mkinitrd for XFS root - Slackware

This is a discussion on mkinitrd for XFS root - Slackware ; I would like to know which modules do i need to pass with mkinitrd if the root partition of my linux is XFS. normally mkinitrd knows which it has to take when the filesystem is specified with -f option. the ...

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Thread: mkinitrd for XFS root

  1. mkinitrd for XFS root

    I would like to know which modules do i need to pass with mkinitrd if
    the root partition of my linux is XFS.

    normally mkinitrd knows which it has to take when the filesystem is
    specified with -f option.

    the command i used is the following:

    #mkinitrd -c -k 2.6.24.5-smp -m xfs -f xfs -r /dev/hda1

    but at load of linux it fails when mounting root.

    i think that's because i didn't specify all modules needed at mkinird.

  2. Re: mkinitrd for XFS root


    heavytull@hotmail.com wrote :

    > I would like to know which modules do i need to pass with mkinitrd if
    > the root partition of my linux is XFS.


    Which version of Slackware?

    You don't need to use mkinitrd any longer if you want to use XFS.
    --
    Thomas O.

    This area is designed to become quite warm during normal operation.

  3. Re: mkinitrd for XFS root

    On Aug 4, 11:04 pm, Thomas Overgaard wrote:
    > heavyt...@hotmail.com wrote :
    >
    > > I would like to know which modules do i need to pass with mkinitrd if
    > > the root partition of my linux is XFS.

    >
    > Which version of Slackware?

    slackware 12.1
    with kernel 2.6.24.5-smp

    >
    > You don't need to use mkinitrd any longer if you want to use XFS.

    ??
    why?
    linux actually uses a module called xfs when an xfs partition is
    present.

    > --
    > Thomas O.
    >
    > This area is designed to become quite warm during normal operation.



  4. Re: mkinitrd for XFS root


    heavytull@hotmail.com wrote :

    > slackware 12.1
    > with kernel 2.6.24.5-smp
    >

    My bad, it turns out that I by old habit has chosen the huge-smp kernel
    and this kernel has build-in support for XFS so no ramdisk is needed.

    > linux actually uses a module called xfs when an xfs partition is
    > present.


    Not if its compiled into the kernel. I'm a bit rusty here but I has used
    a ramdisk to load XFS support but its years ago but I think it was
    something like:
    mkinitrd -m xfs
    Or maybe:
    mkinitrd -m exportfs:xfs
    --
    Thomas O.

    This area is designed to become quite warm during normal operation.

  5. Re: mkinitrd for XFS root

    On Mon, 04 Aug 2008 13:16:06 -0700, heavytull wrote:

    > I would like to know which modules do i need to pass with mkinitrd if
    > the root partition of my linux is XFS.
    >
    > normally mkinitrd knows which it has to take when the filesystem is
    > specified with -f option.
    >
    > the command i used is the following:
    >
    > #mkinitrd -c -k 2.6.24.5-smp -m xfs -f xfs -r /dev/hda1
    >

    That looks right to me. I tested a similar initrd on a system that I
    use which is using XFS as root and it worked without a hitch. I was
    testing under Slackware 12.0, which AFAIK is very similar to 12.1.
    I checked the modules.dep file, and AFAICT xfs has no other dependancies.
    >
    > but at load of linux it fails when mounting root.
    >

    Fails how? With a kernel panic?
    >
    > i think that's because i didn't specify all modules needed at mkinird.
    >

    Note: two comments inline.

    The bootup messages scroll by pretty fast, but did you see a message
    saying that XFS is loaded? If not, then there is something wrong with
    either your initrd or the parameters given to your bootloader.

    In general terms, there are various things that can be broken:

    1. You may need a module for your specific disk controller device. This
    shouldn't be the case for common IDE and SATA controllers.

    2. You may have neglected to fixup your bootloader completely and correctly.
    If your bootloader has missing information, then it can't be expected to
    guess. Note: lilo requires more fixups when making these changes
    than grub. Which bootloader are you using?

    3. It could be something else. Check the directory /boot/initrd-tree to see if
    anything is out of the ordinary. Check the file, load_kernel_modules, etc.
    You can always manually make corrections and rebuild from this tree using
    cpio directly:

    (cd /boot/initrd-tree && find . | cpio -o -H newc | gzip -c) >/boot/initrd.gz

    --
    Douglas Mayne

  6. Re: mkinitrd for XFS root

    On Aug 5, 10:28 pm, Douglas Mayne wrote:
    > On Mon, 04 Aug 2008 13:16:06 -0700, heavytull wrote:
    > > I would like to know which modules do i need to pass with mkinitrd if
    > > the root partition of my linux is XFS.

    >
    > > normally mkinitrd knows which it has to take when the filesystem is
    > > specified with -f option.

    >
    > > the command i used is the following:

    >
    > > #mkinitrd -c -k 2.6.24.5-smp -m xfs -f xfs -r /dev/hda1

    alright, there was nothing wrong here.

    i did it again and it worked straight forward.

    I might have done something wrong. but i don't know what.

    >
    > That looks right to me. I tested a similar initrd on a system that I
    > use which is using XFS as root and it worked without a hitch. I was
    > testing under Slackware 12.0, which AFAIK is very similar to 12.1.
    > I checked the modules.dep file, and AFAICT xfs has no other dependancies.
    >
    > > but at load of linux it fails when mounting root.

    >
    > Fails how? With a kernel panic?
    >
    > > i think that's because i didn't specify all modules needed at mkinird.

    >
    > Note: two comments inline.
    >
    > The bootup messages scroll by pretty fast, but did you see a message
    > saying that XFS is loaded? If not, then there is something wrong with
    > either your initrd or the parameters given to your bootloader.
    >
    > In general terms, there are various things that can be broken:
    >
    > 1. You may need a module for your specific disk controller device. This
    > shouldn't be the case for common IDE and SATA controllers.
    >
    > 2. You may have neglected to fixup your bootloader completely and correctly.
    > If your bootloader has missing information, then it can't be expected to
    > guess. Note: lilo requires more fixups when making these changes
    > than grub. Which bootloader are you using?
    >
    > 3. It could be something else. Check the directory /boot/initrd-tree to see if
    > anything is out of the ordinary. Check the file, load_kernel_modules, etc.
    > You can always manually make corrections and rebuild from this tree using
    > cpio directly:
    >
    > (cd /boot/initrd-tree && find . | cpio -o -H newc | gzip -c) >/boot/initrd.gz
    >
    > --
    > Douglas Mayne


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