Basic Sound Configuration - Slackware

This is a discussion on Basic Sound Configuration - Slackware ; Tom N says: >Hey Ron, Hey, dip****? Bugger off. >> Should be. Cant answer definitely because of the nature of gateway >> products at that time. When I encounter a situation where I have no >> manual I have to ...

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Thread: Basic Sound Configuration

  1. Re: Basic Sound Configuration -postscript -postscript

    Tom N says:

    >Hey Ron,


    Hey, dip****? Bugger off.

    >> Should be. Cant answer definitely because of the nature of gateway
    >> products at that time. When I encounter a situation where I have no
    >> manual I have to feel my way along. If I could look at the mobo I could
    >> tell you in 10 seconds


    >Wish I had a digital camera....


    Smoochie koo!

    >...


    Smoochie koo!

    >Rats! So it is. I'll fix that.


    Smoochie koo!

    >Plain old locate must still be around.


    Smoochie koo!

    >Exactly! Thanks for putting it in perspective.


    Smoochie, smoochie, smoochie koo!

    FOAD

    cordially, as always,

    rm

  2. Re: Basic Sound Configuration -postscript -postscript

    Tom N says:

    >> 1) Just get the damn cable and try it out.


    >> 2) Pay someone to do it


    >Okay.


    Smoochie koo!

    >Maybe if he had Windows? (bad joke)


    Smoochie koo!

    >Yeh. I follow. I'll get a cable and try it, being careful
    >to follow your instructions in the other post.


    Smoochie, smoochie, smoochie koo!

    >Thanks a lot, Ron,


    Smoochie koo!

    cordially, as always,

    rm

  3. Re: OT Re: Music and Paranoia was: CDRW reading (was: Basic Sound Configuration.*

    Tom N says:

    >That's a bit harsh. I realize that you meant well, and I thank
    >you for that.


    Smoochie koo!

    >I hope you'll accept my apology and suffer my ramblings,
    >Mark.


    Smoochie, smoochie, smoochie koo!

    cordially, as always,

    rm

  4. Re: OT Re: Music and Paranoia was: CDRW reading (was: Basic Sound Configuration.*

    Tom N says:

    >Hello Sylvain.


    Smoochie koo!

    >(That's a very interesting and poetical name. Must mean something like
    >"man of the forest".)


    Oooooooohhhhhhh!!!!!!!!

    Smoochie, smoochie, koooooooooooooooooooo!!!!!!

    Will somebody please pull the trigger? Or at least flush the damned
    thing...

    cordially, as always,

    rm

  5. Re: Basic Sound Configuration -postscript -postscript

    Tom N says:

    >For which I thank you. You laid the groundwork here.


    Smoochie koo!

    >And your solution would have most likely worked...


    Smoochie, smoochie, koo!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    >I _have_ followed your advice and copied /etc, gzipped, to some
    >floppies.


    Smoochie koo!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    When is somebody going to install some shoe scrapers?

    cordially, as always,

    rm

  6. Re: OT Re: Music and Paranoia was: CDRW reading (was: Basic Sound Configuration.*

    Mark South says:
    >On Fri, 23 Nov 2007 20:12:31 -0600, Dan C wrote:
    >> On Sat, 24 Nov 2007 02:07:16 +0100, Tom N wrote:


    Smoochie koo!

    >> The name is "Sylvain", not "Sylvan", doofus.


    >And the french pronunciation of "Sylvain" (modulo the nasal n) is
    >very close to the english pronunciation of "Sylvan", which is from
    >the latin word for a wood.


    Nonetheless, Sylvan and Sylvain are two different names.

    Bugger off.

    cordially, as always,

    rm

  7. Re: OT Re: Music and Paranoia was: CDRW reading (was: Basic Sound Configuration.*

    On Sat, 24 Nov 2007 18:11:43 +0100, Mark South wrote:

    >>> And the french pronunciation of "Sylvain" (modulo the nasal n) is very
    >>> close to the english pronunciation of "Sylvan", which is from the latin
    >>> word for a wood.


    >> Well, isn't that nice. Quite irrelevant though, when talking about
    >> looking words up in a dictionary. The discussion was about the *meaning*
    >> of a word, not it's *pronunciation*.


    > When words move across languages, they tend to keep their pronunciation
    > and change their orthography. So not at all irrelevant to your
    > original objection.


    Wrong. It's quite irrelevant, due to "Sylvain" and "Sylvan" being two
    different names. Who says they "moved across languages", anyway? They're
    two different names, and my point is correct.

    --
    "Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".


  8. Re: OT Re: Music and Paranoia was: CDRW reading (was: Basic Sound Configuration.*

    Tom N wrote:

    > I think that Microsoft builds security holes into their operating
    > systems so that _they_ can access them without the 'owner' being aware
    > of it, and therefore _other_people_ can use those same holes.


    You're attributing more credit to them than I would. I have no
    delusions that the folks at Microsoft would come up with a way to do
    that. I believe the security problems tend to be caused by bad
    programming, perhaps due at least in part to excessive pressure imposed
    by an overly aggressive marketing department.

    > They can't get rid of the vulnerable software because they'd have to
    > get rid of Windows.


    Of course, but that's actually quite easy to do, as people are finally
    starting to discover.

    > Sorry. I'm too paranoid to compile and run that.


    Well, it *is* right there in the open for you to examine and understand,
    and it's a simple enough program that it isn't that difficult to
    understand ... (I also provided the output, of course, so it's no big
    deal ...)

    --
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Sylvain Robitaille syl@alcor.concordia.ca

    Systems and Network analyst Concordia University
    Instructional & Information Technology Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

  9. Re: OT Re: Music and Paranoia was: CDRW reading (was: Basic Sound Configuration.*

    On 2007-11-25, Sylvain Robitaille wrote:
    > Tom N wrote:
    >
    >> I think that Microsoft builds security holes into their operating
    >> systems so that _they_ can access them without the 'owner' being aware
    >> of it, and therefore _other_people_ can use those same holes.

    >
    > You're attributing more credit to them than I would. I have no
    > delusions that the folks at Microsoft would come up with a way to do
    > that. I believe the security problems tend to be caused by bad
    > programming, perhaps due at least in part to excessive pressure imposed
    > by an overly aggressive marketing department.
    >
    >> They can't get rid of the vulnerable software because they'd have to
    >> get rid of Windows.

    >
    > Of course, but that's actually quite easy to do, as people are finally
    > starting to discover.


    But it isn't. The pressure to use Windows is intense. At the largest
    local computer place, the only one with a decent inventory of parts
    and peripherals, if they know that you run Linux they'll give you
    service so bad that it is insulting and they are happy to see you
    go away.

    I have a friend who uses Earthlink. She says that if you call their
    tech support line and choose the option for "other operating systems"
    (mac and windows being the two other choices) they tell you that they
    don't support Linux. They won't explain why or just what "other operating
    system" they _do_ support, but just repeat, by rote, "we don't support
    Linux".

    The vast majority of schools at every level, public libraries and
    other government agencies and
    businesses use Windows and sometimes that radical Mac. If the subject
    of Linux comes up all the Windows experts are just contemptuous.

    It's anything but easy to even contemplate using Linux in an
    environment like that.

    >
    >> Sorry. I'm too paranoid to compile and run that.

    >
    > Well, it *is* right there in the open for you to examine and understand,
    > and it's a simple enough program that it isn't that difficult to
    > understand ... (I also provided the output, of course, so it's no big
    > deal ...)
    >


    Believe me, Sylvain, I trust you so completely that I don't need to run
    the program to check the results that you posted. I believe you.

    Pretty funny, actually. And a little scary. But it keeps things in perspective.
    It's just a dumb machine.

    Tom

    --
    simpleman.s43
    That would be at gee male


  10. Re: OT Re: Music and Paranoia was: CDRW reading (was: Basic SoundConfiguration.*

    On Sat, 24 Nov 2007 17:18:29 -0600, Dan C wrote:

    > On Sat, 24 Nov 2007 18:11:43 +0100, Mark South wrote:
    >
    >>>> And the french pronunciation of "Sylvain" (modulo the nasal n) is very
    >>>> close to the english pronunciation of "Sylvan", which is from the latin
    >>>> word for a wood.

    >
    >>> Well, isn't that nice. Quite irrelevant though, when talking about
    >>> looking words up in a dictionary. The discussion was about the *meaning*
    >>> of a word, not it's *pronunciation*.

    >
    >> When words move across languages, they tend to keep their pronunciation
    >> and change their orthography. So not at all irrelevant to your
    >> original objection.

    >
    > Wrong. It's quite irrelevant, due to "Sylvain" and "Sylvan" being two
    > different names. Who says they "moved across languages", anyway? They're
    > two different names, and my point is correct.


    Depends. Is "Ivan" the same name as "John" or not? They aren't spelled
    the same or pronounced the same, but they have the same meaning and
    origin, which is where the question about Sylvain's name came from.

    Right or wrong though, we have probably drifted too far off topic, even if
    Sylvain does turn out to live in the woods.

  11. Re: OT Re: Music and Paranoia was: CDRW reading (was: Basic Sound Configuration.*

    Tom N wrote:

    > But it isn't. The pressure to use Windows is intense. ...


    Odd ... I don't seem to suffer from that much pressure ...

    > At the largest local computer place, ... if they know that you run
    > Linux they'll give you service so bad that it is insulting and they
    > are happy to see you go away.


    Find out what you need to know to make a purchasing decision, preferably
    online before making a purchasing decision. It's not like the kids
    working at the local computer store know more about what you need than
    you already do or can find out online.

    "Do you have a model 8 whizbanger?" is all you need to know from them.
    If they ask you what kind of system you're buying it for, give them
    perhaps the hardware details, or give them a simple challenge: "Why does
    it matter?" More often than not, it won't matter anyway, and in those
    cases where it does, you'll already know that the "model 8" works fine
    in Linux, and that's why you're asking for it.

    > I have a friend who uses Earthlink. She says that if you call their
    > tech support line and choose the option for "other operating systems"
    > ... they tell you that they don't support Linux. ...


    Why is she still paying for their service? Realistically, why would it
    even matter to the service provider what OS the client is using?

    When a national ISP effectively refused to troubleshoot (ADSL) connection
    problems I was having (some years ago) because I wasn't using one of their
    supported OSes, (ISP: "we don't support Linux." me: "I'm not asking for
    support with Linux, I'm asking you to support the network connection
    I'm paying you for." ISP: ), I moved on to a different ISP,
    got much better service (with features that the big national ISP only
    offers at a premium price for their "business" customers) for a lower
    price, and have not had to deal with frequent connectivity issues.

    > The vast majority of schools at every level, public libraries and
    > other government agencies and businesses use Windows and sometimes
    > that radical Mac.


    What does that have to do with you, or anyone you can influence?

    Look out for the "schools" stat: the vast majority of schools at every
    level are publically (under)funded and always looking for ways to improve
    the "bang-for-buck" value of purchases and donations. The presence of
    Linux in these institutions (and similarly under-funded ones) is
    steadily growing and there's no reason to believe that trend will stop.

    In some cases, the public institutions need to resort to seeking
    corporate sponsorship to cover the costs of providing computer labs (or
    otherwise accessible workstations for their populations). That tends to
    skew the stats more than a little, of course.

    > If the subject of Linux comes up all the Windows experts are just
    > contemptuous.


    "Windows experts" is a bit of an oxy-moron. ... How many of these
    so-called "experts" do you honestly believe have any idea what changes
    occur on their systems when they click on a particular radio-button, or
    why they're forced to reboot for practically every change. How many of
    them even know where to look?

    More importantly, how many of these folks would be confident they could
    get their system back to exactly the state it was in (modulo OS patches)
    at the time they purchased it (or originally installed the OS, if they
    didn't purchase it pre-installed), after a year of use, without
    resorting to re-installing the OS?

    > It's anything but easy to even contemplate using Linux in an
    > environment like that.


    Not really. You simply need to make the decision that you're going to,
    regardless of whether others are helping or making it difficult. I've
    had people send me Word documents for input (or for evaluation). In
    those cases, I've sent the edits back as an OpenOffice document (which
    in at least one case, I was told could not be read with the version of
    Word the other was using). I usually only have to do that once before I
    start receiving .pdf (or plain text) files instead. :-)

    --
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Sylvain Robitaille syl@alcor.concordia.ca

    Systems and Network analyst Concordia University
    Instructional & Information Technology Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

  12. Re: OT Re: Music and Paranoia was: CDRW reading (was: Basic Sound Configuration.*

    On 2007-11-26, Sylvain Robitaille wrote:
    > Tom N wrote:
    >
    >> But it isn't. The pressure to use Windows is intense. ...

    >
    > Odd ... I don't seem to suffer from that much pressure ...


    You don't live in the environment that I was referring to.

    And you have no experience in it, obviously.

    >> At the largest local computer place, ... if they know that you run
    >> Linux they'll give you service so bad that it is insulting and they
    >> are happy to see you go away.

    >
    > Find out what you need to know to make a purchasing decision, preferably
    > online before making a purchasing decision. It's not like the kids
    > working at the local computer store know more about what you need than
    > you already do or can find out online.
    >
    > "Do you have a model 8 whizbanger?" is all you need to know from them.
    > If they ask you what kind of system you're buying it for, give them
    > perhaps the hardware details, or give them a simple challenge: "Why does
    > it matter?" More often than not, it won't matter anyway, and in those
    > cases where it does, you'll already know that the "model 8" works fine
    > in Linux, and that's why you're asking for it.


    I can't even go in that store anymore. There's no point. They won't
    serve me because they know I run Linux.

    So I have a friend pick stuff up for me.

    >> I have a friend who uses Earthlink. She says that if you call their
    >> tech support line and choose the option for "other operating systems"
    >> ... they tell you that they don't support Linux. ...

    >
    > Why is she still paying for their service?


    Because they do a good job of providing a connection to the internet
    for her. She doesn't need technical support from them.
    She was just curious.

    > Realistically, why would it
    > even matter to the service provider what OS the client is using?


    Pressure from a megacorporation like M$ can be pretty terrible.

    Scores of milions of people are in invested in their success, which
    means growth, one way or another.

    That's basic economic politics.

    > When a national ISP effectively refused to troubleshoot (ADSL) connection
    > problems I was having (some years ago) because I wasn't using one of their
    > supported OSes, (ISP: "we don't support Linux." me: "I'm not asking for
    > support with Linux, I'm asking you to support the network connection
    > I'm paying you for." ISP: ), I moved on to a different ISP,
    > got much better service (with features that the big national ISP only
    > offers at a premium price for their "business" customers) for a lower
    > price, and have not had to deal with frequent connectivity issues.


    Sure.

    >
    >> The vast majority of schools at every level, public libraries and
    >> other government agencies and businesses use Windows and sometimes
    >> that radical Mac.

    >
    > What does that have to do with you, or anyone you can influence?


    Not my point.

    > Look out for the "schools" stat: the vast majority of schools at every
    > level are publically (under)funded and always looking for ways to improve
    > the "bang-for-buck" value of purchases and donations. The presence of
    > Linux in these institutions (and similarly under-funded ones) is
    > steadily growing and there's no reason to believe that trend will stop.


    Unfortunately, this is largely because some Linux distributions are
    becoming more and more like Windows all the time.

    There isn't much sign of that anywhere around here, that's for sure.

    > In some cases, the public institutions need to resort to seeking
    > corporate sponsorship to cover the costs of providing computer labs (or
    > otherwise accessible workstations for their populations). That tends to
    > skew the stats more than a little, of course.


    Sure. But I'm not talking about stats. I am talking about an environment
    that I have personal experience in.

    >> If the subject of Linux comes up all the Windows experts are just
    >> contemptuous.

    >
    > "Windows experts" is a bit of an oxy-moron. ... How many of these
    > so-called "experts" do you honestly believe have any idea what changes
    > occur on their systems when they click on a particular radio-button, or
    > why they're forced to reboot for practically every change. How many of
    > them even know where to look?
    >


    Again, that isn't my point: People _think_ they are experts, which they
    are in comparison to the average user, and they take their opinions
    seriously.

    > More importantly, how many of these folks would be confident they could
    > get their system back to exactly the state it was in (modulo OS patches)
    > at the time they purchased it (or originally installed the OS, if they
    > didn't purchase it pre-installed), after a year of use, without
    > resorting to re-installing the OS?
    >
    >> It's anything but easy to even contemplate using Linux in an
    >> environment like that.

    >
    > Not really.


    Yes really.


    Tom

















  13. Re: OT Re: Music and Paranoia was: CDRW reading (was: Basic Sound Configuration.*

    On Mon, 26 Nov 2007 08:50:36 +0100, Tom N wrote:

    > I can't even go in that store anymore. There's no point. They won't
    > serve me because they know I run Linux.


    You're saying that they won't "serve you"? What does that mean? You
    can't go in there, pick up an item from a shelf, go to the checkout
    register, pay for it, and leave? They won't sell you anything?

    I'll call bull**** on that one.


    --
    "Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".


  14. Re: OT Re: Music and Paranoia was: CDRW reading (was: Basic Sound Configuration.*

    On Mon, 26 Nov 2007 09:30:05 +0100, Tom N wrote:

    and wrote...and wrote

    *plink* (sound of little turd hitting the bowl)


  15. Re: OT Re: Music and Paranoia was: CDRW reading (was: Basic Sound Configuration.*

    -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    Hash: SHA1

    On 2007-11-25, Sylvain Robitaille wrote:
    >> I think that Microsoft builds security holes into their operating
    >> systems so that _they_ can access them without the 'owner' being aware
    >> of it, and therefore _other_people_ can use those same holes.

    >
    > You're attributing more credit to them than I would. I have no
    > delusions that the folks at Microsoft would come up with a way to do
    > that. I believe the security problems tend to be caused by bad
    > programming, perhaps due at least in part to excessive pressure imposed
    > by an overly aggressive marketing department.


    There's any number of reasons for security problems in Windows. A far
    from complete list follows:

    1- Overly aggressive marketing
    2- Improbable timetables
    3- Backwards compatability with decrepit APIs
    4- Right hand don't know what the left hand's doing

    Those four right there are IMHO enough to explain away 90% of the bugs
    in Windows.

    - --
    It is better to hear the rebuke of the wise,
    Than for a man to hear the song of fools.
    Ecclesiastes 7:5
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  16. Re: OT Re: Music and Paranoia was: CDRW reading (was: Basic Sound Configuration.*

    In
    Sylvain Robitaille writes:

    >Can you trust a compiler that produces an incorrect
    >result for "i = 2; n = -1 * abs(i - 1);"?


    Can you trust any compiler at all?

    http://cm.bell-labs.com/who/ken/trust.html

    - Steven
    __________________________________________________ ______________________
    Steven Winikoff |
    Concordia University | "As far as we know, our computer has
    Montreal, QC, Canada | never had an undetected error."
    smw@alcor.concordia.ca |
    http://alcor.concordia.ca/~smw | - Weisert

  17. Re: OT Re: Music and Paranoia was: CDRW reading (was: Basic SoundConfiguration.*

    On Fri, 30 Nov 2007 23:34:26 +0000, Steven Winikoff wrote:

    > In Sylvain Robitaille
    > writes:
    >
    >>Can you trust a compiler that produces an incorrect result for "i = 2; n
    >>= -1 * abs(i - 1);"?

    >
    > Can you trust any compiler at all?
    >
    > http://cm.bell-labs.com/who/ken/trust.html


    That paper was clearly written by a mean troll who knows nothing at all
    about technical matters and merely wants us all to be unreasonably
    paranoid.

    Or maybe not....

  18. Re: OT Re: Music and Paranoia was: CDRW reading (was: Basic Sound Configuration.*

    Steven Winikoff wrote:

    > Can you trust any compiler at all?


    That was my point, really, but I used a known error condition in a
    compiler most people who read this newsgroup are likely to use, as an
    example to underline the point ... :-)

    Can you trust an printable-characters sub-routine that ... ah never
    mind! ;-)

    --
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Sylvain Robitaille syl@alcor.concordia.ca

    Systems and Network analyst Concordia University
    Instructional & Information Technology Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

  19. Re: OT Re: Music and Paranoia was: CDRW reading (was: Basic Sound Configuration.*

    In
    Sylvain Robitaille writes:

    >Can you trust an printable-characters sub-routine that ...


    That whole episode was rather unprintable, actually. -)

    >ah never mind! ;-)


    Yes, let's. :-)

    - Steven
    __________________________________________________ ______________________
    Steven Winikoff | "The most exciting phrase to hear in
    Concordia University | science, the one that heralds new
    Montreal, QC, Canada | discoveries, is not "Eureka!" (I found
    smw@alcor.concordia.ca | it!), but "That's funny..."
    http://alcor.concordia.ca/~smw | - Isaac Asimov

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