$HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session - Slackware

This is a discussion on $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session - Slackware ; Tom N wrote: > > I run as root. A lot of people do. Why shouldn't I? I AM root here. yeah, a lot of people do a lot of various mean or stupid things like shooting themselves in the ...

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Thread: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

  1. Re: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

    Tom N wrote:
    >
    > I run as root. A lot of people do. Why shouldn't I? I AM root here.


    yeah, a lot of people do a lot of various mean or stupid things like
    shooting themselves in the foot, why shouldn't them?

    > And despite all the paranoid blather such as you have parroted
    > here, we never have any problems because of it.


    then you were lucky. lots of very skilled people had, and found that always
    logging as root was *bad*.
    **** happens. there's no guarantee that something will go wrong, but does
    Murphy really need help?

    > All of the setuid and sudo and su and other measures needed to run
    > apps as non root just add to the complexity of your system and
    > counter-balance the security advantages of running as non-root.


    yeah, try to do a simple rm -rf as root and then tell me what happens.
    everyone makes mistakes. just don't give them a chance more.
    not working as root is just a "best practice" that helps sometimes to
    prevent bad things from happening...

    > I have no problem running X as root, so I don't know how to address
    > his problem. Never encountered it. My $HOME is /root.


    and thank you for helping, too....

    > I su to an ordinary user account when necessary.


    I guess as much as one needs to su as root....

    > KISS and ignore the numerous paranoids in the computer
    > world, for the most part.


    but please listen to someone who is paranoid about a supposed korporate
    environment...

    ilSimo
    --
    now playing: Exodus - The Toxic Waltz

    I've travelled roads that lead to wonder
    I've seen cities rise and fall
    The burden, the cross of a pilgrim
    I bear no more, the son is coming home

    Candlemass - Where The Runes Still Speak


  2. Re: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

    On Fri, 29 Feb 2008 03:56:03 -0800, Tom N wrote:

    > I run as root. A lot of people do. Why shouldn't I? I AM root here.
    >
    > And despite all the paranoid blather such as you have parroted here, we
    > never have any problems because of it.


    Because a simple typo, say trying to remove a music folder in
    /data/music/rush could hose you system.....

    rm -rf / data/music/rush/power_windows

    If you only are root when you need to be, your common everyday typo's will
    not be as critical. When you do the above type of typo, as I have done,
    you will quickly learn to only use root when you need to.


    > I su to an ordinary user account when necessary.


    Ok, now my curiosity is peeked. If your $HOME is /root and you do your
    work as root, what would necessitate loggin on as an ordinary user?

    > Tom Newton


    stonerfish

  3. Re: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

    On Fri, 29 Feb 2008 14:08:50 +0000, Two Ravens wrote:

    > Tom N wrote:
    >
    >> I su to an ordinary user account when necessary.

    >
    > How do you manage that? If root invokes the command su and then presses
    > the carriage return key the result is that one is returned to the
    > command line prompt for root, vide:
    > root@xxxxx:~# su


    He probably does

    su ordinaryuser


    stonerfish

  4. Re: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

    jellybean stonerfish wrote:

    > He probably does
    >
    > su ordinaryuser


    I think its more likely that he doesn't know how to 'adduser'!

    --
    Two Ravens
    "Tom Newton, surely the William Topaz McGonagall of
    alt.os.linux.slackware, and now, seemingly, comp.os.linux.setup and
    comp.os.linux.misc.as well!"

  5. Re: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

    Tom N :
    > On Feb 27, 11:59 am, Dave Uhring wrote:
    >> On Wed, 27 Feb 2008 10:52:26 -0800, PaulH wrote:
    >> > When my X session (XFCE) starts, and I open an xterm (with loginshell
    >> > enabled) my $HOME variable is empty.

    >>
    >> > All of the 'dot' configuration files appear in the root / directory. Any
    >> > config files in my normal home directory are ignored, I have to copy
    >> > them to the root.

    >>
    >> You are *not* supposed to be logging into an X session as root, period.
    >> Create a user account for yourself.
    >>
    >> useradd -c 'Your Name' -d /home/paulh -m -s /bin/bash paulh
    >> passwd paulh
    >>
    >> Log out as root and don't log in as root again. If you really need to do
    >> something as root then use "su".

    >
    > I run as root. A lot of people do. Why shouldn't I? I AM root here.


    Because there's no safety on the trigger of the gun pointed at your
    foot.

    > And despite all the paranoid blather such as you have parroted
    > here, we never have any problems because of it.


    In my experience, it's a matter of time.

    > All of the setuid and sudo and su and other measures needed to run
    > apps as non root just add to the complexity of your system and
    > counter-balance the security advantages of running as non-root.


    I use sudo rarely, as there are very few 'apps' that need to be run as
    root. Nobody needs to run OpenOffice, Gimp, or Firefox as root. Running
    any network connected applications as root results in the mess we see
    with Windows today.

    > I have no problem running X as root, so I don't know how to address
    > his problem. Never encountered it. My $HOME is /root.
    >
    > I su to an ordinary user account when necessary.
    >
    > KISS and ignore the numerous paranoids in the computer
    > world, for the most part.


    But dont whine when you hose your box. You'll get no sympathy from
    anyone.

    > Tom Newton
    >
    > calhobbit
    > AT gmail
    > dot com



    --
    It's NO USE ... I've gone to "CLUB MED"!!

    www.websterscafe.com

  6. Re: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

    Two Ravens :
    > Tom N wrote:
    >
    >> I su to an ordinary user account when necessary.

    >
    > How do you manage that? If root invokes the command su and then presses
    > the carriage return key the result is that one is returned to the
    > command line prompt for root, vide:
    > root@xxxxx:~# su


    NAME
    su - change user ID or become superuser

    SYNOPSIS
    su [options] [LOGIN]

    So typing

    su sally

    will prompt me for sallys password or, if I am root, switch me to sallys
    account without prompting (I think). This way one can work all ass
    backwards and ocassionally limit oneself to a user account.

    --
    "I'm willing to sacrifice anything for this cause, even other people's
    lives"

    www.websterscafe.com

  7. Re: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

    On 2008-02-29, Two Ravens wrote:
    > jellybean stonerfish wrote:
    >
    >> He probably does
    >>
    >> su ordinaryuser

    >
    > I think its more likely that he doesn't know how to 'adduser'!
    >


    That's because he hasn't had the time, as yet, to write a 70 line bash
    script to invoke adduser for his ODE. That's a planned feature for version
    2, code name - dead end

    ken

  8. Re: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

    Tom N wrote:

    > I run as root. A lot of people do. Why shouldn't I? I AM root here.


    Please make this your signature line. It would save a lot of work for
    others.

    > And despite all the paranoid blather such as you have parroted
    > here, we never have any problems because of it.


    "We?" You and ...?

    > I have no problem running X as root, so I don't know how to address
    > his problem. Never encountered it. My $HOME is /root.


    Helpful, as always. Stupid, as always.

    --
    Old Man

    Playing with the ODE will make you go blind.

  9. Re: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

    Handover Phist wrote:

    > NAME
    > su - change user ID or become superuser
    >
    > SYNOPSIS
    > su [options] [LOGIN]
    >
    > So typing
    >
    > su sally
    >
    > will prompt me for sallys password or, if I am root, switch me to
    > sallys account without prompting (I think). This way one can work all
    > ass backwards and ocassionally limit oneself to a user account.


    Oh come on! You don't really expect us to believe that Tom N/Tom Newton
    knows how to do that do you?

    --
    Two Ravens
    "Tom Newton, surely the William Topaz McGonagall of
    alt.os.linux.slackware, and now, seemingly, comp.os.linux.setup and
    comp.os.linux.misc.as well!"

  10. Re: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

    On 02/29/08 16:07, jellybean stonerfish wrote:

    >>> I su to an ordinary user account when necessary.

    >> How do you manage that? If root invokes the command su and then presses
    >> the carriage return key the result is that one is returned to the
    >> command line prompt for root, vide:
    >> root@xxxxx:~# su

    >
    > He probably does
    >
    > su ordinaryuser
    >


    And this is why the OP doesn't get the correct setting for the $HOME
    variable.

    su - ordinaryuser

    Ciao
    Giovanni
    --
    A computer is like an air conditioner,
    it stops working when you open Windows.
    Registered Linux user #337974 < http://giovanni.homelinux.net/ >

  11. Re: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

    Two Ravens wrote:

    >> NAME
    >> su - change user ID or become superuser
    >>
    >> SYNOPSIS
    >> su [options] [LOGIN]
    >>
    >> So typing
    >>
    >> su sally
    >>
    >> will prompt me for sallys password or, if I am root, switch me to
    >> sallys account without prompting (I think). This way one can work all
    >> ass backwards and ocassionally limit oneself to a user account.

    >
    > Oh come on! You don't really expect us to believe that Tom N/Tom
    > Newton knows how to do that do you?


    On the other hand he can probably claim that the procedure outlined
    above was what he meant, as you've now explained it for him.
    --
    Two Ravens
    "Tom Newton, surely the William Topaz McGonagall of
    alt.os.linux.slackware, and now, seemingly, comp.os.linux.setup and
    comp.os.linux.misc.as well!"

  12. Re: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

    Hallo, Handover,

    Du meintest am 29.02.08:

    > So typing


    > su sally


    > will prompt me for sallys password or, if I am root, switch me to
    > sallys account without prompting (I think).


    Better:

    su - sally

    Then you get sallys environment too.

    Viele Gruesse
    Helmut

    "Ubuntu" - an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".


  13. Re: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

    jellybean stonerfish wrote:

    > He probably does
    >
    > su ordinaryuser


    Only if he has an ordinary user, and he says he does:

    > I su to an ordinary user account when necessary.


    At what point is it *necessary* to be "an ordinary user", if his home is
    at root? If his 'home' is at root why has he got "an ordinary user"?
    What is the purpose of having an ordinary user", other than to obviate
    the need for running as root?

    Is this Tom demonstrating circular thinking? does he su back to root
    having used su to become "an ordinary user"?

    I'd love to see his explanation for this rather convoluted use of root
    and one or more 'ordinary users'.
    --
    Two Ravens
    "Tom Newton, surely the William Topaz McGonagall of
    alt.os.linux.slackware, and now, seemingly, comp.os.linux.setup
    and comp.os.linux.misc. as well!"

  14. Re: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

    On Feb 29, 6:08 am, Two Ravens wrote:
    > Tom N wrote:
    > > I su to an ordinary user account when necessary.

    >
    > How do you manage that? If root invokes the command su and then presses
    > the carriage return key the result is that one is returned to the
    > command line prompt for root, vide:
    > root@xxxxx:~# su
    > one then presses the carrage return or 'enter key and is then presented
    > with, the command line prompt for 'root',exit
    > root@xxxxx:~#
    >
    > Do you actually know what you're doing? Do you actually know what you're
    > talking/writing about?
    >
    > --
    > Two Ravens
    > "...hit the squirrel..."


    I read this in the hopes that you had finally grown up.

    I'll read another one of your posts, arbitrarily picking one of
    the aliases you hide behind to sh_t on the Internet, in another
    few months.

    But I do have one pressing question, one that I'm sure everyone else
    wonders about:

    Who operates your computer for you?

    Is it your mother?

    Tom Newton

  15. beware of the full moon (was: $HOME variable gets lost whenstarting an X session)

    On Fri, 29 Feb 2008 16:35:39 +0000, Two Ravens wrote:

    > Is this Tom demonstrating circular thinking?


    This is no fresh news!

    > does he su back to root
    > having used su to become "an ordinary user"?


    probably for reasons of security thru obscurity )

    > I'd love to see his explanation for this rather convoluted use of root
    > and one or more 'ordinary users'.
    > --
    > Two Ravens
    > "Tom Newton, surely the William Topaz McGonagall

    ....

    beware, you're starting to use it as a sigfile, he'll soon
    be on FoXnooz then Oprahz and he'll be the next prez!
    Do beware #>

  16. Re: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

    On 2008-02-29, Tom N wrote:
    >
    > I run as root. A lot of people do. Why shouldn't I? I AM root here.


    Please note to newbies: Do not take ''Tom's'' advice. Do *not* run as
    root. If you're like me, and not ''Tom'', then you're not perfect, will
    make a mistake, and if you do it as root you're b0rked.

    > I su to an ordinary user account when necessary.


    That's completely idiotic. How could it possibly be necessary?

    > KISS and ignore the numerous paranoids in the computer
    > world, for the most part.


    KISS practically demands that you do everything as a regular user except
    that which requires root privileges.

    --keith

    --
    kkeller-usenet@wombat.san-francisco.ca.us
    (try just my userid to email me)
    AOLSFAQ=http://www.therockgarden.ca/aolsfaq.txt
    see X- headers for PGP signature information


  17. Re: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

    Tom N, calhobbit@gmail.com wrote:

    > I'll read another one of your posts, *arbitrarily picking one of
    > the aliases you hide behind to sh_t on the Internet, in another
    > few months.


    Perhaps you'd care to inform us all of any of the other "aliases"
    I "hide behind to sh_t on the Internet".

    > Who operates your computer for you?
    >
    > Is it your mother?


    My mother died thirty years ago, I'm afraid I'm that I stuck being one
    of those couch potato KDE users you spend so much energy railing
    against.

    loki harfagr wrote:

    > beware, you're starting to use it as a sigfile, he'll soon
    > be on FoXnooz then Oprahz and he'll be the next prez!


    See new sig below!
    --
    Two Ravens
    "Tom Newton, surely the William Topaz McGonagall of
    alt.os.linux.slackware, and now, seemingly, comp.os.linux.setup and
    comp.os.linux.misc.as well!"

  18. Re: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

    Tom N wrote:
    >I run as root. A lot of people do. Why shouldn't I? I AM root here.


    This is generally a bad idea--just look at Windows. Unix, Linux, BSD,
    and Mac OSX don't run you as root by default.

    Remember, when you run a program as root, you are giving that program
    root privileges. This means you trust it completely with your system.
    You trust it to not install backdoors, to not transfer private files, to
    not add your machine to a spam botnet.

    Experienced Un*x users don't run as root unless they have to.

    -Beej


  19. Re: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

    On Fri, 29 Feb 2008 09:45:29 -0800, Tom N wrote:

    > I read this in the hopes that you had finally grown up.


    You read every post here, from every poster, doofus.

    Hey, Alan.... how come you're posting from Google Gropes? Did you get
    banned by another NSP/ISP ? LOL

    Alan Connor (Tom Newton)'s brain after using ODE too long:

    http://brandybuck.890m.com/pics/homer.jpg


    --
    "Tom N" ("Tom Newton") - the latest nymshift of "Alan Connor".
    Read more about the netkook Alan Connor here:
    http://www.pearlgates.net/nanae/kooks/ac/fga.shtml
    Email him: calhobbit@gmail.com or simpleman.s43@gmail.com

  20. Re: $HOME variable gets lost when starting an X session

    Dan C wrote:

    > Hey, Alan.... how come you're posting from Google Gropes? *Did you get
    > banned by another NSP/ISP ? *LOL


    That's hardly fair on poor old Tom now is it Dan? You know, despite
    having it explained to him, that he can't tell the difference between
    us.

    --
    Two Ravens
    "Tom Newton, surely the William Topaz McGonagall of
    alt.os.linux.slackware, and now, seemingly, comp.os.linux.setup and
    comp.os.linux.misc.as well!"

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