$HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session - Slackware

This is a discussion on $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session - Slackware ; Hallo, Beej, Du meintest am 29.02.08: > Tom N wrote: >> I run as root. A lot of people do. Why shouldn't I? I AM root here. > This is generally a bad idea--just look at Windows. Unix, Linux, > ...

+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 41 to 60 of 66

Thread: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

  1. Re: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

    Hallo, Beej,

    Du meintest am 29.02.08:

    > Tom N wrote:
    >> I run as root. A lot of people do. Why shouldn't I? I AM root here.


    > This is generally a bad idea--just look at Windows. Unix, Linux,
    > BSD, and Mac OSX don't run you as root by default.


    Tom is a troll - why do you feed it?

    > Experienced Un*x users don't run as root unless they have to.


    Experienced users don't feed trolls.

    Viele Gruesse
    Helmut

    "Ubuntu" - an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".


  2. Re: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

    On 2008-02-29, Helmut Hullen wrote:
    > Hallo, Beej,
    >
    > Du meintest am 29.02.08:
    >
    >> Tom N wrote:
    >>> I run as root. A lot of people do. Why shouldn't I? I AM root here.

    >
    >> This is generally a bad idea--just look at Windows. Unix, Linux,
    >> BSD, and Mac OSX don't run you as root by default.

    >
    > Tom is a troll - why do you feed it?
    >
    >> Experienced Un*x users don't run as root unless they have to.

    >
    > Experienced users don't feed trolls.
    >


    Tom is not a troll, he is a seriously uninformed Linux user posting
    seriously flawed info and concepts. There is a difference.

    ken



  3. Re: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

    On Fri, 29 Feb 2008, Tom N wrote:

    >
    > On Feb 27, 11:59 am, Dave Uhring wrote:
    >> On Wed, 27 Feb 2008 10:52:26 -0800, PaulH wrote:
    >>> When my X session (XFCE) starts, and I open an xterm (with loginshell
    >>> enabled) my $HOME variable is empty.

    >>
    >>> All of the 'dot' configuration files appear in the root / directory. Any
    >>> config files in my normal home directory are ignored, I have to copy
    >>> them to the root.

    >>
    >> You are *not* supposed to be logging into an X session as root, period.
    >> Create a user account for yourself.
    >>
    >> useradd -c 'Your Name' -d /home/paulh -m -s /bin/bash paulh
    >> passwd paulh
    >>
    >> Log out as root and don't log in as root again. If you really need to do
    >> something as root then use "su".

    >
    > I run as root. A lot of people do. Why shouldn't I? I AM root here.
    >
    > And despite all the paranoid blather such as you have parroted
    > here, we never have any problems because of it.



    this, from a suppsoed n00bie hahahah Dan you're right this IS Alan Connor
    the ****headed netkook.

    > Tom Newton
    > calhobbit@gmail.com


    Sorry Alan, your sig was corrupted so I corrected it for you

    --
    Cheers
    Res

    mysql> update auth set Framed-IP-Address='127.0.0.127' where user= 'troll';

  4. Re: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

    In article <62qqirF22mbprU1@mid.individual.net>,
    Two Ravens wrote:

    > jellybean stonerfish wrote:
    >
    > > He probably does
    > >
    > > su ordinaryuser

    >
    > Only if he has an ordinary user, and he says he does:
    >
    > > I su to an ordinary user account when necessary.

    >
    > At what point is it *necessary* to be "an ordinary user", if his home is
    > at root? If his 'home' is at root why has he got "an ordinary user"?
    > What is the purpose of having an ordinary user", other than to obviate
    > the need for running as root?


    I believe there are (or were, it has been 10 years or more since I
    discovered them) a few well written applications out there that refuse
    to run as root. You actually get a popup that tells you what a dumbass
    you are for trying to run any application as root.

    Scott Cole

  5. Re: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

    ringwraith wrote:

    > I believe there are (or were, it has been 10 years or more since I
    > discovered them) a few well written applications out there that refuse
    > to run as root. You actually get a popup that tells you what a dumbass
    > you are for trying to run any application as root.


    Quite rightly so, K3B, whilst not actually refusing to run as root,
    gives you a warning if you start it as root. However given his
    antipathy to things KDE, I doubt if he'd give such a warning much
    credence. It does seem strange to be so set on running as root when
    best practice would seem to suggest to any reasonable individual that
    it is less than a good idea:

    > I run as root. A lot of people do. Why shouldn't I? I AM root here.


    > All of the setuid and sudo and su and other measures needed to run
    > apps as non root just add to the complexity of your system and
    > counter-balance the security advantages of running as non-root.


    There also seems to be an underlying fear of complex, or perhaps it
    might be better described as non-simple, processes.
    --
    Two Ravens
    "Tom Newton, surely the William Topaz McGonagall of
    alt.os.linux.slackware, and now, seemingly, comp.os.linux.setup and
    comp.os.linux.misc.as well!"

  6. Re: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

    On Fri, 29 Feb 2008 16:35:39 +0000, Two Ravens wrote:

    > jellybean stonerfish wrote:
    >
    >> He probably does
    >>
    >> su ordinaryuser

    >
    > Only if he has an ordinary user, and he says he does:
    >
    >> I su to an ordinary user account when necessary.

    >
    > At what point is it *necessary* to be "an ordinary user", if his home is
    > at root? If his 'home' is at root why has he got "an ordinary user"?
    > What is the purpose of having an ordinary user", other than to obviate
    > the need for running as root?
    >
    > Is this Tom demonstrating circular thinking? does he su back to root
    > having used su to become "an ordinary user"?
    >
    > I'd love to see his explanation for this rather convoluted use of root
    > and one or more 'ordinary users'.


    I sometimes su back to an ordinary user, for the simple pleasure of doing
    something as an ordinary user when I am already su'd to root. Then I can
    just do exit to get back to root. This way I don't have to switch
    terminals and enter my ordinary password. Oh god I think Tom is rubbing
    off on me.

    stonerfish
    --
    Help, I'm stuck in super-user mode.

  7. Re: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

    Two Ravens :
    > Two Ravens wrote:
    >
    >>> NAME
    >>> su - change user ID or become superuser
    >>>
    >>> SYNOPSIS
    >>> su [options] [LOGIN]
    >>>
    >>> So typing
    >>>
    >>> su sally
    >>>
    >>> will prompt me for sallys password or, if I am root, switch me to
    >>> sallys account without prompting (I think). This way one can work all
    >>> ass backwards and ocassionally limit oneself to a user account.

    >>
    >> Oh come on! You don't really expect us to believe that Tom N/Tom
    >> Newton knows how to do that do you?

    >
    > On the other hand he can probably claim that the procedure outlined
    > above was what he meant, as you've now explained it for him.


    And now you can clain I ruined your argument? Now now, dont go there...

    --
    Earth -- mother of the most beautiful women in the universe.
    -- Apollo, "Who Mourns for Adonais?" stardate 3468.1

    www.websterscafe.com

  8. Re: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

    On Fri, 29 Feb 2008 20:22:17 +0000, Two Ravens wrote:

    >> Hey, Alan.... how come you're posting from Google Gropes? *Did you get
    >> banned by another NSP/ISP ? *LOL


    > That's hardly fair on poor old Tom now is it Dan? You know, despite
    > having it explained to him, that he can't tell the difference between
    > us.


    I'm trying to drive him insane, so that.... err.... well, (more) insane,
    so that he'll be re-institutionalized and leave us alone around here.

    I think it's working.


    --
    "Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".


  9. Re: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

    On Fri, 29 Feb 2008 21:46:00 +0100, Helmut Hullen wrote:

    > Experienced users don't feed trolls.


    > "Ubuntu" - an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".


    Experienced users know how to properly configure their newsreader to
    delimit a signature block. Even those signatures which are blatantly
    copied from another user.

    > User-Agent: OpenXP/4.10.7367 (Win32) (i386)


    Oh, well isn't that interesting.


    --
    "Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".


  10. Re: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

    Dan C wrote:

    > I'm trying to drive him insane, so that.... *err.... well, (more)
    > insane, so that he'll be re-institutionalized and leave us alone
    > around here.
    >
    > I think it's working.


    His appearances do seem to be fewer and further apart don't they. we
    have to thankful for small mercies. Apparently he's off annoying
    another news groups now.
    --
    Two Ravens
    "Tom Newton, surely the William Topaz McGonagall of
    alt.os.linux.slackware, and now, seemingly, comp.os.linux.setup and
    comp.os.linux.misc.as well!"

  11. Re: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

    Handover Phist wrote:

    > And now you can clain I ruined your argument? Now now, dont go
    > there...


    I wasn't actually trying to go there. I apologise if I appeared to be
    doing so, its just that he's probably on another 'linux' newsgroup at
    this very moment showing others how to su backwards and forwards from
    and to root.
    --
    Two Ravens
    "Tom Newton, surely the William Topaz McGonagall of
    alt.os.linux.slackware, and now, seemingly, comp.os.linux.setup and
    comp.os.linux.misc.as well!"

  12. Re: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

    On Fri, 29 Feb 2008 19:27:18 -0500, ringwraith wrote:

    > In article <62qqirF22mbprU1@mid.individual.net>,
    > Two Ravens wrote:
    >
    >> jellybean stonerfish wrote:
    >>
    >> > He probably does
    >> >
    >> > su ordinaryuser

    >>
    >> Only if he has an ordinary user, and he says he does:
    >>
    >> > I su to an ordinary user account when necessary.

    >>
    >> At what point is it *necessary* to be "an ordinary user", if his home
    >> is at root? If his 'home' is at root why has he got "an ordinary user"?
    >> What is the purpose of having an ordinary user", other than to obviate
    >> the need for running as root?

    >
    > I believe there are (or were, it has been 10 years or more since I
    > discovered them) a few well written applications out there that refuse
    > to run as root. You actually get a popup that tells you what a dumbass
    > you are for trying to run any application as root.
    >
    > Scott Cole


    About 2 years ago I had to use, at work, tools from a
    3d party three-letters-top-quarter-soft-seller and when I've
    been bitten once in a nasty way for running one of the major
    functions as root while it was supposed to be ran as a specific
    user (I won't give the name that'd tell out which was the product)
    and funnily enough while a good half of the rest of the tools
    were requiring to be launched as root or they wouldn't be able to
    launch their dependencies, anyway we finally had our customer's got
    rid of the nasty product but meanwhile I quickly wrote a wrapper to
    use with their tools line: (lines over 72 ahead)
    ------------
    # cat ShootFoot

    #!/bin/bash
    ###
    ### This is a wrapper launcher for scripts and progs
    ### written by Stoopid and family
    ### Usage: ShootFoot scriptByStoopid [parms of said script]
    ###
    function Usage () {
    printf "\nUsage: ${0} script_to_launch_wrapped [parms of said script]\n\n"
    exit 0 ;
    }
    ###
    function HeyStoopid () {
    _proggy=$(which ${1})
    _puser=$(ls -l ${_proggy} | cut -d' ' -f3)
    printf "\n\n**************************************\n\n"
    printf "\nI have a funny bad feeling about launching ${_proggy} as superuser\n"
    printf "Please, don't be silly, think it over and use the protected owner/user\n"
    printf "I may suggest to begin with a : 'sudo su - ${_puser}'\n\n"
    printf "Don't take it bad, refrain ;-)\n\n"
    printf "\n\n**************************************\n\n"
    exit -1 ;
    }
    ###
    ###
    ###
    [ $# == 0 ] && Usage
    ###
    [ $UID == 0 ] && HeyStoopid ${1}
    ###
    $@
    ------------

    Of course it's not perfect as it was written for a specific ruin
    but it may help some to know that even seasoned keyboards may need
    a hand sometimes to avoid injuring their feet ;-)

  13. Re: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

    Dan C wrote:

    > Hey, Alan.... how come you're posting from Google Gropes?


    Tom Newton wrote:

    > Google is for the computer illiterate and the poor.


    > And how am I a hypocrite?


    The collected wit and wisdom of Tom Newton Volume II

    > Of course they will. And they'll have powerful sorcerers casting
    > spells on you from nearby dens, and alien allies in invisible
    > craft hovering silently overhead beaming mind-control rays into
    > your brains.


    > I avoid doctors like the plague


    > I run as root.... I AM root here.


    > I su to an ordinary user account when necessary.


    > I am talking about the original Luddites.


    > I know several professional novelists and the work involved is
    > significant.


    > I've been reading this newsgroup for quite a while. One of the first
    > things I learned was to ignore the posts of most of the regulars.


    > I'll read another one of your posts...



    --
    Two Ravens
    "Tom Newton, surely the William Topaz McGonagall of
    alt.os.linux.slackware, and now, seemingly, comp.os.linux.setup and
    comp.os.linux.misc.as well!"

  14. Re: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

    Two Ravens :
    > Handover Phist wrote:
    >
    >> And now you can clain I ruined your argument? Now now, dont go
    >> there...

    >
    > I wasn't actually trying to go there. I apologise if I appeared to be
    > doing so, its just that he's probably on another 'linux' newsgroup at
    > this very moment showing others how to su backwards and forwards from
    > and to root.


    Ah, like a kid with a new toy. Whatever floats his boat, I ignore people
    who do that. Besides, running as root all the time, the more time he
    spends playing at the keyboard the sooner the inevitable `rm -rf /` will
    happen.

    --
    California is overrated.

    www.websterscafe.com

  15. Re: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

    Handover Phist wrote:

    > Besides, running as root all the time, the more time he
    > spends playing at the keyboard the sooner the inevitable `rm -rf /`
    > will happen.


    Which is why I just couldn't understand the line:

    > I su to an ordinary user account when necessary.


    As far as I am concerned the procedure he describes is the wrong way
    round, one operates as a user and when, and only when, *necessary* one
    uses su to perform the necessary action, and then exits back to being
    an ordinary user. However if one has ones 'home' at root when is
    it 'necessary' to be an ordinary user?
    --
    Two Ravens
    "Tom Newton, surely the William Topaz McGonagall of
    alt.os.linux.slackware, and now, seemingly, comp.os.linux.setup and
    comp.os.linux.misc.as well!"

  16. Re: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

    Two Ravens wrote:

    > As far as I am concerned the procedure he describes is the wrong way
    > round, one operates as a user and when, and only when, *necessary* one
    > uses su to perform the necessary action, and then exits back to being
    > an ordinary user. However if one has ones 'home' at root when is
    > it 'necessary' to be an ordinary user?


    To test a new 2700 line ODE script? To be sure root privileges are not
    required to run it? ... Naaa ... That would be a needless
    complication. Giving in to mindless paranoia. Contrary to ODE principles.

    --
    Old Man

    Playing with the ODE will make you go blind.

  17. Re: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

    Two Ravens (two-ravens@operamail.org) writes:
    > Handover Phist wrote:
    >
    >> Besides, running as root all the time, the more time he
    >> spends playing at the keyboard the sooner the inevitable `rm -rf /`
    >> will happen.

    >
    > Which is why I just couldn't understand the line:
    >
    >> I su to an ordinary user account when necessary.

    >
    > As far as I am concerned the procedure he describes is the wrong way
    > round, one operates as a user and when, and only when, *necessary* one
    > uses su to perform the necessary action, and then exits back to being
    > an ordinary user. However if one has ones 'home' at root when is
    > it 'necessary' to be an ordinary user?


    Because they have different accounts for different personalities?

    And then it's too much trouble logging out of root and then logging in
    as the secondary personality, so he wants to su to it.

    This is beginning to sound like the old days, when newsreaders would
    sit on the ISP's server, so they'd configure it and one thing they'd
    do is not allow posting if your added text was less than the quoted
    text. It seemed common back then to see people add line feeds or gibberish
    to "get around this" rather than deal with the real issue, which was
    too much quoted material. A shift of viewpoint would mean snipping
    the quoting, rather than adding more text.

    "It's too much work to set things up to do things as a user", so
    they run as root and then have to deal with other issues as a result
    of that. I can even picture someone making aliasses for all the dangerous
    commands so they will run with switches to limit their damage.

    Michael


  18. Re: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

    On 2008-03-01, Old Man wrote:
    > Contrary to ODE principles.


    Isn't that an oxymoron???

    ken



  19. Re: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

    On Sat, 01 Mar 2008 19:36:06 +0000, Michael Black wrote:

    > I can even picture someone making aliasses for all the dangerous
    > commands so they will run with switches to limit their damage.


    Don't forget they have to be two-letter aliases to conform to ODE
    principles.

    --
    Chick Tower

    For e-mail: aols2 DOT sent DOT towerboy AT xoxy DOT net


  20. Re: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

    On Sat, 01 Mar 2008 23:31:29 -0600, Chick Tower wrote:

    >> I can even picture someone making aliasses for all the dangerous
    >> commands so they will run with switches to limit their damage.


    > Don't forget they have to be two-letter aliases to conform to ODE
    > principles.


    Isn't two letters for an alias quite wasteful of time and resources? Any
    true follower/believer in the ODE movement would do it with one letter.


    --
    "Tom N" ("Tom Newton") - the latest nymshift of "Alan Connor".
    Read more about the netkook Alan Connor here:
    http://www.pearlgates.net/nanae/kooks/ac/fga.shtml
    Email him: calhobbit@gmail.com or simpleman.s43@gmail.com

+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast