[OT] FAQ Mod Quotes -- (updated: Sweetmorn, the 67th day of Bureaucracy in the YOLD 3171) - Slackware

This is a discussion on [OT] FAQ Mod Quotes -- (updated: Sweetmorn, the 67th day of Bureaucracy in the YOLD 3171) - Slackware ; FAQ Mod Quotes -- (updated: Sweetmorn, the 67th day of Bureaucracy in the YOLD 3171) Sample Mod Quote: +----------------------------------------------------------------------+ You have had your hand held by other distros. Slackware won't do as much for you as they do. If you ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: [OT] FAQ Mod Quotes -- (updated: Sweetmorn, the 67th day of Bureaucracy in the YOLD 3171)

  1. [OT] FAQ Mod Quotes -- (updated: Sweetmorn, the 67th day of Bureaucracy in the YOLD 3171)


    FAQ Mod Quotes -- (updated: Sweetmorn, the 67th day of Bureaucracy in
    the YOLD 3171)

    Sample Mod Quote:

    +----------------------------------------------------------------------+

    You have had your hand held by other distros. Slackware won't do as
    much for you as they do. If you want to learn how things work, that's
    great, because you will. But if you just want things to work for you
    without caring about how and why it did, Slackware's a poor fit.
    -- /dev/rob0

    +----------------------------------------------------------------------+

    Every so often you will see a post letting people know that an
    updated Best of alt.os.linux.slackware Fortune Mod is available
    for download. The url is:


    This fortune mod is a collection of quotes either seen on AOLS
    or by AOLS regulars that were deemed so wise, funny, inflammatory
    or any combination of those that they were submitted for inclusion.

    Please take the time to follow the guidelines at the URL above
    and see to it that there will be a next release, as others have
    done to make the past releases possible.




  2. Re: [OT] FAQ Mod Quotes -- (updated: Sweetmorn, the 67th day of Bureaucracy in the YOLD 3171)

    ModQuote_FAQ@dev.null says:

    >You have had your hand held by other distros. Slackware won't do as
    >much for you as they do. If you want to learn how things work, that's
    >great, because you will. But if you just want things to work for you
    >without caring about how and why it did, Slackware's a poor fit.
    > -- /dev/rob0


    This is a troll, right? The only thing you learn about slackware,
    is slackware. And knowing slackware does not mean that you know
    more about your computer. It only means that you know more about
    slackware. And if you learn more when you learn slackware, that's
    because slackware is more difficult to learn. There is no reward,
    however, for the extra effort it takes to learn slackware. All it
    means is that you know how to run slackware.

    There's a real modquote.

    cordially, as always,

    rm

  3. Re: [OT] FAQ Mod Quotes -- (updated: Sweetmorn, the 67th day of Bureaucracy in the YOLD 3171)

    Realto Margarino wrote:

    > This is a troll, right?


    It's a quote from someone far brighter than you.

    > The only thing you learn about slackware,
    > is slackware. And knowing slackware does not mean that you know
    > more about your computer.


    In common usage (read "not dip****-speak") a "computer" is a system
    consisting of both hardware and software. And, in fact, learning to use
    Slackware will very likely cause one to learn something about the hardware,
    as well.

    > It only means that you know more about
    > slackware. And if you learn more when you learn slackware, that's
    > because slackware is more difficult to learn.


    Wrong. Slackware is no more difficult to learn than any other OS. This is
    a myth propagated by Redhat in ancient times.

    > There is no reward,
    > however, for the extra effort it takes to learn slackware. All it
    > means is that you know how to run slackware.


    Which is a reward in itself.

    > There's a real modquote.


    No. "Try not to be such a dip****, Roger" would be a real modquote.

    --
    Old Man

    "Swagger isn't courage." Lee Iacocca

  4. Re: [OT] FAQ Mod Quotes -- (updated: Sweetmorn, the 67th day ofBureaucracy in the YOLD 3171)

    Old Man wrote:
    > No. "Try not to be such a dip****, Roger" would be a real modquote.


    No. That would be a contradiction in terms.

    --
    Ayaz Ahmed Khan

  5. Re: [OT] FAQ Mod Quotes -- (updated: Sweetmorn, the 67th day ofBureaucracy in the YOLD 3171)

    On Thu, 22 Nov 2007 17:58:22 +0000, Ayaz Ahmed Khan wrote:

    Hello Ayaz ;-) {new temporary local netiquette enforcement :~}

    > Old Man wrote:
    >> No. "Try not to be such a dip****, Roger" would be a real modquote.

    >
    > No. That would be a contradiction in terms.


    Almost agreed, not that much a contradiction but a
    real mess, these would've been quite different cases:

    "****, Roger, try not to be so deep"

    "Such a deep **** try not to be" --- "Roger"

    "Such a try to be Roger? Not in deep ****!"

    oh, well...-)

  6. Re: [OT] FAQ Mod Quotes -- (updated: Sweetmorn, the 67th day of Bureaucracy in the YOLD 3171)

    Old Man says:
    >Realto Margarino wrote:


    >> This is a troll, right?


    >It's a quote from someone far brighter than you.


    >> The only thing you learn about slackware, is slackware. And
    >> knowing slackware does not mean that you know more about your
    >> computer.


    >In common usage (read "not dip****-speak") a "computer" is a system
    >consisting of both hardware and software. And, in fact, learning
    >to use Slackware will very likely cause one to learn something
    >about the hardware, as well.


    You won't learn any more about your hardware using slackware than
    you will using any other OS. In fact, since learning just about any
    other OS is easier and faster than learning slackware, you'll find
    it easier and faster to learn about hardware when you are using any
    OS besides slackware.

    >> It only means that you know more about slackware. And if you
    >> learn more when you learn slackware, that's because slackware is
    >> more difficult to learn.


    >Wrong. Slackware is no more difficult to learn than any other OS.
    >This is a myth propagated by Redhat in ancient times.


    Nope. In order to admin a windoze station or server you only have
    to know how to use a mouse. That simply ain't the case with
    slackware.

    >> There is no reward, however, for the extra effort it takes to
    >> learn slackware. All it means is that you know how to run
    >> slackware.


    >Which is a reward in itself.


    Well, yeah, if your head is jammed up your ass, you're bored to
    death, and the only book on the shelf is one about slackware. But
    most of us wish we had done more with our lives other than
    dedicating huge chunks of those lives to learning unix shell
    commands...

    >> There's a real modquote.


    >No. "Try not to be such a dip****, Roger" would be a real modquote.


    Who is "Roger" is one question. What's a dip**** is another
    question. And how old are you, really, is a third, although of far
    less interest...

    cordially, as always,

    rm

  7. Re: [OT] FAQ Mod Quotes -- (updated: Sweetmorn, the 67th day of Bureaucracy in the YOLD 3171)

    Hallo, Old,

    Du (bill) meintest am 21.11.07:

    > In common usage (read "not dip****-speak") a "computer" is a system
    > consisting of both hardware and software. And, in fact, learning to
    > use Slackware will very likely cause one to learn something about the
    > hardware, as well.


    I have installed many packets in the last 12 years, I have compiled many
    packets too.
    I have learned nothing about the keyboard in this way, nothing about
    PCBs, nothing about multilayers, nothing avout fans, and so on.

    Viele Gruesse!
    Helmut


  8. Re: [OT] FAQ Mod Quotes -- (updated: Sweetmorn, the 67th day of Bureaucracy in the YOLD 3171)

    Realto Margarino wrote:

    >>> The only thing you learn about slackware, is slackware. And
    >>> knowing slackware does not mean that you know more about your
    >>> computer.

    >
    >>In common usage (read "not dip****-speak") a "computer" is a system
    >>consisting of both hardware and software. And, in fact, learning
    >>to use Slackware will very likely cause one to learn something
    >>about the hardware, as well.

    >
    > You won't learn any more about your hardware using slackware than
    > you will using any other OS.


    Maybe, but what you said was, "The only thing you learn about slackware, is
    slackware. And knowing slackware does not mean that you know more about
    your computer."

    > In fact, since learning just about any
    > other OS is easier and faster than learning slackware, you'll find
    > it easier and faster to learn about hardware when you are using any
    > OS besides slackware.


    No I won't. I know, because I didn't.

    > Nope. In order to admin a windoze station or server you only have
    > to know how to use a mouse. That simply ain't the case with
    > slackware.


    I have a four-year-old great-nephew who's great with a mouse. How much do
    you pay?

    > Well, yeah, if your head is jammed up your ass, you're bored to
    > death, and the only book on the shelf is one about slackware.


    Or if you're interested in many things, this being one, and just generally
    find learning anything new more rewarding than being a dip****.

    > But most of us wish we had done more with our lives other than
    > dedicating huge chunks of those lives to learning unix shell
    > commands...


    "Huge chunks," huh? Slow learner?

    > Who is "Roger" is one question.


    We've already done that. Who is not Roger.

    > What's a dip**** is another
    > question.


    Google is your friend, but here's a hint. Dip****s are prone to say things
    like, "In order to admin a windoze station or server you only have to know
    how to use a mouse."

    --
    Old Man

    "Swagger isn't courage." Lee Iacocca

  9. Re: [OT] FAQ Mod Quotes -- (updated: Sweetmorn, the 67th day of Bureaucracy in the YOLD 3171)

    Helmut Hullen wrote:

    > I have installed many packets in the last 12 years, I have compiled many
    > packets too.
    > I have learned nothing about the keyboard in this way, nothing about
    > PCBs, nothing about multilayers, nothing avout fans, and so on.


    Well, you know what, Helmut? I did not claim that you should have learned
    or were likely to learn anything about any of that, so I'm not sure what
    your point is. If you meant to dispute my contention that one is likely to
    learn something about hardware by learning an OS, then your argument is
    fallacious.

    --
    Old Man

    "Swagger isn't courage." Lee Iacocca

  10. Re: [OT] FAQ Mod Quotes -- (updated: Sweetmorn, the 67th day of Bureaucracy in the YOLD 3171)

    Old Man says:
    >Realto Margarino wrote:


    >>>> The only thing you learn about slackware, is slackware. And
    >>>> knowing slackware does not mean that you know more about your
    >>>> computer.


    >> You won't learn any more about your hardware using slackware than
    >> you will using any other OS.


    >Maybe, but what you said was, "The only thing you learn about
    >slackware, is slackware. And knowing slackware does not mean that
    >you know more about your computer."


    That's right. Knowing slackware does not mean that you know more
    about your computer than if, for example, you know windows.

    Obviously you have reading problems.

    cordially, as always,

    rm

  11. Re: [OT] FAQ Mod Quotes -- (updated: Sweetmorn, the 67th day of Bureaucracy in the YOLD 3171)

    Old Man says:
    >Helmut Hullen wrote:


    >> I have installed many packets in the last 12 years, I have compiled many
    >> packets too.
    >> I have learned nothing about the keyboard in this way, nothing about
    >> PCBs, nothing about multilayers, nothing avout fans, and so on.


    >Well, you know what, Helmut? I did not claim that you should have learned
    >or were likely to learn anything about any of that, so I'm not sure what
    >your point is. If you meant to dispute my contention that one is likely to
    >learn something about hardware by learning an OS, then your argument is
    >fallacious.


    The issue is whether you learn more about your hardware using
    slackware than any other os. And you don't. And since you don't,
    you have lost the argument. Again.

    Now bugger off.

    cordially, as always,

    rm

  12. Re: [OT] FAQ Mod Quotes -- (updated: Sweetmorn, the 67th day of Bureaucracy in the YOLD 3171)

    Realto Margarino wrote:

    > The issue is whether you learn more about your hardware using
    > slackware than any other os. And you don't. And since you don't,
    > you have lost the argument. Again.


    Of course. Mission accomplished.

    > Now bugger off.


    No.

    /dev/rob0 points out that (some, unspecified) other distributions
    provide "hand-holding" admin tools that are (generally) not found in
    Slackware. Because of this: 1) Slackware requires more "hands-on"
    involvement of the user and requires the user to have or develop more
    knowledge; and, 2) a user who does not care to develop the requisite
    knowledge would be happier with one of those other distributions.

    You would like to support the second conclusion while denying the first.
    Just silly, really, but not surprising.

    --
    Old Man

    "Swagger isn't courage." Lee Iacocca

  13. Re: [OT] FAQ Mod Quotes -- (updated: Sweetmorn, the 67th day of Bureaucracy in the YOLD 3171)

    Old Man says:

    >/dev/rob0 points out that (some, unspecified) other distributions
    >provide "hand-holding" admin tools that are (generally) not found in
    >Slackware. Because of this: 1) Slackware requires more "hands-on"
    >involvement of the user and requires the user to have or develop more
    >knowledge;


    Knowledge of which text files to open and what options to give CLI
    commands is not knowledge about either the hardware or the operating
    system.

    >and, 2) a user who does not care to develop the requisite knowledge
    >would be happier with one of those other distributions.


    But slackware users usually don't even acquire this knowledge. It
    has to be ferreted out of FAQs and man pages, and --help command
    lines. And this "requisite knowledge" is _not_ knowledge about the
    OS. It is knowledge about the outdated shell used to admin the OS.

    Knowing which command to type, how to spell it, and what its options
    are, does not mean that you know anymore about the OS than the guy
    who selects a wizard from a window.

    Your problem is, and it is obvious from this conversation, you are
    foggy about what it is that an operating system really is. The OS
    is not the shell.

    >You would like to support the second conclusion while denying the
    >first. Just silly, really, but not surprising.


    Your "conclusions" are not any part of reality. And your
    rhetorical, "just silly, really, but not surprising" is a
    sophomorish attempt to cover your lack of understanding.

    You simply don't know what an operating system is. Bash is not the
    OS and by defending bash you are not defending linux as your zealot
    mindset demands.

    cordially, as always,

    rm

+ Reply to Thread