Laptop - Slackware

This is a discussion on Laptop - Slackware ; My daughter would like a laptop for her birthday, Dell do an Inspiron 1525 that I could afford, (I'm going to have to pay for the connection in her cottage and a router as well), which looks as if it ...

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 27

Thread: Laptop

  1. Laptop

    My daughter would like a laptop for her birthday, Dell do an Inspiron
    1525 that I could afford, (I'm going to have to pay for the connection
    in her cottage and a router as well), which looks as if it can do all
    she wants, read and send via Googlemail, browse the web, some word
    processing which I could then run on my printer for her. The Dell
    brochure states it has a 160 gig hard drive, so I could leave whatever
    form of Microsoft® it comes with in place and set up dual boot
    Slackware for her.

    Anyone had any experience on such matters? All comments welcomed.
    --
    Two Ravens
    "...hit the squirrel..."

  2. Re: Laptop


    Two Ravens wrote :

    > Anyone had any experience on such matters?


    Not with a Dell, but back when I needed some windows programs for to
    work from home I dual-booted Slackware and XP. Worked perfect.

    > All comments welcomed.


    Its probably not interesting for a Slackware user but Dell has build a
    DVD-iso with Ubuntu-gutsy for this laptop:

    --
    Thomas O.

    This area is designed to become quite warm during normal operation.

  3. Re: Laptop

    On Sat, 14 Jun 2008 17:13:09 +0100, Two Ravens wrote:

    >
    > Anyone had any experience on such matters? All comments welcomed.


    I have had a Dell E1505 for 1 1/2 years. I dual-boot XP and Slackware
    11, 12, and now 12.1. My machine is different from yours so I'll just
    make some general comments:

    Choose the intel wireless option over anything else - I have the Pro
    Wireless 3945 which now has a driver in the kernel. You'll avoid many
    headaches.

    My laptop came with the ATI Radeon X1400 video driver. I have not had
    too many problems, but ATI is still a pain in the ass compared to nvidia.
    If you have the option, choose nvidia over ATI.

    As I understand it, Vista is a bit trickier to set up with linux as a
    dual boot system, but it can be done. Do some googling for Vista
    specific instructions. On the otherhand, if you can still "downgrade" to
    XP you might want to do that - for a variety of reasons. Others may
    disagree.

    If this is an intel chipset (mine is ICH7) you may get the intel HDA sound.
    Depending on the codec type and your ears, you may be less than
    enthusiastic about it. Mine is working fine with acceptable sound in
    linux and XP. Others have had less than stellar results with the HDA
    sound, but this seems to be variable depending on the codec you get. You
    won't likely get much choice here. I'm not sure what the AMD setups come
    with for sound.

    Dell support is what it is. I never needed it so I don't care. I heard
    some horror stories, but I have nothing first-hand to report one way or
    another.

    HTH






  4. Re: Laptop

    stinger wrote:
    >
    > As I understand it, Vista is a bit trickier to set up with linux as a
    > dual boot system, but it can be done. Do some googling for Vista


    I read somewhere before Vista came out that it would be trickier, but when I
    got a new computer last summer, I didn't do anthing different than in the
    past when I used to dual boot (I went about 7 or more years with just Linux -
    I figured I'd leave Windoz on with the new computer just in case it came in
    handy). Vista actually had some built non-destructive partitioning
    capabilities - that really suck. I had to use a special defrag program to
    remove some unmovable **** Vista had placed all the way on the end of
    the hard drive of this completely new setup. I think they did that on
    purpose to make it harder to install another OS.

    - Kurt

  5. Re: Laptop

    Two Ravens wrote:

    > Anyone had any experience on such matters? All comments welcomed.


    Thanks for all the help so far, I'm still exploring possibilities in the
    UK. there are some manufacturers, I understand, who sell a laptop
    without an operating system, I'm looking into that.
    --
    Two Ravens
    "...hit the squirrel..."

  6. Re: Laptop

    On Sun, 15 Jun 2008 08:24:08 +0100, Two Ravens wrote:

    > Thanks for all the help so far, I'm still exploring possibilities in the
    > UK. there are some manufacturers, I understand, who sell a laptop
    > without an operating system, I'm looking into that.


    Dell is selling the inspiron 1525 10% cheaper with ubuntu than with
    windows, if you are interested in it, look at their website...
    http://ecomm.euro.dell.com/dellstore...f-47e203c9886c

  7. Re: Laptop

    Check here http://www.linux-laptop.net/.

    Now my experience - I have a X300 DELL and since I bought it, over 3
    years ago, I dual boot with XP. The installation was flawless and
    trouble free.

    George


  8. Re: Laptop


    Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8Bit


    Two Ravens wrote:

    >My daughter would like a laptop for her birthday, Dell do an Inspiron
    >1525 that I could afford, (I'm going to have to pay for the connection
    >in her cottage and a router as well), which looks as if it can do all
    >she wants, read and send via Googlemail, browse the web, some word
    >processing which I could then run on my printer for her. The Dell
    >brochure states it has a 160 gig hard drive, so I could leave whatever
    >form of Microsoft® it comes with in place and set up dual boot
    >Slackware for her.
    >
    >Anyone had any experience on such matters? All comments welcomed.


    Look into the Asus Eee running EeeXubuntu.

    Also look into Zenwalk Linux as an alternative that
    out-Slackwares Slackware.


  9. Re: Laptop

    On Sat, 14 Jun 2008 17:13:09 +0100, Two Ravens wrote:

    > My daughter would like a laptop for her birthday, Dell do an Inspiron
    > 1525 that I could afford, (I'm going to have to pay for the connection
    > in her cottage and a router as well), which looks as if it can do all
    > she wants, read and send via Googlemail, browse the web, some word
    > processing which I could then run on my printer for her. The Dell
    > brochure states it has a 160 gig hard drive, so I could leave whatever
    > form of Microsoft® it comes with in place and set up dual boot
    > Slackware for her.
    >
    > Anyone had any experience on such matters? All comments welcomed.
    >

    I have had good luck with Dell's Latitude line. The last I bought were
    D610s, with the Pentium M CPU. These are well supported by Linux, and are
    still going strong. I have also looked at the recent Latitude line, which
    have Core 2 Duo CPUs, and IIRC are about $1k (fully configured). These
    look like a substantial performance upgrade over D610. BTW, the sound
    support of this class of computer (with intel hd audio) was criticized on
    this newsgroup recently.

    There may be some politics of what OS to choose. IME, it doesn't work
    to force GNU/Linux on those who have no interest in it. BTW, and IIRC,
    Friday was the cutoff to buy a Dell with MS Windows XP. Perhaps, they may
    still be offering a "downgrade right," I don't know. BTW, I have met more
    than one person who would like to avoid running Vista- and that have
    installed XP instead. Other people I know have voluntarily chosen
    GNU/Linux to get the freedoms offered by the platform. If sticking with
    Windows and you would be the person who is supporting the system, then
    having a backup of "known good state" should be one of the first items to
    do after receiving the laptop. Images of this type are easy to obtain
    using a live CD with the ntfsclone available. (Slax is a good tool for
    this, IMO.)

    But, as you point out, if the set of applications which will be used is
    limited to web, email, office suite, graphics, sound/video, then I don't
    know why GNU/Linux is not getting more attention. Here are a couple of
    screenshots of my desktop (Dropline Gnome on Slackware 12):

    http://www.xmission.com/~ddmayne2/im...8-06-20.01.png
    http://www.xmission.com/~ddmayne2/im...8-06-20.02.png

    BTW, this is running on a P3 class computer that I got from
    university surplus property for $20.

    --
    Douglas Mayne

  10. Re: Laptop

    On Sun, 15 Jun 2008 14:53:07 +0000, invalid wrote:

    > Look into the Asus Eee running EeeXubuntu.


    **** that. Those things are just shiny little toys.

    > Also look into Zenwalk Linux as an alternative that
    > out-Slackwares Slackware.


    Ummm, right....... Why would he need an "alternative"?


    --
    "Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".
    Now filtering out all posts originating from Google Groups.
    The Usenet Improvement Project: http://improve-usenet.org


  11. Re: Laptop

    On Sun, 15 Jun 2008 13:26:10 -0500, Dan C wrote:

    > On Sun, 15 Jun 2008 14:53:07 +0000, invalid wrote:
    >
    >> Look into the Asus Eee running EeeXubuntu.

    >
    > **** that. Those things are just shiny little toys.


    True. Except that you can get them in matt black as well. And they are
    toys that have hardware that works really nicely with a variety of Linux
    distros (EeeXubuntu and Mandriva and many others, including Slackware).
    And they don't cost much, and only weigh 2 lbs.

    So they are a pretty good alternative for many people, especially those
    with normal eyesight and slim fingers. And coffee-shop surfers/bloggers/
    writers. And wardrivers. And people who do a lot of presentations. And
    people who like to have their machine with them at all times. You get
    the idea.

    >> Also look into Zenwalk Linux as an alternative that out-Slackwares
    >> Slackware.

    >
    > Ummm, right....... Why would he need an "alternative"?


    It's been said that Zenwalk is slightly easier to get started with for a
    newbie, and it may be true for all I know. They do a liveCD called
    Zenlive if anyone wants to check it out. Depends how much of a purist
    one is.

  12. Re: Laptop

    Douglas Mayne wrote:

    snip
    > There may be some politics of what OS to choose. IME, it doesn't work
    > to force GNU/Linux on those who have no interest in it. BTW, and IIRC,
    > Friday was the cutoff to buy a Dell with MS Windows XP. Perhaps, they
    > may still be offering a "downgrade right," I don't know. BTW, I have
    > met more than one person who would like to avoid running Vista- and
    > that have installed XP instead. Other people I know have voluntarily
    > chosen GNU/Linux to get the freedoms offered by the platform. If
    > sticking with Windows and you would be the person who is supporting
    > the system, then having a backup of "known good state" should be one
    > of the first items to do after receiving the laptop. Images of this
    > type are easy to obtain using a live CD with the ntfsclone available.
    > (Slax is a good tool for this, IMO.)

    snip

    As my daughter has been living at home and has been using my computer,
    Slackware 12.1 up to now there will be no problem in her having to
    re-learn to use GNU/Linux as she already does. there would be a problem
    if she had a problem with Microsoft®, as I have had no experience of it
    since mine crashed and wouldn't restart, so went looking for something
    else and started with Slackware 7 she would then have no would have to
    either learn to get it running herself or take to someone who can,
    usually costly I understand!

    This is looking to be a good buy at the moment:-
    http://www.novatech.co.uk/novatech/s...e.html?NNB-587
    --
    Two Ravens
    "...hit the squirrel..."

  13. Re: Laptop

    invalid@example.com wrote:

    > Look into the Asus Eee running EeeXubuntu.


    Dan C and Mark Madsen also passed comment on the Asus Eee, however it
    didn't meet my daughters needs she found the minimum size screen she
    was comfortable with was 14", she also preferred to use a 'proper'
    mouse.

    See my earlier post to this thread for what I'm investigating at the
    moment which looks as if it meets her minimum requirements and dosen't
    cost the earth, about US $490.00.
    --
    Two Ravens
    "...hit the squirrel..."

  14. Re: Laptop

    On Mon, 16 Jun 2008 08:28:04 +0100, Two Ravens wrote:

    > Douglas Mayne wrote:
    >
    > snip
    >> There may be some politics of what OS to choose. IME, it doesn't work
    >> to force GNU/Linux on those who have no interest in it. BTW, and IIRC,
    >> Friday was the cutoff to buy a Dell with MS Windows XP. Perhaps, they
    >> may still be offering a "downgrade right," I don't know. BTW, I have
    >> met more than one person who would like to avoid running Vista- and
    >> that have installed XP instead. Other people I know have voluntarily
    >> chosen GNU/Linux to get the freedoms offered by the platform. If
    >> sticking with Windows and you would be the person who is supporting
    >> the system, then having a backup of "known good state" should be one
    >> of the first items to do after receiving the laptop. Images of this
    >> type are easy to obtain using a live CD with the ntfsclone available.
    >> (Slax is a good tool for this, IMO.)

    > snip
    >
    > As my daughter has been living at home and has been using my computer,
    > Slackware 12.1 up to now there will be no problem in her having to
    > re-learn to use GNU/Linux as she already does. there would be a problem
    > if she had a problem with Microsoft®, as I have had no experience of it
    > since mine crashed and wouldn't restart, so went looking for something
    > else and started with Slackware 7 she would then have no would have to
    > either learn to get it running herself or take to someone who can,
    > usually costly I understand!
    >
    > This is looking to be a good buy at the moment:-
    > http://www.novatech.co.uk/novatech/s...e.html?NNB-587
    >

    Good to see they're offering a substantial discount for the "no OS
    installed" option.

    Here are a couple of extra items to consider and/or check into.

    Since your daughter has experience with Slackware, I recommend forgoing
    setting up "dual boot" altogether. If something comes up which actually
    requires MS Windows at school, then use a virtual machine (under VMWare,
    server or workstation). There are also other virtualization options, too-
    but, IMO, VMWare is the leader. You'll need a Windows license to run it in
    a VM. Keep in mind that a lot of schools have volume license contracts
    with MS and she probably could get the license substantially cheaper that
    way. For some hints about setting up VMs, there have been several help
    articles about setting up VMWare on Slackware, including in "The Slack
    World."

    The other big advantage to using GNU/Linux is the ability to encrypt all
    partitions. A lost computer with personal information appears to have the
    same risk factors as a lost wallet/purse. Encryption keeps your private
    files locked when not in use. That's good for peace of mind.

    --
    Douglas Mayne

  15. Re: Laptop

    Two Ravens wrote:
    > My daughter would like a laptop for her birthday, Dell do an Inspiron
    > 1525 that I could afford, (I'm going to have to pay for the connection
    > in her cottage and a router as well), which looks as if it can do all
    > she wants, read and send via Googlemail, browse the web, some word
    > processing which I could then run on my printer for her. The Dell
    > brochure states it has a 160 gig hard drive, so I could leave whatever
    > form of Microsoft® it comes with in place and set up dual boot
    > Slackware for her.
    >
    > Anyone had any experience on such matters? All comments welcomed.
    >

    Latitude, no, Inspiron (6000), yes -- it's been through Slackware 10.x,
    11.x, 12.0 and now 12.1 and it works just fine (if a little slower than
    my desk top box, but that's the difference between a 3 GHz processor
    with 2 G of RAM and a 1.6 GHz processor with 512 M of RAM). It came with
    XP, I don't use it for anything but stamps.com and constant critical
    updates but it does dual boot (with lilo) and either OS does what it's
    supposed to.

    Although I've all my systems hard-wired to a router I have lugged the
    laptop around and used it with WICD where folks have wi-fi available
    with no problems -- you might want to look at setting up a wi-fi router
    and have her use that rather than running wires (if that's what you're
    thinking of doing) because, I think, all Dell laptops come with the
    built-in wi-fi transceiver. Just a thought, but it wouldn't hurt to
    install WICD for her while you're at it.

    What I did do was shrink XP to 5 G (10 G might be a little better if she
    used Windows for more than a doorstop), created a 1 G swap partition
    (I'm old-fashioned, I do swap at 2x RAM whether it's needed or not and
    with 160 G, who cares) and allocate the rest to Linux in one partition.
    That has advantages and disadvantages in that my other machines have
    individual partitions for (at least) /opt, /usr/local, /home and
    /var/lib/mysql so I can install a new Slackware release without wiping
    out the content of those (you just don't format them during setup) but I
    use scp to copy the stuff I care about on the laptop from a "master"
    box; works for me, may not work for your daughter so you might want to
    consider partitioning.

    I am grateful to Robby Workman for all the work he does and I install
    his OpenOffice.org and WICD packages and they work just fine.

    Other than that, I can't stand those finger pads so I keep a USB wheel
    mouse plugged in and both work just fine out of the box at the same time.

    Hope some of this helps.

    Thomas

  16. Re: Laptop

    Douglas Mayne wrote:

    > Here are a couple of extra items to consider and/or check into.
    >
    > Since your daughter has experience with Slackware, I recommend
    > forgoing setting up "dual boot" altogether.


    I've ordered the No OS version so its all going to be Slackware, or
    GNU/Linux at least, I've never installed anything on a laptop so we
    might run into hardware problems, in which case I'll be back.

    > If something comes up which actually requires MS Windows at school,


    Over 21 so school no longer an issue.

    > The other big advantage to using GNU/Linux is the ability to encrypt
    > all partitions. A lost computer with personal information appears to
    > have the same risk factors as a lost wallet/purse. Encryption keeps
    > your private files locked when not in use. That's good for peace of
    > mind.


    This had not occurred to me, (she needs a Laptop as it's a tiny little
    cottage she's moved into), and as I have yet to work out how to get
    GnuPG to work it will be a learning curve for us both. There is also
    the connection problem my ISP say that as her village is further from
    the exchange than mine is, the best they can hope for, or will take an
    order for is 250 Kbps, I get 6604.81 Kbps, I'm just trying to work out
    with the ISP if dial up would be better value for her.

    --
    Two Ravens
    "...hit the squirrel..."

  17. Re: Laptop

    On 2008-06-15, invalid@example.com wrote:
    >
    > Also look into Zenwalk Linux as an alternative that
    > out-Slackwares Slackware.



    That's bull****.

    Zenwalk is just another "fork" that takes each new Slackware release
    and "bases on" it. If Slackware development were to stop, each of
    those forks would die a slow death.

    -RW

  18. Re: Laptop


    Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8Bit


    Robby Workman wrote:
    >
    >invalid@example.com wrote:
    >>
    >> Also look into Zenwalk Linux as an alternative that
    >> out-Slackwares Slackware.

    >
    >That's bull****.
    >
    >Zenwalk is just another "fork" that takes each new Slackware release
    >and "bases on" it. If Slackware development were to stop, each of
    >those forks would die a slow death.


    What does that have to do with the question of whether Zenwalk
    out-Slackwares Slackware? I think it does. It goes further
    down the KISS path that makes Slackware so much easier to
    maintain than, say, redhat. I used the term ''alternative''
    quite deliberately; I am not saying Zenwalk is better than
    slackware -- it isn't -- but I am saying that it is a good
    alternative for those who like the simplicity of Slackware
    and want to try something even simpler.

    From various reviews of Zenwalk:

    ''Zenwalk is different. It has the traditional stability and speed
    of Slackware – on my 2GHz AMD Athlon XP2800 it positively flies
    along. But the Zenwalk philosophy - provide one tool per task,
    and keep the system simple to administer and maintain – means
    it's a much more user/newbie-friendly distribution.''


    ''I have used Slackware for several years. I loved it. However,
    I felt that Slackware was somewhat "bloated". As my wife stated,
    "Why is there so many programs to do the same thing. I just
    need one program that does it best". For the most part, that is
    Zenwalk's philosophy. One program to do the job. One can argue
    that OpenOffice Writer is better than Abiword (Zenwalk standard),
    OpenOffice Calc is better than Gnumeric (Zenwalk standard), or
    that Mplayer is better than Gzine (Zenwalk standard). If you are
    more comfortable with your favorite program, install it. (If
    most of my documents hadn't been saved in OpenOffice's format,
    I probably would have been happy with Abiword and Gnumeric.)
    To me, I don't think that I will go back to Slackware. I am very
    happy with Zenwalk.''


    '' Zenwalk 5.0: Slackware Made Somewhat Easier

    I tried Zenwalk back at v3.0 and liked it. It was a fast, sleek,
    minimalist OS based on Slackware, but supposedly only aimed at
    more technically advanced users. ... For those who aren't familiar
    with Zenwalk, here's a brief explanation: Zenwalk is a one-CD
    installation of Slackware which has a philosophy of only including
    one program for each task. It was originally called MiniSlack in
    the pre-1.0 days when it shipped with WindowMaker as the desktop.
    Now, it's based on XFCE, supposedly has much better hardware
    detection, and is a more complete desktop overall. It's still
    based loosely on Slackware, using Slackware's packaging system
    and using LILO instead of GRUB as the boot loader, but it's a
    more complete OS out of the box, despite being smaller.
    ....
    Zenwalk has a meticulously-trimmed software selection, but that
    doesn't mean it's incomplete. No way. Wolvix 1.1 "Hunter Edition",
    for example, is far from incomplete, and it only takes up 480MB
    on the CD. Zenwalk uses a simple philosophy: "You only need one
    program for each task." That means there's only one web browser
    (IceWeasel), only one image editor (GIMP), only one IM-ing
    client (Pidgin)... But there are a lot of categories. Zenwalk
    comes with an FTP client (gFTP), CD burner (Brasero), CD ripper
    (Asunder, which I'd never even heard of before)... On the codec
    side, MP3 playback is flawless (assuming your sound works), but
    Flash needs to be installed manually since it isn't open-source
    (and won't be until Gnash is stable). Suffice it to say that
    Zenwalk is a complete desktop and a half.

    Hardware support in Zenwalk is good considering its KISS (Keep
    It Simple, Stupid!) philosophy. I only had to do a little
    tinkering in xorg.conf to make X recognize my screen resolution
    and stop it from annoyingly switching it off. My wireless card
    was detected, but I had to mess around with iwconfig (only one
    command) and wicd (a GUI for wireless connections, like
    NetworkManager) to get it set up. Sound worked without a hitch.''

    Again I say; alternative. Not better. Just different.


  19. Re: Laptop

    On 2008-06-17, invalid@example.com wrote:
    >
    > Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8Bit
    >
    >
    > Robby Workman wrote:
    >>
    >>invalid@example.com wrote:
    >>>
    >>> Also look into Zenwalk Linux as an alternative that
    >>> out-Slackwares Slackware.

    >>
    >>That's bull****.
    >>
    >>Zenwalk is just another "fork" that takes each new Slackware release
    >>and "bases on" it. If Slackware development were to stop, each of
    >>those forks would die a slow death.

    >
    > What does that have to do with the question of whether Zenwalk
    > out-Slackwares Slackware?

    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    > Again I say; alternative. Not better. Just different.



    You just implied that Zenwalk is better than Slackware.

    -Matt

  20. Re: Laptop

    On 2008-06-17, Matt Hayes wrote:
    > On 2008-06-17, invalid@example.com wrote:
    >>
    >> Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8Bit
    >>
    >>
    >> Robby Workman wrote:
    >>>
    >>>invalid@example.com wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>> Also look into Zenwalk Linux as an alternative that
    >>>> out-Slackwares Slackware.
    >>>
    >>>That's bull****.
    >>>
    >>>Zenwalk is just another "fork" that takes each new Slackware release
    >>>and "bases on" it. If Slackware development were to stop, each of
    >>>those forks would die a slow death.

    >>
    >> What does that have to do with the question of whether Zenwalk
    >> out-Slackwares Slackware?

    > ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    >> Again I say; alternative. Not better. Just different.

    >
    >
    > You just implied that Zenwalk is better than Slackware.
    >
    > -Matt


    Different people read it differently....I read it to mean that zenwalk is
    more minimalist in approach than slack not better as in quality.

    ken

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast