Re: Can anyone recommend a good bandwidth meter for slack? - Slackware

This is a discussion on Re: Can anyone recommend a good bandwidth meter for slack? - Slackware ; On 2008-09-22, Frank Bell wrote: > Unfortunately, I'm a Comcast customer. > > http://www.comcast.net/terms/network/amendment/ A bandwidth allowance of 250 gig per month seems fairly generous. My own data allowance for example is 12 gig per month. You do a lot ...

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Thread: Re: Can anyone recommend a good bandwidth meter for slack?

  1. Re: Can anyone recommend a good bandwidth meter for slack?

    On 2008-09-22, Frank Bell wrote:

    > Unfortunately, I'm a Comcast customer.
    >
    > http://www.comcast.net/terms/network/amendment/


    A bandwidth allowance of 250 gig per month seems fairly generous. My own
    data allowance for example is 12 gig per month. You do a lot of
    downloading?

    Andrew

    --
    Do you think that's air you're breathing now?

  2. Re: Can anyone recommend a good bandwidth meter for slack?

    andrew wrote:
    > On 2008-09-22, Frank Bell wrote:
    >
    >> Unfortunately, I'm a Comcast customer.
    >>
    >> http://www.comcast.net/terms/network/amendment/

    >
    > A bandwidth allowance of 250 gig per month seems fairly generous. My own
    > data allowance for example is 12 gig per month. You do a lot of
    > downloading?


    At least they're *finally* advertising what "unlimited" really means.

    But 250GB/month = 800kbps; that's 14x the old 56k modem, but its not
    exactly stellar.

    As to the original question, the kernel's iptables should provide
    sufficient data. Its cross-platform, so any tutorial should do.
    Here's the top hit for "iptables bandwidth monitoring".
    http://www.linux.com/articles/50649

    For instantaneous bandwidth, try ksysguard or one of the many packages
    which wraps iptables.

    - Daniel

  3. Re: Can anyone recommend a good bandwidth meter for slack?

    On Sun, 21 Sep 2008 23:19:13 -0400, D Herring wrote:

    >andrew wrote:
    >> On 2008-09-22, Frank Bell wrote:
    >>
    >>> Unfortunately, I'm a Comcast customer.
    >>>
    >>> http://www.comcast.net/terms/network/amendment/

    >>
    >> A bandwidth allowance of 250 gig per month seems fairly generous. My own
    >> data allowance for example is 12 gig per month. You do a lot of
    >> downloading?

    >
    >At least they're *finally* advertising what "unlimited" really means.
    >
    >But 250GB/month = 800kbps; that's 14x the old 56k modem, but its not
    >exactly stellar.
    >
    >As to the original question, the kernel's iptables should provide
    >sufficient data. Its cross-platform, so any tutorial should do.
    >Here's the top hit for "iptables bandwidth monitoring".
    >http://www.linux.com/articles/50649
    >
    >For instantaneous bandwidth, try ksysguard or one of the many packages
    >which wraps iptables.


    Or build your own, I did here: http://bugsplatter.id.au/netdraw/

    Source is there too, looks at the network interface rather than
    iptables.

    Grant.
    --
    http://bugsplatter.id.au/

  4. Re: Can anyone recommend a good bandwidth meter for slack?

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    D Herring wrote:

    > But 250GB/month = 800kbps; that's 14x the old 56k modem, but its not
    > exactly stellar.


    Yeah that's if you take the max bandwidth and divide by 24/7 online. That's
    not logical. People don't use their bandwidth at a constant rate all day.
    Cable modems go faster than 800kbps typically, and indeed people often buy
    a line faster than this. It's not the speed they're capping: it's total
    bandwidth used. You're free to download stuff faster than that, and indeed
    you can, just the total amount can't go above 250GB without some fine or
    penalty.

    As for most residental users, with their use for the internet, I don't think
    the best fix (especially in terms of setting it up, etc) is putting a
    restriction on their machines. I think it's using common sense and making
    slight changes to their internet use practices.

    The typical person I talk to about this decision who thinks it's bad, when
    you get into how they use it, they're also downloading lots of stuff
    illegally on P2P. I don't blame ComCast at all. 250GB is very generous,
    especially if you read the link: the average user is only using 2-3 GB /
    month.


    >
    > As to the original question, the kernel's iptables should provide
    > sufficient data. Its cross-platform, so any tutorial should do.
    > Here's the top hit for "iptables bandwidth monitoring".
    > http://www.linux.com/articles/50649
    >
    > For instantaneous bandwidth, try ksysguard or one of the many packages
    > which wraps iptables.
    >
    > - Daniel


    - --
    Robert Delahunt

    Ezekiel 11:19 New King James Version
    Then I will give them one heart, and I will put a new spirit within them,
    and take the stony heart out of their flesh, and give them a heart of
    flesh....
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    47AAmOcZhUXAWYAO34kpA29ocGnxaDQ=
    =c+YH
    -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----

  5. Re: Can anyone recommend a good bandwidth meter for slack?

    On Sun, 21 Sep 2008 21:15:19 -0400, andrew
    wrote:

    > A bandwidth allowance of 250 gig per month seems fairly generous. My own
    > data allowance for example is 12 gig per month. You do a lot of
    > downloading?


    I have a 20-year old and a webserver, a giganews account, and seven
    computers on my network--no peer-to-peer or netflix or anything like that.

    I just want to get a feel for usage.


  6. Re: Can anyone recommend a good bandwidth meter for slack?

    Robert Delahunt wrote:
    > D Herring wrote:
    >
    >> But 250GB/month = 800kbps; that's 14x the old 56k modem, but its not
    >> exactly stellar.

    >
    > Yeah that's if you take the max bandwidth and divide by 24/7 online. That's
    > not logical. People don't use their bandwidth at a constant rate all day.
    > Cable modems go faster than 800kbps typically, and indeed people often buy
    > a line faster than this. It's not the speed they're capping: it's total
    > bandwidth used. You're free to download stuff faster than that, and indeed
    > you can, just the total amount can't go above 250GB without some fine or
    > penalty.


    Absolutely true. But AOL was selling 24/7 dialup 15 years ago.
    "Moore's law" is what, 2x in 2 years? So we should see a 128x gain.

    The other point is this: "most users" sip their 2-3GB during peak
    hours; these bandwidth hogs don't. Networks are stressed during the
    peak hours; off-peak traffic doesn't really affect the average user,
    but Comcast doesn't care.

    Ah well... I think I've broke 50GB/month a couple times so this is a
    mostly academic issue for me.


    > The typical person I talk to about this decision who thinks it's bad, when
    > you get into how they use it, they're also downloading lots of stuff
    > illegally on P2P. I don't blame ComCast at all. 250GB is very generous,
    > especially if you read the link: the average user is only using 2-3 GB /
    > month.


    $30+/month for 3GB is a ripoff. Poor fools.

    Does nobody remember the "dark fiber" stories from years ago? I'm not
    convinced the major ISPs are trying very hard to help their customers.

    - Daniel

  7. Re: Can anyone recommend a good bandwidth meter for slack?

    Frank Bell wrote:
    > On Sun, 21 Sep 2008 21:15:19 -0400, andrew
    > wrote:
    >
    > > A bandwidth allowance of 250 gig per month seems fairly generous. My own
    > > data allowance for example is 12 gig per month. You do a lot of
    > > downloading?

    >
    > I have a 20-year old and a webserver, a giganews account, and seven
    > computers on my network--no peer-to-peer or netflix or anything like that.
    >
    > I just want to get a feel for usage.


    ntop is a perfect solution for these small networks

    http://www.ntop.org/
    http://www.ntop.org/overview.html

    depends on rrdtools and mrtg, ntop can provide detailed statistics of your
    usage for hosts and service bandwith

    http://oss.oetiker.ch/rrdtool/
    http://oss.oetiker.ch/mrtg/


    cu Frank

    --
    "By then he'd already learned some social skills and knew that one just
    doesn't admit to liking computer games after the age of 12. So when he was
    playin Doom, he used to explain that he was debugging and stress testing
    memory management and the X server." (Lars Wirzenius über Linus Torvalds)

  8. Re: Can anyone recommend a good bandwidth meter for slack?

    On 2008-09-25, Robert Delahunt wrote:

    > I may be lucky in South Korea to get 2GB for $30, so you should be
    > thankful.


    Exactly! My scheme in Australia 12 gig for $39 per month and a 512 / 128
    adsl scheme. But Australia has always had ripoff pricing.

    Andrew

    --
    Do you think that's air you're breathing now?

  9. Re: Can anyone recommend a good bandwidth meter for slack?

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    Hash: SHA1

    Doesn't matter what Moore's law is. Moore could not predict the future.

    I may be lucky in South Korea to get 2GB for $30, so you should be thankful.

    D Herring wrote:

    > Absolutely true. But AOL was selling 24/7 dialup 15 years ago.
    > "Moore's law" is what, 2x in 2 years? So we should see a 128x gain.
    >
    > The other point is this: "most users" sip their 2-3GB during peak
    > hours; these bandwidth hogs don't. Networks are stressed during the
    > peak hours; off-peak traffic doesn't really affect the average user,
    > but Comcast doesn't care.
    >
    > Ah well... I think I've broke 50GB/month a couple times so this is a
    > mostly academic issue for me.
    >
    > $30+/month for 3GB is a ripoff. Poor fools.
    >
    > Does nobody remember the "dark fiber" stories from years ago? I'm not
    > convinced the major ISPs are trying very hard to help their customers.
    >
    > - Daniel


    - --
    Robert Delahunt

    Ezekiel 11:19 New King James Version
    Then I will give them one heart, and I will put a new spirit within them,
    and take the stony heart out of their flesh, and give them a heart of
    flesh....
    -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
    Version: GnuPG v1.4.9 (GNU/Linux)

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    =+TKm
    -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----

  10. Re: Can anyone recommend a good bandwidth meter for slack?

    On Thu, 25 Sep 2008 10:52:11 +1000, andrew wrote:

    >On 2008-09-25, Robert Delahunt wrote:
    >
    >> I may be lucky in South Korea to get 2GB for $30, so you should be
    >> thankful.

    >
    >Exactly! My scheme in Australia 12 gig for $39 per month and a 512 / 128
    >adsl scheme. But Australia has always had ripoff pricing.


    Got dodo 512/128 'unlimited' --> au$50/month, limit is now documented as
    60GB/month and they kick over-users out, according to whirlpool forum
    comments.

    I wrote my own bandwidth monitor to a) follow dodo counting rule (1k =
    1000) and to see by how much dodo inflate their user data rates (only a
    few percent, probably encapsulation).

    One possibility I've not yet tried is monitoring iptables numbers, I
    think they're 64-bit -- the ifconfig (/proc/net/dev) numbers are 32-bit.

    Grant.
    --
    http://bugsplatter.id.au/

  11. Re: Can anyone recommend a good bandwidth meter for slack?

    On Wed, 24 Sep 2008 20:22:48 -0500, Robert Delahunt wrote:



    Ahhh, the extremely rare quad-luser post. Not often seen, especially here
    in AOLS. This kind of exhibit is usually only seen in a.o.l.ubuntu or
    something like 24hoursupport.helpdesk...

    1. Top posting
    2. PGP sig on Usenet
    3. Bible-thumper quotation in sig
    4. Borked sig delimiter

    Only things which could be added would be to have posted it in HTML, from
    Windoze!

    Pathetic.


    --
    "Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".
    The Usenet Improvement Project: http://improve-usenet.org


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