Preferred DVD media. - Slackware

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Thread: Preferred DVD media.

  1. Preferred DVD media.

    My new CD/DVD rw drive will handle several kinds of DVD media but I
    have thus far only used it with CDs. I use cdrecord for writing CDs
    and would do the same for DVDs. For such things as recording the
    latest Slackware release, is there one form of DVD media that is
    preferred over another? I am planning to continue to use cdrecord. I
    don't plan on using rewritable media but just writable.

    John Culleton.

  2. Re: Preferred DVD media.

    On Mon, 21 Jan 2008 08:57:35 -0800, john@wexfordpress.com wrote:

    > My new CD/DVD rw drive will handle several kinds of DVD media but I have
    > thus far only used it with CDs. I use cdrecord for writing CDs and
    > would do the same for DVDs. For such things as recording the latest
    > Slackware release, is there one form of DVD media that is preferred over
    > another? I am planning to continue to use cdrecord. I don't plan on
    > using rewritable media but just writable.
    >
    > John Culleton.


    FWIW - I have a stack of cheap DVD-R that have worked well.

  3. Re: Preferred DVD media.

    On Mon, 21 Jan 2008 16:59:31 +0000, ray wrote:

    > On Mon, 21 Jan 2008 08:57:35 -0800, john@wexfordpress.com wrote:
    >
    >> My new CD/DVD rw drive will handle several kinds of DVD media but I
    >> have thus far only used it with CDs. I use cdrecord for writing CDs
    >> and would do the same for DVDs. For such things as recording the
    >> latest Slackware release, is there one form of DVD media that is
    >> preferred over another? I am planning to continue to use cdrecord. I
    >> don't plan on using rewritable media but just writable.
    >>
    >> John Culleton.

    >
    > FWIW - I have a stack of cheap DVD-R that have worked well.


    From my experiences I would have to conclude that there is very little
    correlation between price and results when it comes to writable optical
    media.

    But since, by mentioning cdrecord, you have already summoned the spirit
    of Joerg Schilling, he will be along any moment now. He can advise you
    better than most people which media work well with cdrecord. And he
    probably will, once he's finished trashing wodim and genisofs and the
    debian project ;-)

  4. Re: Preferred DVD media.

    On Mon, 21 Jan 2008 08:57:35 -0800, john@wexfordpress.com wrote:

    > My new CD/DVD rw drive will handle several kinds of DVD media but I
    > have thus far only used it with CDs. I use cdrecord for writing CDs
    > and would do the same for DVDs. For such things as recording the
    > latest Slackware release, is there one form of DVD media that is
    > preferred over another? I am planning to continue to use cdrecord. I
    > don't plan on using rewritable media but just writable.
    >
    > John Culleton.
    >

    As far as brands, I have used HP and Sony DVD-R single layer media
    successfully. There are also dual layer DVD's, but I haven't tried them
    because the media is more expensive and the process sounds less reliable
    for archive purposes. Maybe I'll change my mind when the "100 layer" DVD's
    come out and give 100G to 1TB per disc. That would be another
    "compelling" upgrade, and according to a Slashdot story, is under
    development. I also read on Slashdot that DVD+R is somehow superior to
    DVD-R, but I haven't used them either. Personally, the one fact that I do
    believe is relevent is that DVD are more durable than CD-R in the long run
    because the DVD media is a made similar to a "sandwich." The writeable
    film is glued between two plastic layers and that offers better
    protection. With CD-R, the film is applied directly to the surface and is
    subject to being scratched off. That could be a major reason to switch to
    DVD, assuming the media cost is about the same (say, 10 to 25 cents.)

    OT (?): Another factor to consider when making DVDs for archive/backup
    purposes, is that multi-session is best avoided (IMO). I have accepted
    that using DVD requires accepting the data in 4G blocks. That is also
    fine because a local mandate requires that backup/archives be made using
    encryption. I handle this requirement by creating a "loopback"
    container of the appropriate size, and splitting into blocks, which
    are written to DVD. I think that the max file size for any file on a
    DVD is possibly 2^32 - 1. This command generates a container which will be
    acceptable, if the disc is made with udf structures.

    dd if=/dev/zero of=container bs=1024 count=0 seek=4000000

    More discussion of encrypted containers is too far off topic, so I'll stop
    here.

    As far as tools, k3b is a simple method for creating DVDs. But
    lately, I have been using growisofs directly (steps documented below.)

    FWIW, here are the steps I perform to create a DVD using command-line
    tools:

    1. Create a top-level directory entry where the DVD's file/directory
    structure will be assembled.
    2. Move (or hard-link) files into the directory structure for the DVD.
    3. Create and iso using mkisofs

    mkisofs -J -R -udf -o output.iso input_dir

    4. Write iso to DVD using growisofs

    growisofs -dvd-compat -speed=4 -Z /dev/hdc=output.iso

    Pick a speed appropriate to your computer's throughput, and consider other
    tasks which may be running, etc.

    5. Eject DVD (reset drive)
    6. Verify DVD matches image (use md5sum)

    losetup /dev/loop0 output.iso
    md5sum output.iso
    dd if=/dev/hdc bs=512 count=$(blockdev --getsize /dev/loop0) | md5sum -

    7. Clean up. Delete iso and working directories, etc.

    --
    Douglas Mayne

  5. Re: Preferred DVD media.

    On Jan 21, 1:15 pm, Douglas Mayne wrote:
    > On Mon, 21 Jan 2008 08:57:35 -0800, j...@wexfordpress.com wrote:
    > > My new CD/DVD rw drive will handle several kinds of DVD media but I
    > > have thus far only used it with CDs. I use cdrecord for writing CDs
    > > and would do the same for DVDs. For such things as recording the
    > > latest Slackware release, is there one form of DVD media that is
    > > preferred over another? I am planning to continue to use cdrecord. I
    > > don't plan on using rewritable media but just writable.

    >
    > > John Culleton.

    >
    > As far as brands, I have used HP and Sony DVD-R single layer media
    > successfully. There are also dual layer DVD's, but I haven't tried them
    > because the media is more expensive and the process sounds less reliable
    > for archive purposes. Maybe I'll change my mind when the "100 layer" DVD's
    > come out and give 100G to 1TB per disc. That would be another
    > "compelling" upgrade, and according to a Slashdot story, is under
    > development. I also read on Slashdot that DVD+R is somehow superior to
    > DVD-R, but I haven't used them either. Personally, the one fact that I do
    > believe is relevent is that DVD are more durable than CD-R in the long run
    > because the DVD media is a made similar to a "sandwich." The writeable
    > film is glued between two plastic layers and that offers better
    > protection. With CD-R, the film is applied directly to the surface and is
    > subject to being scratched off. That could be a major reason to switch to
    > DVD, assuming the media cost is about the same (say, 10 to 25 cents.)
    >
    > OT (?): Another factor to consider when making DVDs for archive/backup
    > purposes, is that multi-session is best avoided (IMO). I have accepted
    > that using DVD requires accepting the data in 4G blocks. That is also
    > fine because a local mandate requires that backup/archives be made using
    > encryption. I handle this requirement by creating a "loopback"
    > container of the appropriate size, and splitting into blocks, which
    > are written to DVD. I think that the max file size for any file on a
    > DVD is possibly 2^32 - 1. This command generates a container which will be
    > acceptable, if the disc is made with udf structures.
    >
    > dd if=/dev/zero of=container bs=1024 count=0 seek=4000000
    >
    > More discussion of encrypted containers is too far off topic, so I'll stop
    > here.
    >
    > As far as tools, k3b is a simple method for creating DVDs. But
    > lately, I have been using growisofs directly (steps documented below.)
    >
    > FWIW, here are the steps I perform to create a DVD using command-line
    > tools:
    >
    > 1. Create a top-level directory entry where the DVD's file/directory
    > structure will be assembled.
    > 2. Move (or hard-link) files into the directory structure for the DVD.
    > 3. Create and iso using mkisofs
    >
    > mkisofs -J -R -udf -o output.iso input_dir
    >
    > 4. Write iso to DVD using growisofs
    >
    > growisofs -dvd-compat -speed=4 -Z /dev/hdc=output.iso
    >
    > Pick a speed appropriate to your computer's throughput, and consider other
    > tasks which may be running, etc.
    >
    > 5. Eject DVD (reset drive)
    > 6. Verify DVD matches image (use md5sum)
    >
    > losetup /dev/loop0 output.iso
    > md5sum output.iso
    > dd if=/dev/hdc bs=512 count=$(blockdev --getsize /dev/loop0) | md5sum -
    >
    > 7. Clean up. Delete iso and working directories, etc.
    >
    > --
    > Douglas Mayne


    OK now assume I have downloaded the iso for Slackware-current.
    At what step do I start? At the losetup step? Would I be better off
    trying to use k3b? I just want to get from the downloaded image to a
    bootable Slackware install disk. I bought Maxell single sided DVD+R
    disks (4.7 Gigs).

    Thanks for all replies.

    John Culleton

  6. Re: Preferred DVD media.

    On Mon, 21 Jan 2008 13:27:32 -0800, john@wexfordpress.com wrote:

    >> 4. Write iso to DVD using growisofs
    >>
    >> growisofs -dvd-compat -speed=4 -Z /dev/hdc=output.iso
    >>
    >> Pick a speed appropriate to your computer's throughput, and consider other
    >> tasks which may be running, etc.
    >>
    >> 5. Eject DVD (reset drive)
    >> 6. Verify DVD matches image (use md5sum)
    >>
    >> losetup /dev/loop0 output.iso
    >> md5sum output.iso
    >> dd if=/dev/hdc bs=512 count=$(blockdev --getsize /dev/loop0) | md5sum -
    >>
    >> 7. Clean up. Delete iso and working directories, etc.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Douglas Mayne

    >
    > OK now assume I have downloaded the iso for Slackware-current.
    > At what step do I start? At the losetup step? Would I be better off
    > trying to use k3b? I just want to get from the downloaded image to a
    > bootable Slackware install disk. I bought Maxell single sided DVD+R
    > disks (4.7 Gigs).
    >
    > Thanks for all replies.
    >
    > John Culleton
    >

    In that case, you would proceed as follows:

    1. Verify downloaded iso is correct/complete. Check md5sum against known
    good value.
    2. Use writing tool of your choice to write the iso. Step 4 (above) shows
    a possible starting point. You could also use k3b; it's your choice. Make
    sure you review the docs, and remember to write the iso as an _image_,
    not a file.
    3. Verify DVD as written matches.

    --
    Douglas Mayne


  7. Re: Preferred DVD media.

    On Jan 21, 4:47 pm, Douglas Mayne wrote:
    > On Mon, 21 Jan 2008 13:27:32 -0800, j...@wexfordpress.com wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > >> 4. Write iso to DVD using growisofs

    >
    > >> growisofs -dvd-compat -speed=4 -Z /dev/hdc=output.iso

    >
    > >> Pick a speed appropriate to your computer's throughput, and consider other
    > >> tasks which may be running, etc.

    >
    > >> 5. Eject DVD (reset drive)
    > >> 6. Verify DVD matches image (use md5sum)

    >
    > >> losetup /dev/loop0 output.iso
    > >> md5sum output.iso
    > >> dd if=/dev/hdc bs=512 count=$(blockdev --getsize /dev/loop0) | md5sum -

    >
    > >> 7. Clean up. Delete iso and working directories, etc.

    >
    > >> --
    > >> Douglas Mayne

    >
    > > OK now assume I have downloaded the iso for Slackware-current.
    > > At what step do I start? At the losetup step? Would I be better off
    > > trying to use k3b? I just want to get from the downloaded image to a
    > > bootable Slackware install disk. I bought Maxell single sided DVD+R
    > > disks (4.7 Gigs).

    >
    > > Thanks for all replies.

    >
    > >JohnCulleton

    >
    > In that case, you would proceed as follows:
    >
    > 1. Verify downloaded iso is correct/complete. Check md5sum against known
    > good value.
    > 2. Use writing tool of your choice to write the iso. Step 4 (above) shows
    > a possible starting point. You could also use k3b; it's your choice. Make
    > sure you review the docs, and remember to write the iso as an _image_,
    > not a file.
    > 3. Verify DVD as written matches.
    >
    > --
    > Douglas Mayne


    Well I have slaughtered two disks so far. The first was done using
    cdrecord. It wrote the disk but the system won't boot from it and
    I can't mount it.

    The second I followed your step four except I substituted /dev/hdc
    for /dev/dvd because my Slack 12 system has no /dev/dvd. Again it
    seemed to burn the dvd, gave me completion messages etc. but at boot
    time the computer ignored it. I goes right in to lilo. When I try to
    pount it manually:
    mount /dev/hdc -t iso9660 /mnt/cdrom
    it complains about the superblock.

    A couple of questions:
    My dvd hardware was added after Slack 12 was installed some time back.
    There is no /dev/dvd. If I reinstall on a fresh partition is Slack
    likely to create a dvd device this time?

    2. The bios of my system will boot from cdrom but not from dvd, or at
    least the bios doesn't list dvd as a choice. Could this be the hangup?

    I'll kill no more innocent (and blank) dvd+r disks until I get your
    further guidance.

    John C.

  8. Re: Preferred DVD media.

    On Mon, 21 Jan 2008 14:28:02 -0800, john@wexfordpress.com wrote:

    >>
    >> In that case, you would proceed as follows:
    >>
    >> 1. Verify downloaded iso is correct/complete. Check md5sum against known
    >> good value.
    >> 2. Use writing tool of your choice to write the iso. Step 4 (above) shows
    >> a possible starting point. You could also use k3b; it's your choice. Make
    >> sure you review the docs, and remember to write the iso as an _image_,
    >> not a file.
    >> 3. Verify DVD as written matches.
    >>

    >
    > Well I have slaughtered two disks so far. The first was done using
    > cdrecord. It wrote the disk but the system won't boot from it and
    > I can't mount it.
    >
    > The second I followed your step four except I substituted /dev/hdc
    > for /dev/dvd because my Slack 12 system has no /dev/dvd. Again it
    > seemed to burn the dvd, gave me completion messages etc. but at boot
    > time the computer ignored it. I goes right in to lilo. When I try to
    > pount it manually:
    > mount /dev/hdc -t iso9660 /mnt/cdrom
    > it complains about the superblock.
    >
    > A couple of questions:
    > My dvd hardware was added after Slack 12 was installed some time back.
    > There is no /dev/dvd. If I reinstall on a fresh partition is Slack
    > likely to create a dvd device this time?
    >
    > 2. The bios of my system will boot from cdrom but not from dvd, or at
    > least the bios doesn't list dvd as a choice. Could this be the hangup?
    >
    > I'll kill no more innocent (and blank) dvd+r disks until I get your
    > further guidance.
    >
    > John C.
    >

    Sorry about your expensive coasters. I know there have been "issues"
    with BIOS booting certain optical discs. The fact that your disk is not
    mountable is a bad sign, though. Did you eject the disc after you made it?
    Did you attempt to verify it was correctly written? I don't have any
    specific knowledge about DVD+R. My experience is with DVD-R. Some googling
    on the topic appears to show that growisofs handles either format equally.
    I know that DVD-Rs are bootable, as an extension of CD-R. Most BIOS's will
    find either CD-R or DVD-R and boot from them (if the BIOS is set
    correctly.) I wouldn't expect that DVD+R behave differently, but _I could
    be wrong_. Someone else is likely to know the specifics of DVD+R.

    As far as your device names, it shouldn't be too difficult to find how the
    drive is named. AFAIK, the install only sets a symbolic link to
    /dev/cdrom, /dev/dvd as a simple alias only. The real device is likely to
    be /dev/hdx, /dev/srx, and you could set it yourself if necessary.

    --
    Douglas Mayne

  9. Re: Preferred DVD media.

    Douglas Mayne (doug@sl12.localnet) writes:

    > As far as your device names, it shouldn't be too difficult to find how the
    > drive is named. AFAIK, the install only sets a symbolic link to
    > /dev/cdrom, /dev/dvd as a simple alias only. The real device is likely to
    > be /dev/hdx, /dev/srx, and you could set it yourself if necessary.
    >

    Or not fuss with it at all.

    It's easier to remember that /dev/dvd is the dvd drive than /dev/hdc
    or /dev/sr0 or whatever, so the symlink is just a convenience to a large
    extent. Since it is a symlink, there's no difference and any time
    /dev/dvd is used, one could just just use whatever it points to.

    The caveat being that some programs default to /dev/cdrom or /dev/dvd
    (obviously depending on what the software is for), and without the link
    one has to adjust the software, either in the config file or command
    line switches or a menu in a GUI program. I suppose there is even software
    that uses /dev/cdrom or /dev/dvd and leaves no way to change it.

    As for DVD writing, I got a stack of a hundred for less than I pay for
    fifty blank CDs, so wasting a few shouldn't be a problem. On the other
    hand, the failed ones often don't give much clue as to why they failed,
    so it's harder to learn from the mistake. I know I had a bit of success
    and then failure when I tried dvd writing for the first time a few
    months ago, and sicne my initial need had passed, I put it aside and
    one of these days I plan to figure out why things didn't go right. DVDRWs
    have the advantage that you can play around without wasting anything, but
    surely must include their own idiosyncrasies that have to be worked out
    too.

    Michael


  10. Re: Preferred DVD media.

    john@wexfordpress.com wrote:
    > My new CD/DVD rw drive will handle several kinds of DVD media but I
    > have thus far only used it with CDs. I use cdrecord for writing CDs
    > and would do the same for DVDs. For such things as recording the
    > latest Slackware release, is there one form of DVD media that is
    > preferred over another? I am planning to continue to use cdrecord. I
    > don't plan on using rewritable media but just writable.


    You can't really trust just the brand name as they manufacture all over the
    place. I noticed this with CDR disks. The best are typically made in
    Japan. Sometimes you can find the Japanese stuff sitting right there with
    the other stuff, all with the same name brand. I typically just look through
    the selection that is available whenever I'm at one of the computer places,
    and pick up some of the Jap stuff when it is available. The real benefit
    to "the good stuff" is that it is supposed to last longer than the
    cheap stuff. A friend who burns movies all the time must buy the cheapest
    crap he can find - he can watch the movie twice, then it starts to skip
    and eventually fail.

    - Kurt

  11. Re: Preferred DVD media.

    john@wexfordpress.com wrote:

    > My new CD/DVD rw drive will handle several kinds of DVD media but I
    > have thus far only used it with CDs. I use cdrecord for writing CDs
    > and would do the same for DVDs. For such things as recording the
    > latest Slackware release, is there one form of DVD media that is
    > preferred over another? I am planning to continue to use cdrecord. I
    > don't plan on using rewritable media but just writable.
    >
    > John Culleton.


    I use K3B to burn cd/dvd all the time without a problem
    If your willing to give it a try ...
    Put Ramen noodles into microwave (might need root for this)
    go back to computer and make sure your permissions are set in K3B setup
    Once done set microwave to 3 minutes and click start.
    While your clicking on things..click on K3B in the multimedia section of KDE
    In the main K3B window click on "Further Actions" Check on ramen
    Click on "Burn Iso Image"
    Add Image to be burned to dvd and flavor packet to ramen
    Click "burn image"
    Remove ramen from microwave (caution Items maybe hot to the touch)
    when ramen has cooled down....Enjoy
    Oh the dvd should be done as well
    HTH
    MikeinAK
    P.S. the steps listed above were performed using cheapo Compusa DVD media
    and nissin ramen noodles no tupperware was damaged during the cooking
    process,


  12. Re: Preferred DVD media.

    On Mon, 21 Jan 2008 08:57:35 -0800, john@wexfordpress.com wrote:

    > My new CD/DVD rw drive will handle several kinds of DVD media but I have
    > thus far only used it with CDs. I use cdrecord for writing CDs and would
    > do the same for DVDs. For such things as recording the latest Slackware
    > release, is there one form of DVD media that is preferred over another? I
    > am planning to continue to use cdrecord. I don't plan on using rewritable
    > media but just writable.
    >
    > John Culleton.


    After reading all the replies thus far, I don't know what you're asking
    for or if you got what you wanted, John, but here's a page claiming that
    Taiyo Yuden makes the best optical media:

    http://club.cdfreaks.com/f33/taiyo-yuden-faq-178622/

    --
    Chick Tower

    For e-mail: aols2 DOT sent DOT towerboy AT xoxy DOT net


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