ANNOUNCEMENT - New Slackware Book Scheduled for Mid-2009 - Slackware

This is a discussion on ANNOUNCEMENT - New Slackware Book Scheduled for Mid-2009 - Slackware ; notbob wrote: > The one item I'd like to see in the revised slack book is the > inclusion of a detailed section on how slack boots up. ... > ... > Also, we need a very thorough chapter on ...

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Thread: ANNOUNCEMENT - New Slackware Book Scheduled for Mid-2009

  1. Re: ANNOUNCEMENT - New Slackware Book Scheduled for Mid-2009

    notbob wrote:

    > The one item I'd like to see in the revised slack book is the
    > inclusion of a detailed section on how slack boots up. ...
    > ...
    > Also, we need a very thorough chapter on the whole hotplug/udev/hald
    > thing.
    > ...
    > Another thing. How to decrypt some of the gibberish. lspci and lsusb
    > and dmesg are all fine tools, but useless if one can't uderstand their
    > output.


    Along similar lines, I would vote for a comparison of pamd versus libnss
    and how someone adminning a Slackware system can work around some
    software that (at least in documentation) assumes the presence of pam.

    > Simple stuff like, "0xe000 is a memory location in octal" (it is,
    > isn't it?.


    Octal numbers are base-8, so "e000" is out of the range. It's a
    hexadecimal number (as designated by the leading "0x"). By itself (out
    of context) it is neither memory location nor I/O address, nor "value".
    It is simply a unitless hexadecimal number. On the other hand, the
    following lspci output, from my workstation at home, provides a good
    sampling of hexadecimal numbers in context:

    02:04.0 FireWire (IEEE 1394): VIA Technologies, Inc. IEEE 1394 Host
    Controller (rev 80) (prog-if 10 [OHCI])
    Subsystem: Hewlett-Packard Company: Unknown device 2a24
    Flags: bus master, medium devsel, latency 64, IRQ 19
    Memory at fddfe000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=2K]
    I/O ports at dd00 [size=128]

    "dd00" designates the first I/O address for this device, and "fddfe000"
    is "a memory location" (the lower address of memory on this device).
    "2a24" is simply a unitless number (used specifically as a device
    identifier).

    I hope that helps ...

    --
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Sylvain Robitaille syl@alcor.concordia.ca

    Network and Systems analyst Concordia University
    Instructional & Information Technology Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

  2. Re: ANNOUNCEMENT - New Slackware Book Scheduled for Mid-2009

    notbob wrote:
    > Also, we need a very thorough chapter on the whole hotplug/udev/hald thing.
    > I've read till I'm blue and still don't understand how they work or how to
    > write udev rules.




    first hit for the google search 'writing udev rules'. (the second hit is an
    older version of the same document.)


    --
    Joost Kremers joostkremers@yahoo.com
    Selbst in die Unterwelt dringt durch Spalten Licht
    EN:SiS(9)

  3. Re: ANNOUNCEMENT - New Slackware Book Scheduled for Mid-2009

    On Wed, 03 Sep 2008 23:43:14 +0000, notbob wrote:

    > On 2008-08-30, Mark Madsen wrote:
    >> Given that, Alan's original question may be rephrased as: "How can the
    >> Slackware book be made more useful to Slackware users?"

    >
    > The one item I'd like to see in the revised slack book is the inclusion
    > of a detailed section on how slack boots up. Which files are initiated
    > first, how to reboot certain aspects of the system without a cold
    > reboot, etc.


    Strongly agree. Especially since this is implicated in making Slack
    wireless somewhat arcane. (I asked a question about this a few months
    back and got a single - one-liner - reply, which suggests that not many
    denizens of this cave^H^H^H^Hgroup are terribly au fait with the startup
    sequence either.)

    > This page has long been in my bookmarks:
    >
    > http://openskill.info/infobox.php?ID=1042


    Good link, thanks.

    > ....couldn't hurt to put something similar in The Book.


    Plagiarise, plagiarise!
    Let no man's work evade your eyes
    So remember why the good lord made your eyes
    And plagiarise, plagiarise!
    Only remember please to always call it "research"! (*)

    > Also, we need a very thorough chapter on the whole hotplug/udev/hald
    > thing.


    FX: Boots running away to the sound of manic screaming. Both fade into
    the distance, and then, silence.

    (*) Tom Lehrer, although I suspect there is a line missing.

  4. wireless configuration and Slackware boot sequence (was Re: ANNOUNCEMENT ...)

    Mark Madsen wrote:

    >> The one item I'd like to see in the revised slack book is the
    >> inclusion of a detailed section on how slack boots up. ...

    >
    > Strongly agree. Especially since this is implicated in making Slack
    > wireless somewhat arcane. (I asked a question about this a few months
    > back and got a single - one-liner - reply, which suggests that not many
    > denizens of this cave^H^H^H^Hgroup are terribly au fait with the startup
    > sequence either.)


    What's arcane about wireless on Slackware? You configure your wireless
    interface, like any other, in /etc/rc.d/rc.inet1.conf, and you setup
    /etc/wpa_supplicant.conf as appropriate for the wireless networks you
    want to use.

    What am I missing?

    If you want to know details about your system's bootup sequence, start
    at inittab, then follow the entries for the run-level it's booting into.
    Read the startup scripts called from inittab, and any that those call.

    I hope this helps ...

    --
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Sylvain Robitaille syl@alcor.concordia.ca

    Network and Systems analyst Concordia University
    Instructional & Information Technology Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

  5. Re: ANNOUNCEMENT - New Slackware Book Scheduled for Mid-2009

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    Hash: SHA1

    Trim your quotes.

    On 2008-09-03, Richard Scott Smith wrote:
    > I've been working on a book that covers some of the more advanced stuff.
    > I emailed Alan Hicks about it, maybe a year(ish) ago, but I didn't get
    > any response.


    My apologies. I must have missed your mail or simply lost it among all
    the other messages I get daily.

    > Here is a sample table of contents as it compiles out of Latex right now:


    I'm not really looking to include anything like that you have here. It
    seems to me that most of what you have done details things that aren't
    even in Slackware. For example: scribus, NVIDIA/ATI drivers, ddclient,
    etc. are all valid topics to write about certainly, but don't fit the
    book because they are third-party tools. However I do appreciate the
    ideas you've expoused and will consider what changes they suggest I
    make to the book.

    - --
    It is better to hear the rebuke of the wise,
    Than for a man to hear the song of fools.
    Ecclesiastes 7:5
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  6. Re: wireless configuration and Slackware boot sequence (was Re: ANNOUNCEMENT ...)

    On 2008-09-04, Sylvain Robitaille wrote:
    > Mark Madsen wrote:
    >
    >>> The one item I'd like to see in the revised slack book is the
    >>> inclusion of a detailed section on how slack boots up. ...

    >>
    >> Strongly agree. Especially since this is implicated in making Slack
    >> wireless somewhat arcane. (I asked a question about this a few months
    >> back and got a single - one-liner - reply, which suggests that not many
    >> denizens of this cave^H^H^H^Hgroup are terribly au fait with the startup
    >> sequence either.)

    >
    > What's arcane about wireless on Slackware?

    Simple. You don't know how to do it until you know how to do it :-)

    > You configure your wireless interface, like any other, in
    > /etc/rc.d/rc.inet1.conf, and you setup /etc/wpa_supplicant.conf as
    > appropriate for the wireless networks you want to use.


    > What am I missing?

    Say you want a fixed IP in one wireless scenario and want to use DHCP
    in another. Can you do that?

    Maybe you can... a long time ago I wrote a shell script to set up my
    network connections because I could not figure out how to do what I
    want with the slackware init scripts. Maybe it can be done now, but I
    don't think it could then. (Slack 9.x? Slack 10.0? I don't recall
    any more.)

    Aside from the DHCP/fixed-IP issue, I need to use a different
    sendmail relay, I want different /etc/hosts.allow files, different
    resolv.conf files (for various fixed IP scenarios), different ntp.conf
    files, different IP forwarding and firewall rules, and so on,
    depending on where I am. And start up a VPN tunnel in some places but
    not others.

    So in the end, it seemed a lot simpler for me to write a custom shell
    script than to shoehorn all this into the rc.d scripts. (But in
    defence of slackware, I don't know if any other distribution has
    the capability to do what I want either.)

    Cheers.
    Jim


  7. Re: wireless configuration and Slackware boot sequence (was Re: ANNOUNCEMENT ...)

    Jim Diamond wrote:

    > Say you want a fixed IP in one wireless scenario and want to use DHCP
    > in another. Can you do that?


    I'm not sure, as I've never tried. If you give the interface an IP
    address by default, but also configure it for DHCP, that might work.
    I've not tested that, though.

    > Aside from the DHCP/fixed-IP issue, I need to use a different sendmail
    > relay, I want different /etc/hosts.allow files, different resolv.conf
    > files (for various fixed IP scenarios), different ntp.conf files,
    > different IP forwarding and firewall rules, and so on, depending on
    > where I am. And start up a VPN tunnel in some places but not others.


    Sounds like your needs are likely beyond most "typical" configurations.
    I think in your case any Linux distribution would seem "arcane", if
    we're defining "arcane" to mean that it can't do the above automatically
    without your spending a lot of time configuring and scripting.

    In your fixed-IP scenarios, could you not still use DHCP, but configure
    a DHCP server in those cases to always assign the same IP address? At
    least in those cases you could also have DHCP configure other items,
    such as SMTP server, DNS resolvers, time servers, etc. You'd have the
    benefit of a fixed address as well as that of dynamic configuration.

    > So in the end, it seemed a lot simpler for me to write a custom shell
    > script than to shoehorn all this into the rc.d scripts. (But in
    > defence of slackware, I don't know if any other distribution has the
    > capability to do what I want either.)


    The only other Linux distribution I have any real experience with
    setting up wireless networking on is the Asus-modified Xandros that
    comes on the EeePC. You would have to write custom scripts to get any
    of the above.

    --
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Sylvain Robitaille syl@alcor.concordia.ca

    Network and Systems analyst Concordia University
    Instructional & Information Technology Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

  8. Re: wireless configuration and Slackware boot sequence (was Re: ANNOUNCEMENT ...)

    Hallo, Sylvain,

    Du meintest am 05.09.08:

    >> Say you want a fixed IP in one wireless scenario and want to use
    >> DHCP in another. Can you do that?


    > I'm not sure, as I've never tried. If you give the interface an IP
    > address by default, but also configure it for DHCP, that might work.
    > I've not tested that, though.


    Usually DHCP uses a range from (p.e.) 192.168.0.60 to 192.168.0.240, it
    works from high to low numbers.

    If you give an interface a fixed IP address from the range 192.168.0.1
    to 192.168.0.59: that works.
    Then the client doesn't call for an IP address per DHCP.

    You shouldn't take a fixed address from the DHCP range - that may
    sometimes work, but not in all cases.

    I don't know how to realise "give the interface an IP address by
    default, but also configure it for DHCP".

    Viele Gruesse
    Helmut

    "Ubuntu" - an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".


  9. Re: wireless configuration and Slackware boot sequence (was Re:ANNOUNCEMENT ...)

    On Thu, 04 Sep 2008 16:55:29 +0000, Sylvain Robitaille wrote:

    > Mark Madsen wrote:
    >
    >>> The one item I'd like to see in the revised slack book is the
    >>> inclusion of a detailed section on how slack boots up. ...

    >>
    >> Strongly agree. Especially since this is implicated in making Slack
    >> wireless somewhat arcane. (I asked a question about this a few months
    >> back and got a single - one-liner - reply, which suggests that not many
    >> denizens of this cave^H^H^H^Hgroup are terribly au fait with the
    >> startup sequence either.)

    >
    > What's arcane about wireless on Slackware? You configure your wireless
    > interface, like any other, in /etc/rc.d/rc.inet1.conf, and you setup
    > /etc/wpa_supplicant.conf as appropriate for the wireless networks you
    > want to use.


    What's arcane is knowing how to do that, since it is Slackware-specific.
    I don't have a problem with doing it that way, but since it _is_
    Slackware-specific it could usefully be described in the Slackbook. (We
    are still talking about the Slackbook, aren't we?)

    > What am I missing?


    For one, the fact that there are several places under /etc/rc.d/ where
    one could conceivably insert the same network information (the same
    templates can be found in multiple locations), with little indication of
    which is the correct, or preferable location for the info.

    > If you want to know details about your system's bootup sequence, start
    > at inittab, then follow the entries for the run-level it's booting into.
    > Read the startup scripts called from inittab, and any that those call.


    I think my point was that it would be helpful to have an explanation
    along those lines in the Slackbook.


  10. Re: wireless configuration and Slackware boot sequence (was Re: ANNOUNCEMENT ...)

    Helmut Hullen wrote:

    > Usually DHCP uses a range from (p.e.) 192.168.0.60 to 192.168.0.240,
    > it works from high to low numbers.


    That depends on the server configuration. There certainly is no "usual"
    range, and in my own experience, I have seen no reason to interpret that
    it tends to follow any pattern such as "high to low numbers".

    > If you give an interface a fixed IP address from the range 192.168.0.1
    > to 192.168.0.59: that works. Then the client doesn't call for an IP
    > address per DHCP.


    Can you configure an IP address (any IP address, independant of what would
    be offered by the DHCP server) on the interface on the client system,
    then start a DHCP client for that interface? I've not tried that,
    but I imagine it would work.

    > You shouldn't take a fixed address from the DHCP range - that may
    > sometimes work, but not in all cases.


    You're correct here. It is more likely to cause trouble, at least in
    cases where one client can't know about all other client systems already
    on the network or that would join the network later.

    > I don't know how to realise "give the interface an IP address by
    > default, but also configure it for DHCP".


    IPADDR[0]="192.168.7.80"
    NETMASK[0]="255.255.255.0"
    USE_DHCP[0]="yes"

    --
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Sylvain Robitaille syl@alcor.concordia.ca

    Network and Systems analyst Concordia University
    Instructional & Information Technology Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

  11. Re: wireless configuration and Slackware boot sequence (was Re: ANNOUNCEMENT ...)

    Mark Madsen wrote:

    >> What's arcane about wireless on Slackware? You configure your wireless
    >> interface, like any other, in /etc/rc.d/rc.inet1.conf, and you setup
    >> /etc/wpa_supplicant.conf as appropriate for the wireless networks you
    >> want to use.

    >
    > What's arcane is knowing how to do that, since it is Slackware-specific.


    I agree that it's Slackware-specific, but I still don't see how it's (or
    how being Slackware-specific makes it) arcane.

    > I don't have a problem with doing it that way, but since it _is_
    > Slackware-specific it could usefully be described in the Slackbook.


    Yes, of course.

    > For one, the fact that there are several places under /etc/rc.d/ where
    > one could conceivably insert the same network information (the same
    > templates can be found in multiple locations), with little indication of
    > which is the correct, or preferable location for the info.


    Hrmmm... perhaps I have missed that.

    >> If you want to know details about your system's bootup sequence, start
    >> at inittab, then follow the entries for the run-level it's booting into.
    >> Read the startup scripts called from inittab, and any that those call.

    >
    > I think my point was that it would be helpful to have an explanation
    > along those lines in the Slackbook.


    I don't disagree, but that isn't really Slackware-specific (despite its
    appearance at first look).

    --
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Sylvain Robitaille syl@alcor.concordia.ca

    Network and Systems analyst Concordia University
    Instructional & Information Technology Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

  12. Re: wireless configuration and Slackware boot sequence (was Re:ANNOUNCEMENT ...)

    On Fri, 05 Sep 2008 15:39:58 +0000, Sylvain Robitaille wrote:

    > Mark Madsen wrote:
    >
    >>> What's arcane about wireless on Slackware? You configure your
    >>> wireless interface, like any other, in /etc/rc.d/rc.inet1.conf, and
    >>> you setup /etc/wpa_supplicant.conf as appropriate for the wireless
    >>> networks you want to use.

    >>
    >> What's arcane is knowing how to do that, since it is
    >> Slackware-specific.

    >
    > I agree that it's Slackware-specific, but I still don't see how it's (or
    > how being Slackware-specific makes it) arcane.


    I'm not continuing the discussion in order to argue, because I don't
    believe we have any actual disagreement going on here.

    The term "arcane" wasn't used pejoratively. The network setup consists
    of scripts that are specific to Slackware, and are therefore part of the
    arcana of Slackware.

    >> I don't have a problem with doing it that way, but since it _is_
    >> Slackware-specific it could usefully be described in the Slackbook.

    >
    > Yes, of course.


    See! You agree!

    >> For one, the fact that there are several places under /etc/rc.d/ where
    >> one could conceivably insert the same network information (the same
    >> templates can be found in multiple locations), with little indication
    >> of which is the correct, or preferable location for the info.

    >
    > Hrmmm... perhaps I have missed that.


    Check it out. I have been able to determine that certain ways of doing
    things will work, but not whether there are any ways which look right but
    won't work.

    Mostly I just use wicd (Robby Workman's package) and save the hassle.

    >>> If you want to know details about your system's bootup sequence, start
    >>> at inittab, then follow the entries for the run-level it's booting
    >>> into. Read the startup scripts called from inittab, and any that those
    >>> call.

    >>
    >> I think my point was that it would be helpful to have an explanation
    >> along those lines in the Slackbook.

    >
    > I don't disagree, but that isn't really Slackware-specific (despite its
    > appearance at first look).


    Hmm. It isn't like any of the other major distros, Debian and Ubuntu are
    both different (and from each other) and Fedora, Suse and Mandriva all
    seem to have significant differences.

    Anyway, I have probably said way too much on the subject already, and
    Alan would probably be better off writing his stuff than reading ours.

  13. Re: wireless configuration and Slackware boot sequence (was Re: ANNOUNCEMENT ...)

    Sylvain Robitaille wrote:
    > IPADDR[0]="192.168.7.80"
    > NETMASK[0]="255.255.255.0"
    > USE_DHCP[0]="yes"


    Won't work when you got a working DHCP server, as rc.inet1 tests for
    the USE_DHCP first and ONLY if it is NOT yes it will use the static
    IPADDR value.
    --
    ************************************************** *****************
    ** Eef Hartman, Delft University of Technology, dept. SSC/ICT **
    ** e-mail: E.J.M.Hartman@tudelft.nl, fax: +31-15-278 7295 **
    ** snail-mail: P.O. Box 5031, 2600 GA Delft, The Netherlands **
    ************************************************** *****************

  14. Re: wireless configuration and Slackware boot sequence (was Re: ANNOUNCEMENT ...)

    Mark Madsen wrote:

    > I'm not continuing the discussion in order to argue, ...


    discussion needn't be argument. I think we do basically agree, and I
    think we both have the same basic intention (to suggest ways in which we
    think the SLE book can be most useful to Slackware users).

    >>>> If you want to know details about your system's bootup sequence,
    >>>> start at inittab, ...

    >>
    >> ... but that isn't really Slackware-specific (despite its appearance
    >> at first look).

    >
    > Hmm. It isn't like any of the other major distros, ...


    It's a lot more similar than it appears at first glance. All of
    the distributions you mentioned use a system-5 based initd. So does
    Slackware. If I (or you) want to understand the boot sequence of any
    of these distributions, the place to start looking is inittab, and the
    scripts that it calls. This is an often misunderstood point about
    Slackware.

    > Alan would probably be better off writing his stuff than reading ours.


    Ah, just 'cause we're writing it doesn't mean he's reading it! ;-)

    --
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Sylvain Robitaille syl@alcor.concordia.ca

    Network and Systems analyst Concordia University
    Instructional & Information Technology Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

  15. Re: wireless configuration and Slackware boot sequence (was Re: ANNOUNCEMENT ...)

    Eef Hartman wrote:

    >> IPADDR[0]="192.168.7.80"
    >> NETMASK[0]="255.255.255.0"
    >> USE_DHCP[0]="yes"

    >
    > Won't work when you got a working DHCP server, as rc.inet1 tests for
    > the USE_DHCP first and ONLY if it is NOT yes it will use the static
    > IPADDR value.


    Thanks for clarifying. I see from a quick glance at rc.inet1 that it
    won't use the IPADDR setting at all if USE_DHCP = "yes". Hrmmm...
    that's not the sequence I would have expected, but there it is. :-(

    --
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Sylvain Robitaille syl@alcor.concordia.ca

    Network and Systems analyst Concordia University
    Instructional & Information Technology Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

  16. Re: wireless configuration and Slackware boot sequence (was Re: ANNOUNCEMENT ...)

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    Hash: SHA1

    On 2008-09-04, Jim Diamond wrote:
    > Aside from the DHCP/fixed-IP issue, I need to use a different
    > sendmail relay, I want different /etc/hosts.allow files, different
    > resolv.conf files (for various fixed IP scenarios), different ntp.conf
    > files, different IP forwarding and firewall rules, and so on,
    > depending on where I am. And start up a VPN tunnel in some places but
    > not others.


    I'm not sure that any Linux distro will support this in their init
    scripts; however, you might want to take a look at wicd. wicd is
    maturing and should be able to handle your needs. It's a python app
    with a daemon and a GUI client. I'm not certain how useful it would be
    if you're not running X, but it can handle all these sort of odd-ball
    cases with some tuning. wicd can run pre-connection, post-connection,
    and disconnection scripts based on the SSID of the wireless network
    you're connecting to. There should be a build script available at
    slackbuilds.org. Older versions placed everything in /opt, but I
    believe newer versions are storing things in /usr. HTH

    - --
    It is better to hear the rebuke of the wise,
    Than for a man to hear the song of fools.
    Ecclesiastes 7:5
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  17. Re: wireless configuration and Slackware boot sequence (was Re: ANNOUNCEMENT ...)

    On 2008-09-05, Sylvain Robitaille wrote:
    > Jim Diamond wrote:


    >> Aside from the DHCP/fixed-IP issue, I need to use a different sendmail
    >> relay, I want different /etc/hosts.allow files, different resolv.conf
    >> files (for various fixed IP scenarios), different ntp.conf files,
    >> different IP forwarding and firewall rules, and so on, depending on
    >> where I am. And start up a VPN tunnel in some places but not others.

    >
    > Sounds like your needs are likely beyond most "typical" configurations.

    Yes, but I don't think my needs are that unusual. I know some people
    get around automagically changing their SMTP server by using things
    like (*gag*) webmail when they are away from their LAN. (Titanic ;
    Hindenburg ; Edsel ; webmail ; ...)

    > I think in your case any Linux distribution would seem "arcane", if
    > we're defining "arcane" to mean that it can't do the above
    > automatically without your spending a lot of time configuring and
    > scripting.

    I don't think that is a good definition of arcane. But anyway ...

    > In your fixed-IP scenarios, could you not still use DHCP, but configure
    > a DHCP server in those cases to always assign the same IP address?

    My wireless router does not seem to allow me to configure it to always
    use the same IP. Yes, that is a shortcoming of the router, but there
    you go.

    > At least in those cases you could also have DHCP configure other
    > items, such as SMTP server, DNS resolvers, time servers, etc. You'd
    > have the benefit of a fixed address as well as that of dynamic
    > configuration.

    I'm even more certain that I can't get the DHCP server on my router to
    do any of that. Even if I could, I think (in my situation) a shell
    script is far easier to set up, and more or less as convenient on a
    day-to-day basic.

    >> So in the end, it seemed a lot simpler for me to write a custom shell
    >> script than to shoehorn all this into the rc.d scripts. (But in
    >> defence of slackware, I don't know if any other distribution has the
    >> capability to do what I want either.)

    > The only other Linux distribution I have any real experience with
    > setting up wireless networking on is the Asus-modified Xandros that
    > comes on the EeePC. You would have to write custom scripts to get
    > any of the above.

    And I suspect that is the case everywhere. But I don't think my
    situation is completely unusual, either... I think a lot of people
    tend to suffer through bad solutions to this problem, like the
    afore-mentioned (*gag*) webmail.

    Cheers.
    Jim

  18. Re: wireless configuration and Slackware boot sequence (was Re: ANNOUNCEMENT ...)

    On 2008-09-05, +Alan Hicks+ wrote:
    >
    > On 2008-09-04, Jim Diamond wrote:
    >> Aside from the DHCP/fixed-IP issue, I need to use a different
    >> sendmail relay, I want different /etc/hosts.allow files, different
    >> resolv.conf files (for various fixed IP scenarios), different ntp.conf
    >> files, different IP forwarding and firewall rules, and so on,
    >> depending on where I am. And start up a VPN tunnel in some places but
    >> not others.


    > I'm not sure that any Linux distro will support this in their init
    > scripts; however, you might want to take a look at wicd. wicd is
    > maturing and should be able to handle your needs. It's a python app
    > with a daemon and a GUI client. I'm not certain how useful it would be
    > if you're not running X, but it can handle all these sort of odd-ball
    > cases with some tuning. wicd can run pre-connection, post-connection,
    > and disconnection scripts based on the SSID of the wireless network
    > you're connecting to. There should be a build script available at
    > slackbuilds.org. Older versions placed everything in /opt, but I
    > believe newer versions are storing things in /usr. HTH


    Thanks for the pointer, I hadn't seen that one before. I'll take a
    closer look later, but it seems to cover the ground quite well. For
    anyone starting from scratch, it looks like the way to go; in my case,
    since I already have everything set up, the benefits aren't as clear.
    But I'm glad you mentioned it.

    Cheers.
    Jim

  19. Re: wireless configuration and Slackware boot sequence (was Re: ANNOUNCEMENT ...)

    On 2008-09-05, +Alan Hicks+ wrote:
    >
    > On 2008-09-04, Jim Diamond wrote:
    >> Aside from the DHCP/fixed-IP issue, I need to use a different
    >> sendmail relay, I want different /etc/hosts.allow files, different
    >> resolv.conf files (for various fixed IP scenarios), different ntp.conf
    >> files, different IP forwarding and firewall rules, and so on,
    >> depending on where I am. And start up a VPN tunnel in some places but
    >> not others.

    >
    > I'm not sure that any Linux distro will support this in their init
    > scripts; however, you might want to take a look at wicd. wicd is
    > maturing and should be able to handle your needs.



    ACK on that.


    > I'm not certain how useful it would be if you're not running X, but
    > it can handle all these sort of odd-ball cases with some tuning.



    I spent several hours writing man pages documenting the configuration
    file parameters and layout, so it's theoretically possible to set up
    everything from the command line (but I've not tested it personally).
    Once it's set up though, assuming you have the thing configured to
    connect automatically, it doesn't require X to be running at all in
    order to connect to *known* networks.

    Adam (one of the two main developers) is working on a command line
    client for it, so maybe when that matures, it will be just fine in
    that regard.


    > There should be a build script available at slackbuilds.org.



    Indeed there is, or I have packages for 12.1 on my site.


    > Older versions placed everything in /opt, but I believe newer
    > versions are storing things in /usr. HTH



    That is correct - 1.4.x used /opt/wicd, but 1.5.x uses correct
    FHS layout.

    -RW

  20. Re: ANNOUNCEMENT - New Slackware Book Scheduled for Mid-2009

    On Thu, 04 Sep 2008 17:02:33 +0000, +Alan Hicks+ wrote:

    > -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    > Hash: SHA1
    >
    > Trim your quotes.
    >
    > On 2008-09-03, Richard Scott Smith wrote:
    >> I've been working on a book that covers some of the more advanced
    >> stuff. I emailed Alan Hicks about it, maybe a year(ish) ago, but I
    >> didn't get any response.

    >
    > My apologies. I must have missed your mail or simply lost it among all
    > the other messages I get daily.
    >
    >> Here is a sample table of contents as it compiles out of Latex right
    >> now:

    >
    > I'm not really looking to include anything like that you have here. It
    > seems to me that most of what you have done details things that aren't
    > even in Slackware. For example: scribus, NVIDIA/ATI drivers, ddclient,
    > etc. are all valid topics to write about certainly, but don't fit the
    > book because they are third-party tools. However I do appreciate the
    > ideas you've expoused and will consider what changes they suggest I make
    > to the book.
    >
    > - --
    > It is better to hear the rebuke of the wise, Than for a man to hear the
    > song of fools. Ecclesiastes 7:5
    > -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
    > Version: GnuPG v1.4.9 (GNU/Linux)
    >
    > iEYEARECAAYFAkjAFKgACgkQrZS6hX/gvjpemwCg4flSRtIDwA3s815EO/C3j6NJ
    > GC4AoNPWYHVVOQ5CcfxLyST7uBK4pAaj
    > =WICX
    > -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----


    Thanks for the reply Alan.

    I understand the scope of the book you are trying to write. What I do
    represents some interesting uses of Slackware, but not necessarily
    Slackware itself.

    I will continue to write my book, because I use it. I will either submit
    it to a publisher or post it on my website. I have no idea when it will
    be done, but I'm shooting for the end of the year.

    Naturally, I have a fondness and dedication to using Slackware in what
    ever I do. I've noticed there are many questions in places such as Linux
    Questions where people are trying to do the things I've already figured
    out. I wondered if there wouldn't be more interest in some extensions of
    Slackware simply because most people use computers to _do_ things. I'm
    not suggesting you change the scope of your book. I've read the Official
    Slackware book and I like it. I represents one resource among many.

    My offer still stands. If there are pieces you need help writing or
    reviewing, feel free to keep me in mind. I'd be more than happy to help
    whereever I am able.

    Scott

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