Making my own Slackware Live CD - Slackware

This is a discussion on Making my own Slackware Live CD - Slackware ; I've been trying to build a slackware live cd (11.0) from these instructions http://www.linuxpackages.net/howto.p...e=livecd+HOWTO It LOOKS like everything is ready to go, but I seem to have run into a problem. Since I do not have a "ready to boot ...

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Thread: Making my own Slackware Live CD

  1. Making my own Slackware Live CD

    I've been trying to build a slackware live cd (11.0) from these
    instructions

    http://www.linuxpackages.net/howto.p...e=livecd+HOWTO

    It LOOKS like everything is ready to go, but I seem to have run into a
    problem. Since I do not have a "ready to boot linux disk" as mentioned in
    the instructions, I'm using the isolinux directory from install disk 1.
    This brings up the disk to boot OK, but it's the same as booting to the
    cfdisk and setup prompt of the install cd instead of the freshly built
    system on the cd. Guess my question is "where can I download the proper
    isolinux directory?" or "How do I work around this?"

  2. Re: Making my own Slackware Live CD

    On Sat, 24 Nov 2007 22:59:41 GMT, Leonard The Committed wrote:

    >I've been trying to build a slackware live cd (11.0) from these
    >instructions
    >
    >http://www.linuxpackages.net/howto.p...e=livecd+HOWTO
    >
    >It LOOKS like everything is ready to go, but I seem to have run into a
    >problem. Since I do not have a "ready to boot linux disk" as mentioned in
    >the instructions, I'm using the isolinux directory from install disk 1.


    Wont CD 2 from slack-10 do it for you?

    Grant.

  3. Re: Making my own Slackware Live CD

    On Sun, 25 Nov 2007 11:42:27 +1100, Grant wrote:
    > On Sat, 24 Nov 2007 22:59:41 GMT, Leonard The Committed
    > wrote:
    >
    >>I've been trying to build a slackware live cd (11.0) from these
    >>instructions
    >>
    >>http://www.linuxpackages.net/howto.p...e=livecd+HOWTO
    >>
    >>It LOOKS like everything is ready to go, but I seem to have run into a
    >>problem. Since I do not have a "ready to boot linux disk" as mentioned
    >>in the instructions, I'm using the isolinux directory from install disk
    >>1.

    >
    > Wont CD 2 from slack-10 do it for you?


    Yes, you'll need the isolinux directory from the live CD that was
    included with older Slackware Linux releases. These days, customizing
    Slax is definitely the easier way to go. It can easily be extended with
    modules, which can be created from Slackware packages.

    -- Daniel

  4. Re: Making my own Slackware Live CD

    On Sun, 25 Nov 2007 11:42:27 +1100, Grant wrote:


    > Wont CD 2 from slack-10 do it for you?
    >
    > Grant.


    I've tried CD 2 from 10.0, but the same sort of issue pops up. It boots
    into rescue mode, same as disk 2 was meant to do.


  5. Re: Making my own Slackware Live CD


    > Yes, you'll need the isolinux directory from the live CD that was
    > included with older Slackware Linux releases. These days, customizing
    > Slax is definitely the easier way to go. It can easily be extended with
    > modules, which can be created from Slackware packages.
    >
    > -- Daniel


    I'm grabbing a copy of 9.1 disk 2 as I write this. Hopefully I can get
    better results than I've had up til now.

    Sure, Slax would do what I want, but I'm looking for something to do so
    this is what this is really all about. I've got a laptop with a dying HD
    and was thinking of having it boot up to Amarok with nothing else on it.
    I've always wanted to try something like this.


  6. Re: Making my own Slackware Live CD

    On Sun, 25 Nov 2007 16:46:20 +0000, Leonard The Committed wrote:

    >> Yes, you'll need the isolinux directory from the live CD that was
    >> included with older Slackware Linux releases. These days, customizing
    >> Slax is definitely the easier way to go. It can easily be extended with
    >> modules, which can be created from Slackware packages.
    >>
    >> -- Daniel

    >
    > I'm grabbing a copy of 9.1 disk 2 as I write this. Hopefully I can get
    > better results than I've had up til now.
    >
    > Sure, Slax would do what I want, but I'm looking for something to do so
    > this is what this is really all about. I've got a laptop with a dying HD
    > and was thinking of having it boot up to Amarok with nothing else on it.
    > I've always wanted to try something like this.


    The way slax is created is documented at

    http://www.linux-live.org/

    where you can download the latest guide as a pdf.

  7. Re: Making my own Slackware Live CD

    On Sun, 25 Nov 2007 16:46:20 +0000, Leonard The Committed wrote:

    >
    >> Yes, you'll need the isolinux directory from the live CD that was
    >> included with older Slackware Linux releases. These days, customizing
    >> Slax is definitely the easier way to go. It can easily be extended with
    >> modules, which can be created from Slackware packages.
    >>
    >> -- Daniel

    >
    > I'm grabbing a copy of 9.1 disk 2 as I write this. Hopefully I can get
    > better results than I've had up til now.
    >
    > Sure, Slax would do what I want, but I'm looking for something to do so
    > this is what this is really all about. I've got a laptop with a dying HD
    > and was thinking of having it boot up to Amarok with nothing else on it.
    > I've always wanted to try something like this.
    >

    If you are truly interested in doing it for yourself, then perhaps what I
    have done will help. I wrote this DIY a while ago:

    http://www.xmission.com/~ddmayne2/10.2-live/

    The above project uses unionfs.

    Also, this encryption project:
    http://www.xmission.com/~ddmayne2/erf-dm/

    The above project uses device mapper.

    It seems that unionfs has become deprecated relative to device mapper's
    snapshot modules. Therefore, I think the initrd from erf-dm is the best
    starting poin now. I have used it before to roll your my own live CD, even
    though there are some manual steps. I would use device mapper if you are
    planning on using the recent kernels. This article is most informative
    about device mapper: http://linuxgazette.net/114/kapil.html

    Besides the kernel and initrd, you'll need a base loopback root filesystem
    and an associated "rw" snapshot component. IIRC, a complete Slackware v.12
    installed on "loopback" will fit on a bootable DVD. The obstacle which
    goes counter to the "live CD" model, is that you must have a device
    target for the rw component. A matching 4G disk allocation (on a magnetic
    disk is best, IMO). If you aren't worried about flash rw lifetimes, then
    perhaps a flash disk works, too.

    If you want, I can post a COW setup script. The steps to getting this
    working remain non-trivial, though:

    1. Boot with kernel and initrd from erf-dm. Specify linuxrc=/bin/bash
    2. Manually tweak linuxrc to allow user to manually setup the COW device.
    3. exec ./linuxrc
    4. The tweak applied in step 2 (not shown), spawns a bash shell
    which _the user_ uses to manually setup the COW and to modify the
    configuration file, etab. When the changes are complete, then restart
    the linuxrc with "exit"
    5. If you did the above steps correctly, then initrd will
    complete execution and transfer execution to Slackware's normal startup
    scripts via, /sbin/init.

    Like I said, it remains a non-trivial exercise. But if all you are looking
    for is confirmation that it is possible, then I can tell you it does work!

    --
    Douglas Mayne


  8. Re: Making my own Slackware Live CD


    > I'm grabbing a copy of 9.1 disk 2 as I write this. Hopefully I can get
    > better results than I've had up til now.


    That took care of it. Thanks for everyones input, especially to Daniel for
    writing such a good how-to that even a point-and-crunt guy can follow.



  9. Re: Making my own Slackware Live CD

    On Sat, 24 Nov 2007 22:59:41 GMT
    Leonard The Committed wrote:

    > I've been trying to build a slackware live cd (11.0) from these
    > instructions
    >
    > http://www.linuxpackages.net/howto.p...e=livecd+HOWTO
    >


    I think, the easiest way to build a custom Slackware live CD
    is to use the following: 1) a Slackware system that fits your
    needs, 2) Linux live scripts and 3) a pre-built kernel from Slax.
    Instructions are available on http://www.linux-live.org/

    I have a router/firewall working from such a live CD for a few months
    now, and it works fine.

    M.

  10. Re: Making my own Slackware Live CD

    On Nov 25, 11:53 am, Douglas Mayne wrote:
    > On Sun, 25 Nov 2007 16:46:20 +0000, Leonard The Committed wrote:
    >
    > >> Yes, you'll need the isolinux directory from the live CD that was
    > >> included with older Slackware Linux releases. These days, customizing
    > >> Slax is definitely the easier way to go. It can easily be extended with
    > >> modules, which can be created from Slackware packages.

    >
    > >> -- Daniel

    >
    > > I'm grabbing a copy of 9.1 disk 2 as I write this. Hopefully I can get
    > > better results than I've had up til now.

    >
    > > Sure, Slax would do what I want, but I'm looking for something to do so
    > > this is what this is really all about. I've got a laptop with a dying HD
    > > and was thinking of having it boot up to Amarok with nothing else on it.
    > > I've always wanted to try something like this.

    >
    > If you are truly interested in doing it for yourself, then perhaps what I
    > have done will help. I wrote this DIY a while ago:
    >
    > http://www.xmission.com/~ddmayne2/10.2-live/
    >
    > The above project uses unionfs.
    >
    > Also, this encryption project:http://www.xmission.com/~ddmayne2/erf-dm/
    >
    > The above project uses device mapper.
    >
    > It seems that unionfs has become deprecated relative to device mapper's
    > snapshot modules. Therefore, I think the initrd from erf-dm is the best
    > starting poin now. I have used it before to roll your my own live CD, even
    > though there are some manual steps. I would use device mapper if you are
    > planning on using the recent kernels. This article is most informative
    > about device mapper:http://linuxgazette.net/114/kapil.html
    >
    > Besides the kernel and initrd, you'll need a base loopback root filesystem
    > and an associated "rw" snapshot component. IIRC, a complete Slackware v.12
    > installed on "loopback" will fit on a bootable DVD. The obstacle which
    > goes counter to the "live CD" model, is that you must have a device
    > target for the rw component. A matching 4G disk allocation (on a magnetic
    > disk is best, IMO). If you aren't worried about flash rw lifetimes, then
    > perhaps a flash disk works, too.
    >
    > If you want, I can post a COW setup script. The steps to getting this
    > working remain non-trivial, though:
    >
    > 1. Boot with kernel and initrd from erf-dm. Specify linuxrc=/bin/bash
    > 2. Manually tweak linuxrc to allow user to manually setup the COW device.
    > 3. exec ./linuxrc
    > 4. The tweak applied in step 2 (not shown), spawns a bash shell
    > which _the user_ uses to manually setup the COW and to modify the
    > configuration file, etab. When the changes are complete, then restart
    > the linuxrc with "exit"
    > 5. If you did the above steps correctly, then initrd will
    > complete execution and transfer execution to Slackware's normal startup
    > scripts via, /sbin/init.
    >
    > Like I said, it remains a non-trivial exercise. But if all you are looking
    > for is confirmation that it is possible, then I can tell you it does work!
    >
    > --
    > Douglas Mayne


    Hi,

    I would be interested in looking at the 'COW' script that you are
    speaking of.

  11. Re: Making my own Slackware Live CD

    > These days, customizing
    > Slax is definitely the easier way to go. It can easily be extended with
    > modules, which can be created from Slackware packages.
    >
    > -- Daniel


    I'm getting my feet wet with it right now. Thanks again

  12. Re: Making my own Slackware Live CD

    On Tue, 27 Nov 2007 04:54:47 -0800, onebuck wrote:

    >>
    >> If you want, I can post a COW setup script. The steps to getting this
    >> working remain non-trivial, though:
    >>
    >> 1. Boot with kernel and initrd from erf-dm. Specify linuxrc=/bin/bash
    >> 2. Manually tweak linuxrc to allow user to manually setup the COW device.
    >> 3. exec ./linuxrc
    >> 4. The tweak applied in step 2 (not shown), spawns a bash shell
    >> which _the user_ uses to manually setup the COW and to modify the
    >> configuration file, etab. When the changes are complete, then restart
    >> the linuxrc with "exit"
    >> 5. If you did the above steps correctly, then initrd will
    >> complete execution and transfer execution to Slackware's normal startup
    >> scripts via, /sbin/init.
    >>
    >> Like I said, it remains a non-trivial exercise. But if all you are looking
    >> for is confirmation that it is possible, then I can tell you it does work!
    >>
    >> --
    >> Douglas Mayne

    >
    > Hi,
    >
    > I would be interested in looking at the 'COW' script that you are
    > speaking of.
    >

    Sorry for the delay in posting this response. I wanted to do a bit more
    work on the design of my startup environment first. I have changed my
    startup environment to be compatible with the official Slackware compiled
    kernels again. The recent Slackware kernels use ramfs (and switch_root),
    whereas my earlier design was an initrd built on ext2 (and used
    pivot_root.)

    This new startup environment will be called "dm-live", as in
    "device mapper live."

    I'll probably build a web site for it in the near future. Right now,
    it remains a bit rough. For example, the user must setup his device mapper
    objects manually, load modules, etc. without help. As I said, it remains
    a non-trivial exercise. As of now, I have updated my project to include
    the following components inside of the initrd:

    Kernel: 2.6.23.9-smp
    Busybox: 1.8.2 (shared library mode)
    Libraries: (updated to Slackware 12)

    The key component to this startup environment is the program "init."
    This program is executed at boot. It performs some initial checking and
    setup operations, and then gives the user a bash shell from which
    additional manual setup can occur. The user can load additional modules,
    setup device-mapper objects, specify the root device, etc. When finished,
    the user "exits" from this bash shell, and init resumes execution. It then
    attempts to mount the specified root filesystem, and if found, takes the
    final steps to transfer to /sbin/init.

    This environmnent is encapsulated as a bootable iso, about 30M in size.
    Note: This is a minimal startup environment only. It should be used in
    conjunction with Slackware installed on a loopback file or device.
    Perhaps, an example would help to clarify how to set this up.

    An Example...
    Lets assume that a CD has been prepared which contains a basic Slackware
    v.12 which was already pre-installed on a loopback file. That preset
    installation was setup to fit within the maximum size for a CD image-
    all of the installed packages must fit, say, about 500M. This RO file is
    to be "paired" with a RW device, say a flash drive. Also, assume that a
    matching 500M file has been allocated on a 512M flash device/partition.
    On our hardware, Linux will recognize the cd device as /dev/hdc, and
    the flash drive is connected via a usb port and will be known as
    /dev/sda when the usb modules load and stabilize.

    To begin, prepare the iso to a bootable CD. When it's ready, boot it.
    After it boots, and the first message is displayed remove the CD and
    replace it with the CD which contains the base system (loopback). Also,
    insert the flash drive into the USB port which contains the RW component.
    Continue execution of init by pressing "enter." At this point, the
    user bash shell will be presented. This is the environment where the
    manual tweaks should be applied. Here are the manual commands which
    are necessary on my system to setup this example:

    bash-3.1# modprobe iso9660
    bash-3.1# modprobe uhci-hcd
    bash-3.1# modprobe ehci-hcd
    bash-3.1# modprobe ohci-hcd
    bash-3.1# modprobe usb-storage
    bash-3.1# cd /tmpfs
    bash-3.1# mount /dev/hdc ro_dev
    bash-3.1# losetup /dev/loop0 ro_dev/loop.basic/slack12.xfs
    bash-3.1# mount /dev/sda1 rw_dev
    bash-3.1# losetup /dev/loop1 rw_dev/rw
    bash-3.1# BS=$(blockdev --getsize /dev/loop0)
    bash-3.1# echo 0 $BS snapshot /dev/loop0 /dev/loop1 p 32 | dmsetup create top
    bash-3.1# cd /
    bash-3.1# echo ROOT_DEV=/dev/mapper/top >>user.inp
    bash-3.1# echo ROOT_FS=xfs >>user.inp
    bash-3.1# exit

    This bash shell will terminate with the exit command. The "init" program
    resumes where it left off. If all goes as expected, then the root
    filesystem will be mounted and control will transfer to the real init.

    The next interesting example uses two 4G flash drives: one for the RO
    component, and another for the RW component (not shown).

    Let me know if you'd like me to make the 30M download available, or
    would like to see the code for "init", etc.

    Here is a startup log for this "rough draft" of the project,
    just to show it does work, even though it still requires a
    medium-sized hammer to get it going. ;-)

    2007-12-03.231043: Welcome to dm-live, init by Douglas Mayne
    Status: This is version: 0.0.1
    Status: Using kernel 2.6.23.9-smp
    Status: Loading kernel modules as specified in file, /modules.init
    Status: /device/mapper/control exists.
    Status: Initial free memory: 466492 kB
    Status: Saved kernel modules to new root: dm-live/lib/modules/2.6.23.9-smp
    Status: Created symbolic link to kernel modules on new root.

    --
    Douglas Mayne

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