login new user ? - Slackware

This is a discussion on login new user ? - Slackware ; I always run as root, because the continual set-up changes need the facilities of root. Now I want to setup some other 'users', mainly to get the default file locations spread around different/better 'roots'. So eg. If I login as ...

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  1. login new user ?

    I always run as root, because the continual set-up changes
    need the facilities of root.

    Now I want to setup some other 'users', mainly to get the
    default file locations spread around different/better
    'roots'. So eg. If I login as emacs, then I'll get emacs'
    files defaulting to /home/emacs.

    Previously when I experimented how to login as non-root,
    it was done at a VT. Now that I'm using an installation
    that boots into X, I found the app. that setsup a new user;
    but how do I login [swap-from-root] to user: emacs ?

    I don't want to have to go-back to VT.
    And I don't want an extra X to load.
    I just want to quickly toggle between 'root' & 'emacs' users.

    What should I do ?

    == Chris Glur.


  2. Re: login new user ?

    On Wed, 03 Sep 2008 09:24:35 -0500, problems wrote:

    > I always run as root, because the continual set-up changes
    > need the facilities of root.


    You're an ignorant n00b.

    > Now I want to setup some other 'users', mainly to get the
    > default file locations spread around different/better
    > 'roots'. So eg. If I login as emacs, then I'll get emacs'
    > files defaulting to /home/emacs.
    >
    > Previously when I experimented how to login as non-root,
    > it was done at a VT. Now that I'm using an installation
    > that boots into X, I found the app. that setsup a new user;
    > but how do I login [swap-from-root] to user: emacs ?
    >
    > I don't want to have to go-back to VT.
    > And I don't want an extra X to load.
    > I just want to quickly toggle between 'root' & 'emacs' users.
    >
    > What should I do ?


    man su
    man useradd


    --
    "Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".
    The Usenet Improvement Project: http://improve-usenet.org


  3. Re: login new user ?

    problems@gmail wrote:
    > What should I do ?


    read the slackbook, for crying out loud: .


    --
    Joost Kremers joostkremers@yahoo.com
    Selbst in die Unterwelt dringt durch Spalten Licht
    EN:SiS(9)

  4. Re: login new user ?

    On Wed, 03 Sep 2008 09:24:35 -0500, problems wrote:

    > I always run as root, because the continual set-up changes need the
    > facilities of root.
    > [Omitted.]
    > What should I do ?


    For starters, you should learn why running always as root is a
    VERY bad idea.



  5. Re: login new user ?

    Jens Stueckelberger wrote:
    > On Wed, 03 Sep 2008 09:24:35 -0500, problems wrote:
    >
    >> I always run as root, because the continual set-up changes need the
    >> facilities of root.
    >> [Omitted.]
    >> What should I do ?

    >
    > For starters, you should learn why running always as root is a
    > VERY bad idea.
    >
    >

    Try telling that to initd...


  6. Re: login new user ?

    On Wed, 3 Sep 2008, problems@gmail wrote:

    > I always run as root, because the continual set-up changes
    > need the facilities of root.
    >

    YOu aren't even clear there. Are you saying "since I have to
    constantly get root privilege to change things, I might
    as well be root all the time" or "waa, waa, waa, it's too much
    trouble to configure things so I don't have to be root to run
    things so I'll run as root"?

    If it's the former, nobody has to be continuously changing things.
    You only have to do it occasionally, likely the frequency dependent
    on how frequently you add software or even hardware. Yes, when
    starting out with Linux, there is a period when you may be doing
    a lot of configuring, since you are starting out and want things
    your way. But after that period, you may find you can run a program
    for years or decades and not do any configuring.

    Note also that a lot of programs either have local configuration
    files or allow for them. So except for global configuration, you
    can set that application you like just the way you want it from
    your user account.

    If it's the latter, well then maybe you shouldn't be using
    Linux. It's arranged so damage cannot be done, so some things
    can't be done unless you specifically allow it. It's just another
    bit of congifuration, not unlike setting seamonkey so it displays
    the way you like it. Instead of trying to circumvent the security
    of the operating system, you should learn about it and learn what
    needs to be done. Again, it will take some work to begin with,
    but it won't be a regular thing; since you ought to be keeping
    notes, any work done now will be easy to replicate later if you
    change distributions or when it's time to upgrade the current
    distribution.

    Can't use your cdrom drive as a user? Then instead of running
    as root because you misbelieve that that's the only way to
    do it, you look into permission and such, and add yourself to
    the group that can use the cdrom. Or maybe you have to made
    the cdrom part of a new group that you are in, it depends
    on how the distribution comes from the factory.

    It's really quite simple. And the thing is, it is safe. If you've
    got a Big Mult-user System, you want that ability to control who
    has access. You don't want a random person sliding a CDROM into
    the machine. But as a desktop user, you can give yourself access
    to all the things, yet still keep the security.

    > Now I want to setup some other 'users', mainly to get the
    > default file locations spread around different/better
    > 'roots'. So eg. If I login as emacs, then I'll get emacs'
    > files defaulting to /home/emacs.
    >

    What's the point of this? I think this is a reflection of
    the cluelessness of your first point, but I'm not sure. If
    you have emacs running as one user, and your browser in another,
    then you can edit all you like, but you won't have anything
    valuable to edit, because they'll be elsewhere.

    Restate your problem, which is not about how to log in, and
    you might get useful answers.

    Michael

  7. Re: login new user ?

    Jens Stueckelberger wrote:
    > For starters, you should learn why running always as root is a
    > VERY bad idea.


    The Natural Philosopher wrote:
    > Try telling that to initd...


    I'm trying to work out whether you're being facetious or serious.
    Chris

  8. Re: login new user ?

    problems@gmail wrote:
    > I always run as root, because the continual set-up changes
    > need the facilities of root.


    I always run as non-root, because it makes me stop and think slightly
    more before doing something as root that might break my laptop.


    > Now I want to setup some other 'users', mainly to get the
    > default file locations spread around different/better
    > 'roots'. So eg. If I login as emacs, then I'll get emacs'
    > files defaulting to /home/emacs.


    I must admit that I don't understand your philosophy here. Emacs surely
    doesn't own any files; rather, doesn't it help you edit /your/ files?

    Suppose I login as chris. I could have folders called Music, Work, Tax,
    and Fun in my home directory. In each of these I could have subfolders,
    and so on. Symlinks even allow me to have the same file apparently in two
    (or more) places, but that does tend to get a little messy.


    > Previously when I experimented how to login as non-root,
    > it was done at a VT. Now that I'm using an installation
    > that boots into X, I found the app. that setsup a new user;
    > but how do I login [swap-from-root] to user: emacs ?


    You don't, and this is where I think your work mode differs from what a
    Linux/Unix system can easily offer you.


    > I don't want to have to go-back to VT.
    > And I don't want an extra X to load.
    > I just want to quickly toggle between 'root' & 'emacs' users.


    > What should I do ?


    Login as a non-root user. Put all your files in directories within
    that user's home directory. Use "sudo" as a prefix for any command-line
    root operation, or let your GUI ask for the root password if you prefer
    working that way.

    Sudo is very powerful. You can configure it so that it doesn't ask you
    for a password for certain programs (aptitude, shutdown, mount,...) but
    to do so for others. Or you can dispense with the password prompting
    entirely. Either for one user or multiple users. If you're interested in
    going down this route I'm sure you can get specific help on that topic
    here if not out on the web.

    Incidentally, if you like groups of files under different bits of /home/,
    I suppose you could set your non-root user account to have /home as its
    home directory. This is at odds with the more normal procedure of having
    /home/{user} (for most values of {user}) as a user's home.

    Chris

  9. Re: login new user ?

    On Wed, 03 Sep 2008 18:08:54 +0100, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

    > Jens Stueckelberger wrote:
    >> On Wed, 03 Sep 2008 09:24:35 -0500, problems wrote:
    >>
    >>> I always run as root, because the continual set-up changes need the
    >>> facilities of root.
    >>> [Omitted.]
    >>> What should I do ?

    >>
    >> For starters, you should learn why running always as root is a
    >> VERY bad idea.
    >>
    >>

    > Try telling that to initd...


    If you are jesting then you need to work on your sense of humor.
    If you are not - as McEnroe would put it, you cannot be serious!


  10. Re: login new user ?

    On 2008-09-03, problems@gmail wrote:
    > I always run as root, because the continual set-up changes
    > need the facilities of root.
    >
    > Now I want to setup some other 'users', mainly to get the
    > default file locations spread around different/better
    > 'roots'. So eg. If I login as emacs, then I'll get emacs'
    > files defaulting to /home/emacs.
    >
    > Previously when I experimented how to login as non-root,
    > it was done at a VT. Now that I'm using an installation
    > that boots into X, I found the app. that setsup a new user;
    > but how do I login [swap-from-root] to user: emacs ?
    >
    > I don't want to have to go-back to VT.
    > And I don't want an extra X to load.
    > I just want to quickly toggle between 'root' & 'emacs' users.
    >
    > What should I do ?


    Log in as emacs; switch to root with:

    xterm -e sudo -i


    --
    Chris F.A. Johnson, author |
    Shell Scripting Recipes: | My code in this post, if any,
    A Problem-Solution Approach | is released under the
    2005, Apress | GNU General Public Licence

  11. Re: login new user ?

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    ["Followup-To:" header set to alt.os.linux.slackware.]
    On 2008-09-03, problems@gmail wrote:
    > I always run as root, because the continual set-up changes
    > need the facilities of root.
    >
    > Now I want to setup some other 'users', mainly to get the
    > default file locations spread around different/better
    > 'roots'. So eg. If I login as emacs, then I'll get emacs'
    > files defaulting to /home/emacs.


    Go buy a Mac. I'm serious. Linux will forever be beyond you.

    - --
    It is better to hear the rebuke of the wise,
    Than for a man to hear the song of fools.
    Ecclesiastes 7:5
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  12. Re: login new user ?

    problems@gmail writes:

    > Previously when I experimented how to login as non-root,
    > it was done at a VT. Now that I'm using an installation
    > that boots into X, I found the app. that setsup a new user;
    > but how do I login [swap-from-root] to user: emacs ?


    When you launch a new window, it can run any applicaiton, including su.

    > And I don't want an extra X to load.


    When you say "an extra X" do you mean an extra appliction?


    > I just want to quickly toggle between 'root' & 'emacs' users.


    Lots of ways. You can have different tabs in a XTERM-like window.
    You can have different XTERM windows running as different users.
    You can have different virtual desktops and switch between them.

    You can even launch a new non-X session vertual terminal
    by pressing control-Alt-F1, and then pressing Control-Alt-F7 (I think) to get
    back to the X windows session.

  13. Re: login new user ?

    Maxwell Lol wrote:
    > problems@gmail writes:
    >
    >> Previously when I experimented how to login as non-root,
    >> it was done at a VT. Now that I'm using an installation
    >> that boots into X, I found the app. that setsup a new user;
    >> but how do I login [swap-from-root] to user: emacs ?

    >
    > When you launch a new window, it can run any applicaiton, including su.
    >
    >> And I don't want an extra X to load.

    >
    > When you say "an extra X" do you mean an extra appliction?


    Think he meant an extra X session, i.e. session 1 on VT7, session 2 on VT8,
    etc.
    --
    | spike1@freenet.co,uk | "Are you pondering what I'm pondering Pinky?" |
    | Andrew Halliwell BSc | |
    | in | "I think so brain, but this time, you control |
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