to the machine. File and printer sharing has to be setup
    >> using
    >> Samba if you want access using that method. Samba has it's own
    >> permissions
    >> you have to setup independent of the OS. On my system, FC3, I had to set
    >> the

    > =======================================
    >
    > No.
    >
    > http://us4.samba.org/samba/docs/man/...html#id2579902
    > quote:
    >
    > | All access to UNIX/Linux system files via Samba is controlled by the
    > | operating system file access controls. When trying to figure out file
    > | access problems, it is vitally important to find the identity of the
    > Windows
    > | user as it is presented by Samba at the point of file access. This can
    > best
    > | be determined from the Samba log files.


    So it is possible to have r-w-e permissions for local users on the machine
    but when using Samba those same files can be read-only even if it's the same
    user. That seems to be what I found when I set up my system. I do understand
    the OS permissions always take precedence over anything that is setup by
    Samba. So if the Samba user needs to have write permission then at least the
    user account on the system has to let the user have the same rights for
    those files. I found that out by copying some files, with root ownership
    only, over to a regular user account to look at one point. I found that I
    couldn't erase the files later using file sharing under Samba. I am still
    new to the Linux system, I'm learning things everyday, so if I got something
    wrong here I would like to know since it could be useful later. Constructive
    comments are always welcomed.

    --
    Regards,
    Leland C. Scott
    KC8LDO



  19. Re: Still can't network Linux and Windows


    "Kari Hurtta" wrote in message
    news:5dk689ccnj.fsf@attruh.keh.iki.fi...
    > "LeIand C. Scott" writes in comp.protocols.smb:
    >
    >> "Bruce Coryell" wrote in message
    >> news:44758e70$0$3695$1e6826b@news.chesco.com...
    >> > Vlad_Inhaler wrote:
    >> >> That is rather surprising (at least to me) - that setting allows XP
    >> >> clients to join a Samba *Domain* server and you do not appear to have
    >> >> the settings for a Domain Server. Whatever, apparently a Domain
    >> >> Server
    >> >> is the way to go for larger networks.
    >> >>
    >> >
    >> > No, my intention is to run it as a workgroup, not domain, but this did
    >> > the
    >> > trick.
    >> >
    >> > However, now I'm seeing that I can't write to the Linux shares from the
    >> > Windows box, can only read them, and just changing the Linux
    >> > permissions
    >> > (via chmod) does NOT solve this...the saga is not over yet!

    >>
    >> I thought that chmod only changes the file permissions for users logged
    >> directly in to the machine. File and printer sharing has to be setup
    >> using
    >> Samba if you want access using that method. Samba has it's own
    >> permissions
    >> you have to setup independent of the OS. On my system, FC3, I had to set
    >> the

    > =======================================
    >
    > No.
    >
    > http://us4.samba.org/samba/docs/man/...html#id2579902
    > quote:
    >
    > | All access to UNIX/Linux system files via Samba is controlled by the
    > | operating system file access controls. When trying to figure out file
    > | access problems, it is vitally important to find the identity of the
    > Windows
    > | user as it is presented by Samba at the point of file access. This can
    > best
    > | be determined from the Samba log files.
    >


    So it is possible to have r-w-e permissions for local users on the machine
    but when using Samba those same files can be read-only even if it's the same
    user. That seems to be what I found when I set up my system. I do understand
    the OS permissions always take precedence over anything that is setup by
    Samba. So if the Samba user needs to have write permission then at least the
    user account on the system has to let the user have the same rights for
    those files. I found that out by copying some files, with root ownership
    only, over to a regular user account to look at one point. I found that I
    couldn't erase the files later using file sharing under Samba. I am still
    new to the Linux system, I'm learning things everyday, so if I got something
    wrong here I would like to know since it could be useful later. Constructive
    comments are always welcomed.

    --
    Regards,
    Leland C. Scott
    KC8LDO




  20. Re: Still can't network Linux and Windows

    "LeIand C. Scott" writes:

    > "Kari Hurtta" wrote in message
    > news:5dk689ccnj.fsf@attruh.keh.iki.fi...
    > > "LeIand C. Scott" writes in comp.protocols.smb:
    > >


    > >> > However, now I'm seeing that I can't write to the Linux shares from the
    > >> > Windows box, can only read them, and just changing the Linux
    > >> > permissions
    > >> > (via chmod) does NOT solve this...the saga is not over yet!


    Default for share (on smb.conf) is probably
    writable = no

    ( 'writable' 'writeable' 'read only' are if I remeber correctly
    esentially same option ('read only' is just negated.) )


    > >> I thought that chmod only changes the file permissions for users logged
    > >> directly in to the machine. File and printer sharing has to be setup
    > >> using
    > >> Samba if you want access using that method. Samba has it's own
    > >> permissions
    > >> you have to setup independent of the OS. On my system, FC3, I had to set
    > >> the

    > > =======================================
    > >
    > > No.
    > >
    > > http://us4.samba.org/samba/docs/man/...html#id2579902
    > > quote:
    > >
    > > | All access to UNIX/Linux system files via Samba is controlled by the
    > > | operating system file access controls. When trying to figure out file
    > > | access problems, it is vitally important to find the identity of the
    > > Windows
    > > | user as it is presented by Samba at the point of file access. This can
    > > best
    > > | be determined from the Samba log files.

    >
    > So it is possible to have r-w-e permissions for local users on the machine
    > but when using Samba those same files can be read-only even if it's the same
    > user. That seems to be what I found when I set up my system. I do understand
    > the OS permissions always take precedence over anything that is setup by
    > Samba. So if the Samba user needs to have write permission then at least the
    > user account on the system has to let the user have the same rights for
    > those files. I found that out by copying some files, with root ownership
    > only, over to a regular user account to look at one point. I found that I
    > couldn't erase the files later using file sharing under Samba. I am still
    > new to the Linux system, I'm learning things everyday, so if I got something
    > wrong here I would like to know since it could be useful later. Constructive
    > comments are always welcomed.


    Discussed on

    http://us4.samba.org/samba/docs/man/...sControls.html


    There seems to be quite lot of strange things what samba does (and not
    just doing it and let OS do permission checks.)


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