stupid Q on networking - Slackware

This is a discussion on stupid Q on networking - Slackware ; hello How to make computers on different networks see eachother? I have an adsl router which created a 192.168.0.1 / 255 subnetwork. And there is a computer 192.168.0.11. To this router another wireless router is connected and it created a ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: stupid Q on networking

  1. stupid Q on networking

    hello

    How to make computers on different networks see eachother?

    I have an adsl router which created a 192.168.0.1 / 255 subnetwork. And
    there is a computer 192.168.0.11. To this router another wireless router is
    connected and it created a subnetwork 192.168.1.1 / 255. And there is a
    computer 192.168.1.5.

    So, how to make them see eachother? How to configure the 2 ?

    Thank you



  2. Re: stupid Q on networking

    =SERGE= wrote:

    > hello
    >
    > How to make computers on different networks see eachother?
    >
    > I have an adsl router which created a 192.168.0.1 / 255 subnetwork. And
    > there is a computer 192.168.0.11. To this router another wireless router
    > is connected and it created a subnetwork 192.168.1.1 / 255. And there is a
    > computer 192.168.1.5.
    >
    > So, how to make them see eachother? How to configure the 2 ?


    There are far more knowledgable people here than me. One likely stumbling
    block is the wireless router. If you have the upstream (WAN) side of the
    wireless router connected to the asdl router then the wireless router will
    likely be doing NAT (Network Address Translation). That means that the
    computer at 192.168.0.11 will not be able to connect to computers on
    192.168.1.1/255.255.255.0.

    I've not tried this but try connecting the lan side (ie the one of the four
    ports) of the asdl router and the wireless routers lan side (one of its
    four ports) together. You may need a cross over cable or it may just sort
    itself out. If you are lucky the wireless router may just bridge together
    the wireless and wired networks into one happy network.

    Mind you - with two PC's, a slug and an eee I seem to have generated three
    subnets so far...

    Pete



    --
    http://www.petezilla.co.uk

  3. Re: stupid Q on networking

    On 2008-10-17, Peter Chant wrote:
    >=SERGE= wrote:
    >
    >> I have an adsl router which created a 192.168.0.1 / 255 subnetwork. And
    >> there is a computer 192.168.0.11. To this router another wireless router
    >> is connected and it created a subnetwork 192.168.1.1 / 255. And there is a
    >> computer 192.168.1.5.

    >
    > There are far more knowledgable people here than me. One likely stumbling
    > block is the wireless router. If you have the upstream (WAN) side of the
    > wireless router connected to the asdl router then the wireless router will
    > likely be doing NAT (Network Address Translation). That means that the
    > computer at 192.168.0.11 will not be able to connect to computers on
    > 192.168.1.1/255.255.255.0.
    >
    > I've not tried this but try connecting the lan side (ie the one of the four
    > ports) of the asdl router and the wireless routers lan side (one of its
    > four ports) together. You may need a cross over cable or it may just sort
    > itself out. If you are lucky the wireless router may just bridge together
    > the wireless and wired networks into one happy network.


    This is certainly the laziest way to go, but the OP will need to
    reconfigure the wireless device's network to 192.168.0.x. What you're
    describing is basically using the wireless device as a switch instead of
    a router. There are potential security implications, in that you bring
    your wifi traffic onto your wired network; this may or may not be a
    problem, depending on what services you already provide on the wired
    network.

    --keith

    --
    kkeller-usenet@wombat.san-francisco.ca.us
    (try just my userid to email me)
    AOLSFAQ=http://www.therockgarden.ca/aolsfaq.txt
    see X- headers for PGP signature information


  4. Re: stupid Q on networking

    Keith Keller wrote:

    > ... There are potential security implications, in that you bring your
    > wifi traffic onto your wired network; this may or may not be a
    > problem, depending on what services you already provide on the wired
    > network.


    Or how carefully you control access to your wireless network. One of
    the points that I find missing in the original message is whether (or
    how) the wireless access-point/router and its network are connected to
    the DSL modem/router and its network. In order for the two computers on
    the different networks to be able to see each other, such a link needs
    to exist, and we currently don't have any information suggesting that
    one does.

    --
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Sylvain Robitaille syl@alcor.concordia.ca

    Network and Systems analyst Concordia University
    Instructional & Information Technology Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

  5. Re: stupid Q on networking

    Sylvain Robitaille wrote:

    > Keith Keller wrote:
    >
    >> ... There are potential security implications, in that you bring your
    >> wifi traffic onto your wired network; this may or may not be a
    >> problem, depending on what services you already provide on the wired
    >> network.

    >
    > Or how carefully you control access to your wireless network. One of
    > the points that I find missing in the original message is whether (or
    > how) the wireless access-point/router and its network are connected to
    > the DSL modem/router and its network. In order for the two computers on
    > the different networks to be able to see each other, such a link needs
    > to exist, and we currently don't have any information suggesting that
    > one does.
    >


    Indeed, or whether any ip's are assigned via dhcp or static, and if dhcp
    have any steps been taken to ensure that the same addresses are assigned on
    lease renew (or reboot).
    --
    http://www.petezilla.co.uk

  6. Re: stupid Q on networking

    Well the wireless router is connected to the dsl router by cable.
    The dsl router creates a 192.168.0.1 network and the wireless creates a
    192.168.1.1 net.
    So the Q is how 2 computers on diffrent networks should be configured for
    them to be able to see each other?

    Thank you
    "Sylvain Robitaille" сообщил/сообщила в новостях
    следующее: news:slrngfi66f.l0g.syl@charlotte.concordia.ca...
    > Keith Keller wrote:
    >
    >> ... There are potential security implications, in that you bring your
    >> wifi traffic onto your wired network; this may or may not be a
    >> problem, depending on what services you already provide on the wired
    >> network.

    >
    > Or how carefully you control access to your wireless network. One of
    > the points that I find missing in the original message is whether (or
    > how) the wireless access-point/router and its network are connected to
    > the DSL modem/router and its network. In order for the two computers on
    > the different networks to be able to see each other, such a link needs
    > to exist, and we currently don't have any information suggesting that
    > one does.
    >
    > --
    > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    > Sylvain Robitaille syl@alcor.concordia.ca
    >
    > Network and Systems analyst Concordia University
    > Instructional & Information Technology Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    > ----------------------------------------------------------------------




  7. Re: stupid Q on networking

    =SERGE= wrote:

    > Well the wireless router is connected to the dsl router by cable.


    Is a computer on the wireless side able to access the DSL service? Are
    you able to access the configuration of the wireless access point from a
    computer on the wired network? What is the configuration of the network
    interfaces connecting the two devices?

    > The dsl router creates a 192.168.0.1 network and the wireless creates
    > a 192.168.1.1 net.


    You do realize that this is normally configurable, right? What network
    is the wireless access point's wired interface on? 192.168.0.0/24?

    > So the Q is how 2 computers on diffrent networks should be configured
    > for them to be able to see each other?


    If both the DSL modem and wireless access point are indeed also routers,
    you should need only to configure one to route traffic between the two
    networks, but that means that it should have an interface on each
    network.

    You might want to simplify this and merge the two networks into one.
    Get only one of the network devices to act as a router and DHCP server,
    and the other as only a switch (or wireless access point).

    --
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Sylvain Robitaille syl@alcor.concordia.ca

    Network and Systems analyst Concordia University
    Instructional & Information Technology Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

+ Reply to Thread