makepkg -l y - Slackware

This is a discussion on makepkg -l y - Slackware ; What is the aim of that switch? What is the difference, once the package installed, with or without it? Thanks. -- On dira ce qu'on voudra, j'étais pas un petit loubard comme les autres. (Rocky)...

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Thread: makepkg -l y

  1. makepkg -l y

    What is the aim of that switch?
    What is the difference, once the package installed, with or without it?

    Thanks.

    --
    On dira ce qu'on voudra, j'étais pas un petit loubard comme les autres.
    (Rocky)

  2. Re: makepkg -l y

    ciol wrote:
    >What is the aim of that switch?
    >What is the difference, once the package installed, with or without it?


    When making a package, Slackware removes the symbolic links and puts
    commands to recreate them in the doinst.sh script (if so-requested).

    But I don't know why, actually. Maybe some tars don't handle them
    correctly? Did busybox always handle it?

    -Beej


  3. Re: makepkg -l y

    On 2008-01-20, ciol wrote:
    > What is the aim of that switch?
    > What is the difference, once the package installed, with or without it?



    Well, the first part has already been answered, but just for good measure:
    the "-l" switch removes symbolic links from the package tree and writes
    them to $package_tree/install/doinst.sh
    When installpkg(8) is invoked on the resulting package, the package
    contents (including ./install/) are dropped into place on the system,
    and then the ./install/doinst.sh is executed with /bin/sh.

    With respect to why it's done and what the practical difference is,
    well, that's a little more involved. One reason is "accounting" -
    while it's certainly possible (assuming symlinks are not removed) to
    pull a list of symlinks from the package, it would be much slower than
    what's currently in place. That would require putting information about
    which package "files" are *actually* symlinks in /var/log/packages, and
    that would break compatibility.

    A bigger concern, though, is this: what happens if your package contains
    a symlink at some location, and there's already a directory in existence
    with that same name? What happens to the symlink when tar extracts it?


    This last point really isn't an issue, as pkgtool and friends don't use
    newer tar versions, but... iirc, the newer tar versions consider
    relative path symlinks as a "security risk" (I don't recall all of the
    details on this, and it's entirely possible that I'm remembering it at
    least partially wrong, but I don't think so) and thus would be somewhat
    problematic for some packages.

    Hope that helps,
    -RW

  4. Re: makepkg -l y

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    On 2008-01-29, Robby Workman wrote:
    > A bigger concern, though, is this: what happens if your package contains
    > a symlink at some location, and there's already a directory in existence
    > with that same name? What happens to the symlink when tar extracts it?


    Or simply, what happens when you use -root /some/other/root?

    - --
    It is better to hear the rebuke of the wise,
    Than for a man to hear the song of fools.
    Ecclesiastes 7:5
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  5. Re: makepkg -l y

    On 2008-01-29, +Alan Hicks+ wrote:
    >
    > On 2008-01-29, Robby Workman wrote:
    >> A bigger concern, though, is this: what happens if your package contains
    >> a symlink at some location, and there's already a directory in existence
    >> with that same name? What happens to the symlink when tar extracts it?

    >
    > Or simply, what happens when you use -root /some/other/root?



    Yeah, that was a rhetorical question...
    Yours is probably a better one, for what it's worth. I'd have to go
    digging (again) into the installpkg(8) code to see exactly what would
    happen, but from memory, it's not what is desired.

    -RW

  6. Re: makepkg -l y

    Robby Workman wrote:

    >> ... what happens when you use -root /some/other/root?

    >
    > ... I'd have to go digging (again) into the installpkg(8) code to see
    > exactly what would happen, but from memory, it's not what is desired.


    It depends, of course, on whether the symlink points to a relative path
    or not ...

    --
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Sylvain Robitaille syl@alcor.concordia.ca

    Network and Systems analyst Concordia University
    Instructional & Information Technology Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

  7. Re: makepkg -l y

    On Jan 29, 9:23 am, +Alan Hicks+ wrote:

    >
    > On 2008-01-29, Robby Workman wrote:
    >
    > > A bigger concern, though, is this: what happens if your package contains
    > > a symlink at some location, and there's already a directory in existence
    > > with that same name? What happens to the symlink when tar extracts it?

    >
    > Or simply, what happens when you use -root /some/other/root?


    That's one of the stupidest sentences I've ever read. The sort of
    crap that pretenders post when they want to be accepted as
    experts but are way out of their league.


    Tom


  8. Re: makepkg -l y

    Tom N wrote:

    >> Or simply, what happens when you use -root /some/other/root?

    >
    > That's one of the stupidest sentences I've ever read. The sort of
    > crap that pretenders post when they want to be accepted as
    > experts but are way out of their league.


    Perhaps you could enlighten those of us who are mere "dumb and dependent
    appliance operators" what does happen when one uses the
    command -root /some/other/root?
    --
    Two Ravens
    "...hit the squirrel..."

  9. Re: makepkg -l y

    On Wed, 30 Jan 2008 03:26:16 -0800, Tom N wrote:

    >> > A bigger concern, though, is this: what happens if your package contains
    >> > a symlink at some location, and there's already a directory in existence
    >> > with that same name? What happens to the symlink when tar extracts it?


    >> Or simply, what happens when you use -root /some/other/root?


    > That's one of the stupidest sentences I've ever read.


    That's because you've never built a package, and will never be capable of
    doing so, n00b.

    > Tom


    You mean "Alan Connor".


    --
    "Tom N" - the latest nymshift of "Alan Connor".
    Read more about the netkook Alan Connor here:
    http://www.pearlgates.net/nanae/kooks/ac/fga.shtml


  10. Re: makepkg -l y

    On 2008-01-30, Sylvain Robitaille wrote:
    > Robby Workman wrote:
    >
    >>> ... what happens when you use -root /some/other/root?

    >>
    >> ... I'd have to go digging (again) into the installpkg(8) code to see
    >> exactly what would happen, but from memory, it's not what is desired.

    >
    > It depends, of course, on whether the symlink points to a relative path
    > or not ...



    Indeed it does

    -RW

  11. Re: makepkg -l y

    On 2008-01-30, Tom N wrote:
    > On Jan 29, 9:23 am, +Alan Hicks+ wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> On 2008-01-29, Robby Workman wrote:
    >>
    >> > A bigger concern, though, is this: what happens if your package contains
    >> > a symlink at some location, and there's already a directory in existence
    >> > with that same name? What happens to the symlink when tar extracts it?

    >>
    >> Or simply, what happens when you use -root /some/other/root?

    >
    > That's one of the stupidest sentences I've ever read. The sort of
    > crap that pretenders post when they want to be accepted as
    > experts but are way out of their league.



    Actually, no, it's not. Since you understand bash so well, you should be
    able to explore the code in /sbin/installpkg to see that Alan has a valid
    point.

    -RW

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