netconfig puzzle - Slackware

This is a discussion on netconfig puzzle - Slackware ; I have a new Slackware 9.1 installation (too many problems installing 12.0 on my old Dell Dimension 4100, but let's not get into that!). When I configure the network with netconfig, the second step is to give a domaine name ...

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Thread: netconfig puzzle

  1. netconfig puzzle

    I have a new Slackware 9.1 installation (too many problems installing
    12.0 on my old Dell Dimension 4100, but let's not get into that!).

    When I configure the network with netconfig, the second step is to
    give a domaine name for the machine (of the form "example.org"). Do
    you have to supply a REGISTERED domain name here? I have a registered
    domaine name (manhattanhandyman.com) but it currently maps to an IP
    address at my web host in California. Therefore, it assume I cannot
    use it.

    My IP address is assigned by ISP, using DHCP. How is this IP address
    mapped to the domain name that I assign to my machine? How do I make
    sure that the domaine name I supply is unique on the Internet (and
    does not collide with someone else's)?

    I'm confused...

    Best Regards,
    Vwaju
    New York City

  2. Re: netconfig puzzle

    On 2008-02-02, Vwaju wrote:
    > I have a new Slackware 9.1 installation (too many problems installing
    > 12.0 on my old Dell Dimension 4100, but let's not get into that!).
    >
    > When I configure the network with netconfig, the second step is to
    > give a domaine name for the machine (of the form "example.org"). Do
    > you have to supply a REGISTERED domain name here? I have a registered
    > domaine name (manhattanhandyman.com) but it currently maps to an IP
    > address at my web host in California. Therefore, it assume I cannot
    > use it.
    >
    > My IP address is assigned by ISP, using DHCP. How is this IP address
    > mapped to the domain name that I assign to my machine? How do I make
    > sure that the domaine name I supply is unique on the Internet (and
    > does not collide with someone else's)?
    >
    > I'm confused...


    Just make one up.

    Or let example.org stand.

    Tom


  3. Re: netconfig puzzle

    On Fri, 1 Feb 2008 17:51:02 -0800 (PST), Vwaju wrote:

    >I have a new Slackware 9.1 installation (too many problems installing
    >12.0 on my old Dell Dimension 4100, but let's not get into that!).
    >
    >When I configure the network with netconfig, the second step is to
    >give a domaine name for the machine (of the form "example.org"). Do
    >you have to supply a REGISTERED domain name here?


    You can use 'localnet'.

    > I have a registered
    >domaine name (manhattanhandyman.com) but it currently maps to an IP
    >address at my web host in California. Therefore, it assume I cannot
    >use it.
    >
    >My IP address is assigned by ISP, using DHCP. How is this IP address
    >mapped to the domain name that I assign to my machine?


    It's not mapped to the local name, just to the network interface, the
    domain names are not required for connection to the Internet, just the
    IP address. Mapping to a domain name is only a convenience.

    > How do I make
    >sure that the domaine name I supply is unique on the Internet (and
    >does not collide with someone else's)?


    You don't, the domain name you choose for the local machine is not seen
    on the Internet, therefore there is no clash of names.
    >
    >I'm confused...


    Just give it a go.

    Grant.
    --
    http://bugsplatter.mine.nu/

  4. Re: netconfig puzzle

    On Sat, 2 Feb 2008, Tom Newton wrote:
    > On 2008-02-02, Vwaju wrote:
    >> I have a new Slackware 9.1 installation (too many problems installing
    >> 12.0 on my old Dell Dimension 4100, but let's not get into that!).
    >> When I configure the network with netconfig, the second step is to
    >> give a domaine name for the machine (of the form "example.org"). Do
    >> you have to supply a REGISTERED domain name here?


    That really depends on what you want to be able to do.
    You can get away with a bogus name for some purposes.
    But if you want to run your own SMTP server (instead of
    using your ISP's SMTP server, as per your earlier post),
    then you really should have a properly registered domain
    name mapped to your ISP-assigned ip#.


    >> I have a registered
    >> domaine name (manhattanhandyman.com) but it currently maps to an IP
    >> address at my web host in California. Therefore, it assume I cannot
    >> use it.


    Right. But note, depending on your registrar, you might be able
    to create a 'third-level' name (ex: foo.manhattanhandyman.com).
    Some registrars (ex: joker.com) allow you to do this at no extra
    charge. Some registrars may not be so reasonable.


    >> My IP address is assigned by ISP, using DHCP.


    That's too bad. Ask your ISP
    (a) how much for static ip# ?
    (b) how much for reverse DNS service for that static ip# ?
    If the answers are unsatisfactory, investigate switching ISP.


    >> How is this IP address
    >> mapped to the domain name that I assign to my machine?


    That's called 'reverse DNS', a DNS 'PTR record' and that is
    controlled by your ISP, who owns the ip# netblock. Some ISPs will
    provide (at no add'l cost) reverse DNS to map their ip# to your
    domain name, just as your registrar maps your domain name to your
    ISP-assigned ip#. This is easy if you have a static ip# but not
    so easy if you have a dynamic ip# supplied by DHCP (since the ip#
    may change from time to time, at the whim of the ISP ...)


    >> How do I make
    >> sure that the domaine name I supply is unique on the Internet (and
    >> does not collide with someone else's)?


    If you -don't- want to run your own SMTP (or HTTP, rsync, ssh, etc)
    then you might use a made-up domain in the '.lan' tld, (ex: foo.lan).
    Since .lan is a bogus TLD, it is guaranteed to not be in use on
    the net. But if you want your machine to be able to be found by
    it's domain name, (which is what domain names are for), then you
    need a real domain name.



    >>
    >> I'm confused...


    it can be confusing at first :*)

    google a bit for 'free dns' and you'll probably learn something.

    HTH.



    On Sat, 2 Feb 2008, Tom Newton wrote:
    >
    > Just make one up.
    >
    > Or let example.org stand.
    > Tom


    NO NO NO !!!
    --> !! BAD ADVICE !! <--

    example.org is a legitimate registered and active domain.

    ((sheesh!)

    --
    William Hunt, Portland Oregon USA

  5. Re: netconfig puzzle

    On Sat, 2 Feb 2008 01:53:45 +0000 (UTC), Tom Newton wrote:

    >Just make one up.
    >
    >Or let example.org stand.


    ~$ host example.org
    example.org has address 208.77.188.166

    Yeah, right...

    Grant.
    --
    http://bugsplatter.mine.nu/

  6. Re: netconfig puzzle

    On 2008-02-02, Grant wrote:
    > On Sat, 2 Feb 2008 01:53:45 +0000 (UTC), Tom Newton wrote:
    >
    >>Just make one up.
    >>
    >>Or let example.org stand.

    >
    > ~$ host example.org
    > example.org has address 208.77.188.166
    >
    > Yeah, right...
    >
    > Grant.


    As I recall, iana owns the domain so that and example.com and example.net
    can be used in documentation and the like.

    ken

  7. Re: netconfig puzzle

    On 2008-02-02, Grant wrote:
    > On Sat, 2 Feb 2008 01:53:45 +0000 (UTC), Tom Newton wrote:
    >
    >>Just make one up.
    >>
    >>Or let example.org stand.

    >
    > ~$ host example.org
    > example.org has address 208.77.188.166
    >
    > Yeah, right...
    >
    > Grant.


    Mine is google.com and it has never caused any kind of
    a problem.

    I am speaking from experience.

    You ought to try it sometime.

    Tom


  8. Re: netconfig puzzle

    On Fri, 01 Feb 2008 22:18:29 -0600, No_One wrote:

    >On 2008-02-02, Grant wrote:
    >> On Sat, 2 Feb 2008 01:53:45 +0000 (UTC), Tom Newton wrote:
    >>
    >>>Just make one up.
    >>>
    >>>Or let example.org stand.

    >>
    >> ~$ host example.org
    >> example.org has address 208.77.188.166
    >>
    >> Yeah, right...
    >>
    >> Grant.

    >
    >As I recall, iana owns the domain so that and example.com and example.net
    >can be used in documentation and the like.


    Yeah, ICANN, close enough

    Grant.
    --
    http://bugsplatter.mine.nu/

  9. Re: netconfig puzzle

    On 2008-02-02, Grant wrote:
    >>As I recall, iana owns the domain so that and example.com and example.net
    >>can be used in documentation and the like.

    >
    > Yeah, ICANN, close enough
    >
    > Grant.


    It's Friday night. Close enough is good enough for me.

    ken

  10. Re: netconfig puzzle

    On 2008-02-02, Tom Newton wrote:
    > On 2008-02-02, Grant wrote:
    >> On Sat, 2 Feb 2008 01:53:45 +0000 (UTC), Tom Newton wrote:
    >>
    >>>Just make one up.
    >>>
    >>>Or let example.org stand.

    >>
    >> ~$ host example.org
    >> example.org has address 208.77.188.166
    >>
    >> Yeah, right...
    >>
    >> Grant.

    >
    > Mine is google.com and it has never caused any kind of
    > a problem.
    >
    > I am speaking from experience.
    >
    > You ought to try it sometime.
    >


    P.S.

    The thing is, that no one (with any sense) and no software
    (written by someone who knows what they are doing), 'thinks' that
    that's your actual domain name.

    They already know what your domain really is: It's the one your
    IP, given you by your ISP, translates to. Or the domain registered
    to you or your business or org that your IP translates to.

    It's the one in your IP packet headers.

    Tom


  11. Re: netconfig puzzle

    On Sat, 2 Feb 2008, Tom Newton wrote:
    > On 2008-02-02, Grant wrote:
    >> On Sat, 2 Feb 2008 01:53:45 +0000 (UTC), Tom Newton wrote:
    >>> Just make one up.
    >>> Or let example.org stand.

    >>
    >> ~$ host example.org
    >> example.org has address 208.77.188.166
    >> Yeah, right...
    >> Grant.

    >
    > Mine is google.com and it has never caused any kind of
    > a problem.
    > I am speaking from experience.
    > You ought to try it sometime.
    > Tom



    You are not running an SMTP server, as per the OP's original
    questions. If you want to run an SMTP server, you'll
    need a legitmate domain name (A, MX, and PTR records).
    And that pretty much requires a static ip#.
    Having a dynamic DHCP ip# pretty much rules out running services.
    If you will be using your ISP for SMTP and POP/IMAP, then no,
    the domain name doesn't really matter. Your ISP will recognize
    you by the ip# they have assigned you.

    As i said in previous post, it all depends on what you want to do.
    One size does NOT fit all.

    --
    William Hunt, Portland Oregon USA

  12. Re: netconfig puzzle

    On Fri, 1 Feb 2008 21:39:42 -0800,
    William Hunt wrote:
    > On Sat, 2 Feb 2008, Tom Newton wrote:
    >> On 2008-02-02, Grant wrote:
    >>> On Sat, 2 Feb 2008 01:53:45 +0000 (UTC), Tom Newton wrote:
    >>>> Just make one up.
    >>>> Or let example.org stand.
    >>>
    >>> ~$ host example.org
    >>> example.org has address 208.77.188.166
    >>> Yeah, right...
    >>> Grant.

    >>
    >> Mine is google.com and it has never caused any kind of
    >> a problem.
    >> I am speaking from experience.
    >> You ought to try it sometime.

    >
    > You are not running an SMTP server, as per the OP's original
    > questions. If you want to run an SMTP server, you'll
    > need a legitmate domain name (A, MX, and PTR records).
    > And that pretty much requires a static ip#.


    Not entirely. It's pretty straightforward to run an smtp server
    on a dynamic IP using a service like DynDNS and the Smarthost
    function of sendmail to relay outbound mail through your ISP.


    > Having a dynamic DHCP ip# pretty much rules out running
    > services.


    Well, no. DynDNS (and others) allow this pretty handily.

    --
    Theodore (Ted) Heise Bloomington, IN, USA

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