EFI, sda1, and sda5 - Slackware

This is a discussion on EFI, sda1, and sda5 - Slackware ; I'm close to fritzing my system I've got an iMac. Here's my output of parted print: Model: ATA ST3250824AS Q (scsi) Disk /dev/sda: 250GB Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B Partition Table: gpt Number Start End Size File system Name Flags 1 ...

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Thread: EFI, sda1, and sda5

  1. EFI, sda1, and sda5

    I'm close to fritzing my system

    I've got an iMac. Here's my output of parted print:
    Model: ATA ST3250824AS Q (scsi)
    Disk /dev/sda: 250GB
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B
    Partition Table: gpt

    Number Start End Size File system Name Flags
    1 20.5kB 210MB 210MB fat32 EFI System Partition boot
    2 210MB 63.1GB 62.9GB ext3 boot
    4 63.1GB 111GB 47.8GB ext3 boot
    3 111GB 114GB 3061MB linux-swap(new)
    5 114GB 250GB 136GB hfs+ Apple_HFS_Untitled_4


    First question: how do I mount /dev/sda1? If I do
    mount -t fat32 /dev/sda1 sda1
    I get
    mount: unknown filesystem type 'fat32'
    mount: maybe you meant 'vfat'?
    If I type
    mount -t vfat /dev/sda1 sda1
    I get
    mount: wrong fs type, bad option, bad superblock on /dev/sda1,
    missing codepage or other error
    In some cases useful info is found in syslog - try
    dmesg | tail or so

    Next question: how do I create a device node for my Apple partition? I
    tried:
    mknod /dev/sda5 b 8 5
    chown :disk /dev/sda5
    chmod g+w /dev/sda5
    chmod o-r /dev/sda5
    mkdir /mnt/sda5
    But when I type
    mount -t hfsplus /dev/sda5 /mnt/sda5
    it says:
    mount: /dev/sda5 is not a valid block device

    The problem is, I've somewhat fried my EFI, so I can no longer boot to
    my iMac partition. I had installed grub2, so I can boot my system.
    Without being able to access sda1 or sda5, it makes it difficult for me
    to tweak anything further.

    The system is gradually falling into entropy.



  2. Re: EFI, sda1, and sda5

    Mark Carter wrote:

    > The problem is, I've somewhat fried my EFI, so I can no longer boot to
    > my iMac partition.


    The good news is that the Leopard CD comes with a little menu item so
    that you can reinstate Leopard rebooting. Then one can reinstall rEFIt.
    This brings everything back, and then some. I've now got a smorgasboard
    of boot options, some of which actually seem to work.

    Not necessarily what you'd call "streamlined".

  3. Re: EFI, sda1, and sda5

    Mark Carter wrote:
    > I'm close to fritzing my system
    >
    > I've got an iMac. Here's my output of parted print:


    Have you tried virtualbox and Linux as ghost?
    http://www.macwindows.com/virtualboxbeta.html

    ---
    Bogdan

  4. Re: EFI, sda1, and sda5

    B.Yanchitsky@gmail.com wrote:
    > Mark Carter wrote:
    >> I'm close to fritzing my system
    >>
    >> I've got an iMac. Here's my output of parted print:

    >
    > Have you tried virtualbox and Linux as ghost?
    > http://www.macwindows.com/virtualboxbeta.html


    I've used Virutalbox in the past on Ubuntu. It seems to work for a
    while, but then decides it doesn't like networking, or something.

  5. Re: EFI, sda1, and sda5

    Mark Carter wrote:
    > Mark Carter wrote:
    >
    >> The problem is, I've somewhat fried my EFI, so I can no longer boot to
    >> my iMac partition.

    >
    > The good news is that


    The trick is to retain a copy of menu.lst. If you've got that, then
    chances are that you can recover a partition without doing a reinstall.
    I've not fully wrapped my head around grub. Grub seems to have many
    problems with iMacs for a variety of reasons.

    My strategy now is to have 2 mini-partitions - one for rEFIt, which can
    boot OS X and the other mini-partition, and the other mini-partition in
    ext2 format which contains grub. I can then customise menu.lst to boot a
    Linux partition. If I install a new version of Linux, the plan is to
    install grub in the root partition, and then copy settings over to the
    ext2 parition. Hopefully this will keep things separate and minimise the
    ever-present danger of zapping something useful.

    Well, it's taken me quite some time to get this far - and the fat lady
    isn't singing yet. Praise the Lord for Ubuntu coming as a LiveCD and
    giving me the tools needed to fix whatever mess I create. My plan is to
    see if I can switch to Slackware full-time. It certainly seems a bit
    zippier than Ubuntu, and more stable.

    I dare say that this would have been a lot easier on a PC.

  6. Re: EFI, sda1, and sda5


    Mark Carter wrote :

    > Number Start End Size File system Name Flags
    > 1 20.5kB 210MB 210MB fat32 EFI System Partition boot
    > 2 210MB 63.1GB 62.9GB ext3 boot
    > 4 63.1GB 111GB 47.8GB ext3 boot
    > 3 111GB 114GB 3061MB linux-swap(new)
    > 5 114GB 250GB 136GB hfs+ Apple_HFS_Untitled_4


    How did you create the partitions on your harddisk? You can only have 4
    primary partitions and it looks like you've got 5. What's the output of:
    # fdisk -l
    --
    Thomas O.

    This area is designed to become quite warm during normal operation.

  7. Re: EFI, sda1, and sda5

    Thomas Overgaard wrote:

    > How did you create the partitions on your harddisk?


    gparted.

    > You can only have 4
    > primary partitions and it looks like you've got 5.



    Now I've got 6 iMacs use "GPT" partitions rather than primary and
    secondary partitions. It creates all sorts of wackiness.

    What's the output of:
    > # fdisk -l


    > Disk /dev/sda: 250.0 GB, 250059350016 bytes
    > 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 30401 cylinders
    > Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    >
    > Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    > /dev/sda1 1 26 204819+ ee EFI GPT
    > /dev/sda2 39 7674 61336170 83 Linux
    > /dev/sda3 13491 13863 2988899+ 82 Linux swap
    > /dev/sda4 * 7675 13491 46723571+ 83 Linux
    >
    > Partition table entries are not in disk order


  8. Re: EFI, sda1, and sda5


    Mark Carter wrote :

    > iMacs use "GPT" partitions rather than primary and secondary
    > partitions.


    A search at Google reveals that to use GPT partitions in Linux Slackware
    you'll have to compile your own kernel because the kernel from Slackware
    lacks support for this:

    --
    Thomas O.

    This area is designed to become quite warm during normal operation.

  9. which driver assigns "sda" names


    Monitoring current threads and talking kernels, maybe it
    is timely to ask which of all those kernel drivers is
    the one that will assign drives as sda1, sda2, etc?

    I have an older PII PC with IDE HDD. I recently added
    an ATAPI DVD. cdrecord is fussy about this, and on a
    new computer with SATA drives, cdrrecord worked well
    when DVD was assigned as sda device, rather than hda,
    but I don't know where to select this in make menuconfig.

    Is this still prefered way to use cdrecord, as of
    Slackware 12?

    Dominic


  10. Re: EFI, sda1, and sda5

    On Thu, 27 Mar 2008, Mark Carter wrote:
    >
    > > Disk /dev/sda: 250.0 GB, 250059350016 bytes
    > > 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 30401 cylinders
    > > Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    > >
    > > Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    > > /dev/sda1 1 26 204819+ ee EFI GPT
    > > /dev/sda2 39 7674 61336170 83 Linux
    > > /dev/sda3 13491 13863 2988899+ 82 Linux swap
    > > /dev/sda4 * 7675 13491 46723571+ 83 Linux
    > >
    > > Partition table entries are not in disk order



    Minor points...

    Interesting you have alittle gap between blocks 26 and 39.

    Not sure anyone needs/uses swap space anymore, although
    the Mac tends to have less memory than a PC. A quick
    inspection of your numbers I believe gives about 6.7
    Gigs of swap. Is there any point to this?

    Dominic


  11. Re: EFI, sda1, and sda5

    >> > /dev/sda3 13491 13863 2988899+ 82 Linux swap
    >> > /dev/sda4 * 7675 13491 46723571+ 83 Linux

    > Minor points...
    >
    > Interesting you have alittle gap between blocks 26 and 39.
    >
    > I believe gives about 6.7 Gigs of swap. Is there any point to this?


    I think he has 2988899 blocks which should be 1.5GB swap.

    But I wonder about the overlap in the last block of sda4 and the first of
    sda3. That might be dangerous.

    --
    damjan

  12. Re: EFI, sda1, and sda5

    Dominic-Luc Webb wrote:
    > On Thu, 27 Mar 2008, Mark Carter wrote:
    >>> Disk /dev/sda: 250.0 GB, 250059350016 bytes
    >>> 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 30401 cylinders
    >>> Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    >>>
    >>> Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    >>> /dev/sda1 1 26 204819+ ee EFI GPT
    >>> /dev/sda2 39 7674 61336170 83 Linux
    >>> /dev/sda3 13491 13863 2988899+ 82 Linux swap
    >>> /dev/sda4 * 7675 13491 46723571+ 83 Linux
    >>>
    >>> Partition table entries are not in disk order

    >
    >
    > Minor points...
    >
    > Interesting you have alittle gap between blocks 26 and 39.


    That's a very recent thing. I used gparted on ubuntu to resize the sda2
    partition, and create a partition right after sda1. The new partition is
    called sda5. That's where I have installed grub. Well actually, I seem
    to have installed grub all over the show - but my plan is to use sda5 as
    a "definitive" place to boot Linux from. sda1 is a real witches brew of
    EFI-n-stuff. I haven't been able to read it with Linux, even though the
    file system says "fat32".

    With sda5, I plan only to edit it manually. If I install a new version
    of Linux, then I'll get it to install on its root partition, so as to
    avoid mucking anything up. At 100MB, then sda5 partition might be
    considered a little large just for grub. But I figured that I'd give
    myself room to manoeuvre.

    So that gap is a feature, not a bug

    The reason it doesn't show up in the list is because the list is
    produced using fdisk. The hard disk is partitioned using GPT - but there
    is compatibility of sorts with the old-style partitioning system.

    It's all an ungodly mess, with new and old sytle partitioning systems,
    Apple not implementing the new style compliantly, grub not liking one
    thing or another, and so on.

    What I have learnt, though, is that provided I know what boot parameters
    to specify, and aren't a completely silly boy, there's a good chance
    that I'll be able to recover a partition's bootability. Apple's boot
    disk does allow you to reset the mess so that it boots OS X. From there
    I can reinstall rEFIt, and from Ubuntu running live I can reinstall
    Grub. So it all ought to be recoverable. Fingers crossed!

    >
    > Not sure anyone needs/uses swap space anymore, although
    > the Mac tends to have less memory than a PC. A quick
    > inspection of your numbers I believe gives about 6.7
    > Gigs of swap. Is there any point to this?


    I've got 3 G of swap. Maybe excessive, I'm not sure.

  13. Re: EFI, sda1, and sda5

    Damjan wrote:
    >>>> /dev/sda3 13491 13863 2988899+ 82 Linux swap
    >>>> /dev/sda4 * 7675 13491 46723571+ 83 Linux

    >> Minor points...
    >>
    >> Interesting you have alittle gap between blocks 26 and 39.
    >>
    >> I believe gives about 6.7 Gigs of swap. Is there any point to this?

    >
    > I think he has 2988899 blocks which should be 1.5GB swap.
    >
    > But I wonder about the overlap in the last block of sda4 and the first of
    > sda3. That might be dangerous.
    >


    Now that you say that, that might explain a few things!!!! ... like how
    booting from sda4 was always a bust. Given the whole compatibility
    nightmare, I figured it was just grub or grub2 being rubbish. Hmmm.
    Interesting. Maybe I'll do some experimentation!

    It's a bit puzzling how the software tools let me create the
    incompatibility, though.

    So far, I'm quite liking Slackware. I still haven't got it set up
    perfectly, though. Overall impression is that it's very stable and fast,
    if not to say requiring a fair bit of a headwind to get airborne.
    Looking to see if it will replace OS X and Ubuntu - I'm less than a week
    into Slackware - although I have tried my hand at it before - as early
    as 1996, even.

  14. Re: EFI, sda1, and sda5

    On Fri, 28 Mar 2008, Mark Carter wrote:

    > It's all an ungodly mess, with new and old sytle partitioning systems,
    > Apple not implementing the new style compliantly, grub not liking one
    > thing or another, and so on.
    > >
    > > Not sure anyone needs/uses swap space anymore, although
    > > the Mac tends to have less memory than a PC. A quick
    > > inspection of your numbers I believe gives about 6.7
    > > Gigs of swap. Is there any point to this?

    >
    > I've got 3 G of swap. Maybe excessive, I'm not sure.


    Close enough! I do not know exactly how this is calculated but
    knew my number should be close. I do not use swap anymore, at
    least, not on newer computers.

    Dominic


  15. Re: EFI, sda1, and sda5

    Thomas Overgaard wrote:
    > Mark Carter wrote :
    >
    >> iMacs use "GPT" partitions rather than primary and secondary
    >> partitions.

    >
    > A search at Google reveals that to use GPT partitions in Linux Slackware
    > you'll have to compile your own kernel because the kernel from Slackware
    > lacks support for this:
    >


    I worship at your feet! I tried my hand at recompiling the kernel by
    enabling EFI, and I no longer get a kernel panic over the VFS problem!

    Previously I was using the huge kernel because I just couldn't get
    Slackware to boot otherwise. The kernel I'm using is half that size -
    and I've no doubts that I can trim it down further from there by
    removing stuff that I'm fairly sure I don't need (like ReiserFS, and
    allsorts).

    Rock-n-roll.

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