Basic Sound Configuration - Slackware

This is a discussion on Basic Sound Configuration - Slackware ; Tom N says: >Still baffled and still reading and experimenting. We all wait with bated breath... >alsamixer says that it is turned to mono output (farthest right on >the display) Shouldn't you be using amixer instead of alsamixer? Isn't the ...

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Thread: Basic Sound Configuration

  1. Re: Basic Sound Configuration -postscript -postscript -update

    Tom N says:

    >Still baffled and still reading and experimenting.


    We all wait with bated breath...

    >alsamixer says that it is turned to mono output (farthest right on
    >the display)


    Shouldn't you be using amixer instead of alsamixer? Isn't the
    latter a little too guish for you? Colours and bars and such?

    >Looks like this:


    Nobody cares.

    cordially, as always,

    rm

  2. Re: Basic Sound Configuration -postscript -postscript

    On Sat, 17 Nov 2007 11:47:29 +0100, Tom N wrote:

    > On 2007-11-17, loki harfagr wrote:
    >> On Sat, 17 Nov 2007 04:17:04 +0100, Tom N wrote:
    >>
    >>>> So for Alsa you need snd-intel8x0 to load. Does this agree with what
    >>>> alsaconf did to your /etc/modprobe.conf file ?
    >>>>
    >>>> That ought to keep you busy :-)
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>> I've been busier than a one-legged man at an ass kicking contest :-)
    >>>
    >>>

    >> Well, as you now seems to be vey quiet and not busy at all here's some
    >> more stuff to check ;-)

    >
    >
    > You are funnier than George Bush centerfold.


    I don't know this young person :-)


    >> Please give the output of the following commands :
    >>
    >> # aplay -l (this is letter 'el' not the number 1) # aplay -L (this is
    >> capital letter L)
    >>
    >> # amixer
    >> (or amixer -c cardnumber if you happen to have hidden
    >> cards but given your precedent posts I don't think so)

    >
    > Gladly:
    >
    >
    > aplay -l
    > --------
    >
    > **** List of PLAYBACK Hardware Devices **** card 0: I82801AAICH [Intel
    > 82801AA-ICH], device 0: Intel ICH [Intel 82801AA-ICH]
    > Subdevices: 1/1
    > Subdevice #0: subdevice #0

    ....

    OK, as for your amixer settings I'd personnally:
    - cut off the 'External Amplifier'
    - cut off the "Simple mixer control 'Mix',0"
    - lower down the "Simple mixer control 'Capture',0"
    from its "Front *: Capture 13 [87%] [19.50dB] [on]"
    to zero (that would avoid feedback and noise).

    Try running these settings, just in case :-)

    $ amixer -c 0 cset iface=MIXER,name='Master Mono Playback Switch' off
    $ amixer -c 0 cset iface=MIXER,name='Master Mono Playback Volume' 0
    $ amixer -c 0 cset iface=MIXER,name='Master Playback Switch' on
    $ amixer -c 0 cset iface=MIXER,name='Master Playback Volume' 24
    $ amixer -c 0 cset iface=MIXER,name='PCM Playback Switch' on
    $ amixer -c 0 cset iface=MIXER,name='PCM Playback Volume' 24
    $ amixer -c 0 cset iface=MIXER,name='Capture Source' 1,1
    $ amixer -c 0 cset iface=MIXER,name='Capture Volume' 0
    $ amixer -c 0 cset iface=MIXER,name='Capture Switch' off

    And test again just in case that would unblock a funny
    double-bind snag somwhers (afterall that's an Intel card ;D)

    but apart of these I don't see anything absolutely b0rken that
    would block the sound, with or without noize :-)

    Now, please, if the previous tests didn't unlock the boss level
    check these extra-ball files:

    (or whatever name you gave the file or, if none
    of these check the old one:
    # cat /etc/modprobe.conf
    )

    and, if any:
    # cat ~/.asoundrc


  3. Re: Basic Sound Configuration -postscript

    On Fri, 16 Nov 2007 22:40:28 +0000, Ron Gibson wrote:

    > On Fri, 16 Nov 2007 16:23:05 +0000, Charlie Siegrist wrote:
    >
    >> You say you are using "Mickey Mouse" speakers. Do they have their own
    >> amplified power source?

    >
    > Those outputs are made to be amplified "downstream" and are line level.


    Precisely.

    > AFAIK all PC sound outputs are line level. Think about it for a sec. I'm
    > driving two big speakers with a 200W Onkyo amp. Can you imagine the size
    > your sound card would have to be to do that, LOL!


    Some sound cards have onboard power amplification (I think a comparison
    with a 200W power amp is a bit overkill). "Line" output is, I believe,
    -10 to -20dBV, a sound card with a power amp might boost that signal as
    little as ten dB. I don't know the specifics, but these aren't big amps,
    and I'm skeptical about fidelity. But they do exist.


  4. Re: Basic Sound Configuration -postscript -postscript

    On 2007-11-17, loki harfagr wrote:
    > On Sat, 17 Nov 2007 11:47:29 +0100, Tom N wrote:
    >
    >> On 2007-11-17, loki harfagr wrote:
    >>> On Sat, 17 Nov 2007 04:17:04 +0100, Tom N wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>> So for Alsa you need snd-intel8x0 to load. Does this agree with what
    >>>>> alsaconf did to your /etc/modprobe.conf file ?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> That ought to keep you busy :-)
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>> I've been busier than a one-legged man at an ass kicking contest :-)
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>> Well, as you now seems to be vey quiet and not busy at all here's some
    >>> more stuff to check ;-)

    >>
    >>
    >> You are funnier than George Bush centerfold.

    >
    > I don't know this young person :-)
    >
    >
    >>> Please give the output of the following commands :
    >>>
    >>> # aplay -l (this is letter 'el' not the number 1) # aplay -L (this is
    >>> capital letter L)
    >>>
    >>> # amixer
    >>> (or amixer -c cardnumber if you happen to have hidden
    >>> cards but given your precedent posts I don't think so)

    >>
    >> Gladly:
    >>
    >>
    >> aplay -l
    >> --------
    >>
    >> **** List of PLAYBACK Hardware Devices **** card 0: I82801AAICH [Intel
    >> 82801AA-ICH], device 0: Intel ICH [Intel 82801AA-ICH]
    >> Subdevices: 1/1
    >> Subdevice #0: subdevice #0

    > ...
    >
    > OK, as for your amixer settings I'd personnally:
    > - cut off the 'External Amplifier'
    > - cut off the "Simple mixer control 'Mix',0"
    > - lower down the "Simple mixer control 'Capture',0"
    > from its "Front *: Capture 13 [87%] [19.50dB] [on]"
    > to zero (that would avoid feedback and noise).
    >
    > Try running these settings, just in case :-)
    >
    > $ amixer -c 0 cset iface=MIXER,name='Master Mono Playback Switch' off
    > $ amixer -c 0 cset iface=MIXER,name='Master Mono Playback Volume' 0
    > $ amixer -c 0 cset iface=MIXER,name='Master Playback Switch' on
    > $ amixer -c 0 cset iface=MIXER,name='Master Playback Volume' 24
    > $ amixer -c 0 cset iface=MIXER,name='PCM Playback Switch' on
    > $ amixer -c 0 cset iface=MIXER,name='PCM Playback Volume' 24
    > $ amixer -c 0 cset iface=MIXER,name='Capture Source' 1,1
    > $ amixer -c 0 cset iface=MIXER,name='Capture Volume' 0
    > $ amixer -c 0 cset iface=MIXER,name='Capture Switch' off
    >


    Hi Loki,

    I ran those commands (no error messages) and then:

    root@darkstar:~# mpg321 -o alsa -v test.mp3
    High Performance MPEG 1.0/2.0/2.5 Audio Player for Layer 1, 2, and 3.
    Version 0.59q (2002/03/23). Written and copyrights by Joe Drew.
    Uses code from various people. See 'README' for more!
    THIS SOFTWARE COMES WITH ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY! USE AT YOUR OWN RISK!
    Title : You're Still The One Artist: Shania Twain
    Album : Year :
    Comment: Genre : Blues

    Playing MPEG stream from test.mp3 ...
    MPEG 1.0, Layer: III, Freq: 44100, mode: Joint-Stereo, modext: 0, BPF : 2560
    Channels: 2, copyright: No, original: Yes, CRC: No, emphasis: 0.
    Bitrate: 128 Kbits/s, Extension value: 0
    Audio: 1:1 conversion, rate: 44100, encoding: signed 16 bit, channels: 2
    Frame# 8147 [4294967278], Time: 03:32.81 [00:00.46],
    [3:32] Decoding of test.mp3 finished.

    I cut is short with Ctrl-c. Sure looked like it was blasting away,
    but not a peep!


    > And test again just in case that would unblock a funny
    > double-bind snag somwhers (afterall that's an Intel card ;D)
    >
    > but apart of these I don't see anything absolutely b0rken that
    > would block the sound, with or without noize :-)


    Me either. According to everything I've read I should
    have great sound right now.

    >
    > Now, please, if the previous tests didn't unlock the boss level
    > check these extra-ball files:
    >
    > (or whatever name you gave the file or, if none
    > of these check the old one:
    > # cat /etc/modprobe.conf



    # /etc/modprobe.conf (old location for Linux 2.6+ config)
    #
    # The use of this config file is deprecated.
    # Instead, create files in the /etc/modprobe.d/ directory
    # containing modprobe options.
    #
    # For more information, see "man modprobe.conf".

    /etc/modprobe.d has one subdirectory, "sound".
    cat sound

    alias snd-card-0 snd-intel8x0
    alias sound-slot-0 snd-intel8x0

    Just for yuks, here's the output of lsmod:


    Module Size Used by
    ppp_deflate 4736 0
    bsd_comp 5632 0
    ppp_async 8832 0
    crc_ccitt 1920 1 ppp_async
    ppp_generic 21780 3 ppp_deflate,bsd_comp,ppp_async
    slhc 6144 1 ppp_generic
    ipv6 226016 10
    snd_seq_dummy 2692 0
    snd_seq_oss 28032 0
    snd_seq_midi_event 5888 1 snd_seq_oss
    snd_seq 42576 5 snd_seq_dummy,snd_seq_oss,snd_seq_midi_event
    snd_seq_device 6540 3 snd_seq_dummy,snd_seq_oss,snd_seq
    snd_pcm_oss 38432 0
    snd_mixer_oss 13824 1 snd_pcm_oss
    snd_intel8x0 28060 0
    snd_ac97_codec 96292 1 snd_intel8x0
    ac97_bus 2048 1 snd_ac97_codec
    snd_pcm 65160 3 snd_pcm_oss,snd_intel8x0,snd_ac97_codec
    snd_timer 17540 2 snd_seq,snd_pcm
    snd 41956 9 snd_seq_oss,snd_seq,snd_seq_device,snd_pcm_oss,snd _mixer_oss,snd_intel8x0,snd_ac97_codec,snd_pcm,snd _timer
    soundcore 5728 1 snd
    snd_page_alloc 7432 2 snd_intel8x0,snd_pcm
    capability 3336 0
    commoncap 5376 1 capability
    lp 9800 0
    parport_pc 23844 1
    parport 30152 2 lp,parport_pc
    pcspkr 2304 0
    psmouse 34440 0
    intel_agp 21532 1
    agpgart 26928 2 intel_agp


    While the mpeg was "playing", lsof:

    mpg321 1391 root cwd DIR 3,2 4096 586370 /root

    mpg321 1391 root rtd DIR 3,2 4096 2 /

    mpg321 1391 root txt REG 3,2 39156 962620 /usr/bin/mpg321

    mpg321 1391 root DEL REG 0,7 2683 /SYSV0056a4d6

    mpg321 1391 root mem CHR 116,16 374696 /dev/snd/pcmC0D0p

    mpg321 1391 root mem REG 3,2 45552 993684 /lib/libnss_files-2.5.so

    mpg321 1391 root mem REG 3,2 41045 993685 /lib/libnss_nis-2.5.so

    mpg321 1391 root mem REG 3,2 96480 993682 /lib/libnsl-2.5.so

    mpg321 1391 root mem REG 3,2 35494 993683 /lib/libnss_compat-2.5.so

    mpg321 1391 root mem REG 3,2 3397844 586611 /root/test.mp3

    mpg321 1391 root mem REG 3,2 184820 993618 /lib/libm-2.5.so

    mpg321 1391 root mem REG 3,2 789892 895878 /usr/lib/libasound.so.2.0.0

    mpg321 1391 root DEL REG 0,7 2682 /SYSV0056a4d5

    mpg321 1391 root mem REG 3,2 110796 993628 /lib/libpthread-2.5.so

    mpg321 1391 root mem REG 3,2 1528742 993680 /lib/libc-2.5.so

    mpg321 1391 root mem REG 3,2 13506 993681 /lib/libdl-2.5.so

    mpg321 1391 root mem REG 3,2 14644 897114 /usr/lib/libao.so.2.1.3

    mpg321 1391 root mem REG 3,2 77688 895870 /usr/lib/libz.so.1.2.3

    mpg321 1391 root mem REG 3,2 86808 897123 /usr/lib/libmad.so.0.2.1

    mpg321 1391 root mem REG 3,2 61244 897119 /usr/lib/libid3tag.so.0.3.0

    mpg321 1391 root mem REG 3,2 10016 931560 /usr/lib/ao/plugins-2/libalsa09.so

    mpg321 1391 root mem REG 3,2 5908 931558 /usr/lib/ao/plugins-2/liboss.so

    mpg321 1391 root mem REG 3,2 131484 993702 /lib/ld-2.5.so

    mpg321 1391 root 0u CHR 3,0 99496 /dev/ttyp0

    mpg321 1391 root 1u CHR 3,0 99496 /dev/ttyp0

    mpg321 1391 root 2u CHR 3,0 99496 /dev/ttyp0

    mpg321 1391 root 3r REG 3,2 3397844 586611 /root/test.mp3

    mpg321 1391 root 4r CHR 116,33 374641 /dev/snd/timer

    mpg321 1391 root 5u CHR 116,16 374696 /dev/snd/pcmC0D0p


    Wait! There's another option for mpg321 for -o:

    alsa09 - the Advanced Linux Sound Architecture, version 0.9;

    And I see /usr/lib/ao/plugins-2/libalsa09.so above. I'll try it with
    that option.

    ............Nope :-(


    > and, if any:
    > # cat ~/.asoundrc
    >


    No such file.

    Thanks, Loki. I'll keep reading and experimenting.

    Tom



  5. Re: Basic Sound Configuration -postscript -postscript

    On Sat, 17 Nov 2007 20:22:34 +0100, Tom N wrote:

    > root@darkstar:~# mpg321 -o alsa -v test.mp3 High Performance MPEG
    > 1.0/2.0/2.5 Audio Player for Layer 1, 2, and 3. Version 0.59q
    > (2002/03/23). Written and copyrights by Joe Drew. Uses code from various
    > people. See 'README' for more! THIS SOFTWARE COMES WITH ABSOLUTELY NO
    > WARRANTY! USE AT YOUR OWN RISK! Title : You're Still The One
    > Artist: Shania Twain Album : Year :
    > Comment: Genre : Blues


    > Playing MPEG stream from test.mp3 ... MPEG 1.0, Layer: III, Freq: 44100,
    > mode: Joint-Stereo, modext: 0, BPF : 2560 Channels: 2, copyright: No,
    > original: Yes, CRC: No, emphasis: 0. Bitrate: 128 Kbits/s, Extension
    > value: 0 Audio: 1:1 conversion, rate: 44100, encoding: signed 16 bit,
    > channels: 2 Frame# 8147 [4294967278], Time: 03:32.81 [00:00.46], [3:32]
    > Decoding of test.mp3 finished.


    > I cut is short with Ctrl-c. Sure looked like it was blasting away, but not
    > a peep!


    That's good. It looks like you're part way there as it sure appears that
    the file is indeed playing. Now I might start suspecting bad hardware -
    Possibly a defective cable to your speakers.

    Also the sound may still be muted. I had some sort of problem with the
    I810 at first but I just can't remember any details as that's been 2-3
    years ago and I gave that machine to my grand niece.

    Continue with Loki as he appears to have some fresh ideas at this point.
    I'll keep watching.

    --
    Email - rsgibson@verizon.borg
    Replace borg with net


  6. Re: Basic Sound Configuration -postscript -postscript -update

    On Sat, 17 Nov 2007 06:53:35 +0100, Tom N wrote:

    > If it is relevant, I'm only getting 'sound' (scratchy noises when I
    > change
    > the volume on the speaker) from the left speaker, none from the right.
    > Unless I pull the plug halfway out. To me that indicates only one live
    > channel, the left one, from the computer.


    Yes that is really relevant. I'm a HiFi nut and have played electric
    guitar for many years and by far and away the most common problem is the
    dreaded "Bad Cable".

    I'd take those speakers and plug them into a system that the sound is
    known to work - Even a windows machine. Verify that the cable and
    speakers will work NOW even if they worked last week.

    In fact this was going to be my next suggestion anyway.

    --
    Email - rsgibson@verizon.borg
    Replace borg with net


  7. Re: Basic Sound Configuration -postscript -postscript

    On 2007-11-17, Ron Gibson wrote:
    > On Sat, 17 Nov 2007 20:22:34 +0100, Tom N wrote:
    >
    >> root@darkstar:~# mpg321 -o alsa -v test.mp3 High Performance MPEG
    >> 1.0/2.0/2.5 Audio Player for Layer 1, 2, and 3. Version 0.59q
    >> (2002/03/23). Written and copyrights by Joe Drew. Uses code from various
    >> people. See 'README' for more! THIS SOFTWARE COMES WITH ABSOLUTELY NO
    >> WARRANTY! USE AT YOUR OWN RISK! Title : You're Still The One
    >> Artist: Shania Twain Album : Year :
    >> Comment: Genre : Blues

    >
    >> Playing MPEG stream from test.mp3 ... MPEG 1.0, Layer: III, Freq: 44100,
    >> mode: Joint-Stereo, modext: 0, BPF : 2560 Channels: 2, copyright: No,
    >> original: Yes, CRC: No, emphasis: 0. Bitrate: 128 Kbits/s, Extension
    >> value: 0 Audio: 1:1 conversion, rate: 44100, encoding: signed 16 bit,
    >> channels: 2 Frame# 8147 [4294967278], Time: 03:32.81 [00:00.46], [3:32]
    >> Decoding of test.mp3 finished.

    >
    >> I cut is short with Ctrl-c. Sure looked like it was blasting away, but not
    >> a peep!

    >
    > That's good. It looks like you're part way there as it sure appears that
    > the file is indeed playing. Now I might start suspecting bad hardware -
    > Possibly a defective cable to your speakers.
    >
    > Also the sound may still be muted. I had some sort of problem with the
    > I810 at first but I just can't remember any details as that's been 2-3
    > years ago and I gave that machine to my grand niece.



    Maybe it will come back to you. I'll google for it, too.

    >
    > Continue with Loki as he appears to have some fresh ideas at this point.
    > I'll keep watching.
    >


    Thanks Ron,

    Tom


  8. Re: Basic Sound Configuration -postscript -postscript -update

    On 2007-11-17, Ron Gibson wrote:
    > On Sat, 17 Nov 2007 06:53:35 +0100, Tom N wrote:
    >
    >> If it is relevant, I'm only getting 'sound' (scratchy noises when I
    >> change
    >> the volume on the speaker) from the left speaker, none from the right.
    >> Unless I pull the plug halfway out. To me that indicates only one live
    >> channel, the left one, from the computer.

    >
    > Yes that is really relevant. I'm a HiFi nut and have played electric
    > guitar for many years and by far and away the most common problem is the
    > dreaded "Bad Cable".
    >
    > I'd take those speakers and plug them into a system that the sound is
    > known to work - Even a windows machine. Verify that the cable and
    > speakers will work NOW even if they worked last week.
    >
    > In fact this was going to be my next suggestion anyway.
    >


    Okay. If the speaker and cable turn out to be good, then will a new
    sound card be the solution? I have one PCI slot available.

    Tom


  9. Re: Basic Sound Configuration -postscript -postscript

    On Sat, 17 Nov 2007 20:22:34 +0100, Tom N wrote:

    > On 2007-11-17, loki harfagr wrote:
    >> On Sat, 17 Nov 2007 11:47:29 +0100, Tom N wrote:
    >>
    >>> On 2007-11-17, loki harfagr wrote:
    >>>> On Sat, 17 Nov 2007 04:17:04 +0100, Tom N wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>> So for Alsa you need snd-intel8x0 to load. Does this agree with
    >>>>>> what alsaconf did to your /etc/modprobe.conf file ?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> That ought to keep you busy :-)

    ....
    >> iface=MIXER,name='Capture Switch' off
    >>
    >>

    > Hi Loki,
    >
    > I ran those commands (no error messages) and then:
    >
    > root@darkstar:~# mpg321 -o alsa -v test.mp3 High Performance MPEG

    ....
    > Decoding of test.mp3 finished.
    >
    > I cut is short with Ctrl-c. Sure looked like it was blasting away, but
    > not a peep!
    >
    >
    >> And test again just in case that would unblock a funny
    >> double-bind snag somwhers (afterall that's an Intel card ;D)
    >>
    >> but apart of these I don't see anything absolutely b0rken that
    >> would block the sound, with or without noize :-)

    >
    > Me either. According to everything I've read I should have great sound
    > right now.

    ....
    >> and, if any:
    >> # cat ~/.asoundrc
    >>
    >>

    > No such file.


    It's not mandatory for a simple structure I mainly wanted to
    be sure there wasn't a file with b0rken settings in it that
    would have routed the signal to inexistent hardware, I saw it
    happen a few times as remnants from previous installations :-)

    >
    > Thanks, Loki. I'll keep reading and experimenting.
    >


    OK, from what we have now, your tests and your conf files
    (which seem mostly simple and good)
    I'd say there remains only a few possibilities:
    1. hardware trouble
    2. connection problem
    3. another app "stealing" the sound
    4. anything I didn't think about ;-)

    > Tom


    For point 1, if you have an oscilloscope and/or a microamperemeter
    and the knowledge to use it to check the base signal and its variations
    while playing sound you may have an idea.
    A simpler way would be to check with another card, internal or external,
    that would add-up the possibilities to mess-up your configuration though :-)

    For point 2, if that's the connection of your speakers, just test with
    other speakers and/or connectors, a headphones set freshly tested as
    working on another sound prodution unit would be perfect.
    If that's the connectors on your card, test it by tiillating the jacks
    while playing (softly, please) and if you have partial sound you found
    out the problem.
    It could also be that you misjacked in the wrong connector, while
    producing sound change the jack in each connector, sometimes the
    color scheme used by the makers is not exact or using colors too
    funny to be correctly recognized under electric light :-)

    Point 3. Usually the stealer is ARTS (it'll soon be just a bad souvenir)
    and since the emerging of Youpuke and Mayspayss it's often a Jawa or a
    Flush task that's sending promotion toolkit in the great bitbucket.
    check to close every browser and kill instances of '*player*' you may
    find with 'ps faux'.

    Point 4. For that one you'll need a new partner ;-)

    Still, a last thing we didn't try but now I re-read your posts in the thread
    I recalled that at some time you mentioned having seen the PCM device files:

    You can test the "stealing" with, for a winning example:
    bash-3.1# lsof | grep pcmC0D0p
    firefox-b 12836 loki mem CHR 116,16 208811 /dev/snd/pcmC0D0p
    firefox-b 12836 loki 92u CHR 116,16 208811 /dev/snd/pcmC0D0p
    bash-3.1#

    So in this test it's clear that Firefox is using the output, and if I
    close the tab which had the clip (it was "paused") it now gives:
    bash-3.1# lsof | grep pcmC0D0p
    bash-3.1#

    Then, you know two things: your config is OK as you have a PCM device and
    it is now free to be tested.
    You can test your sound withound adding the risks that the config of XMMS or mp3player
    or elswhat would be wrong, just use aplay which will directly use the PCM
    if it is free:

    This will play a continuous sine:
    $ while true; do yes "12345678" | head -n 220 | aplay &>/dev/null ; done

    This will play a kind of octava siren:
    $ while true; do yes "12345678" | head -n 220 | aplay &>/dev/null; yes "12345" | head -n 220 | aplay &>/dev/null ; done

    It will play til the end of time, that's all you need to test the
    connectors and all the rest :-)

    (to stop this sound test use Ctrl-Z then 'kill %1' it'll be easier
    than getting crazy on the Ctrl-C to stop the pile waiting in the dark )

    Good luck!

  10. Re: Basic Sound Configuration -postscript -postscript -update

    On Sun, 18 Nov 2007 00:55:33 +0100, Tom N wrote:

    >> In fact this was going to be my next suggestion anyway.


    > Okay. If the speaker and cable turn out to be good, then will a new sound
    > card be the solution? I have one PCI slot available.


    Could very well be the *easiest* option. As I mentioned the I810 chipset
    had given me a bit of a hassle in the past, but I just can't recall the
    details. Seeing how a PCI audio card can be had for $20-30 bucks it's
    not like it's a big expense.

    I'd hate to do that myself as I refuse to give up on solving this sort
    of task but it's getting to the point where I'd need to have the machine
    on my workbench. However, I also have onboard audio and I never use it
    because as it's been said, the sound is usually not nearly as good as a
    audio card delivers.

    Before I'd toss in the towel on that one I'd google
    (use http://www.google.com/linux) the problem. I did that the other day
    and got a lot of hits.

    Also ask for a suggestion for a well supported card. After installing
    the card be sure to disable the old sound chip in your BIOS.


    --
    Email - rsgibson@verizon.borg
    Replace borg with net


  11. Re: Basic Sound Configuration -postscript -postscript

    On 2007-11-18, loki harfagr wrote:
    > On Sat, 17 Nov 2007 20:22:34 +0100, Tom N wrote:
    > ...


    ....

    >>> and, if any:
    >>> # cat ~/.asoundrc
    >>>
    >>>

    >> No such file.

    >
    > It's not mandatory for a simple structure I mainly wanted to
    > be sure there wasn't a file with b0rken settings in it that
    > would have routed the signal to inexistent hardware, I saw it
    > happen a few times as remnants from previous installations :-)
    >
    >>
    >> Thanks, Loki. I'll keep reading and experimenting.
    >>

    >
    > OK, from what we have now, your tests and your conf files
    > (which seem mostly simple and good)
    > I'd say there remains only a few possibilities:
    > 1. hardware trouble
    > 2. connection problem
    > 3. another app "stealing" the sound
    > 4. anything I didn't think about ;-)
    >


    ....

    >
    > This will play a continuous sine:
    > $ while true; do yes "12345678" | head -n 220 | aplay &>/dev/null ; done


    Well hell! I ran that script and tried the different jacks, and, as you
    suggested above in the part I deleted, and as Ron has been telling me
    all along, it turned out I was using the wrong one!

    Jeesh but I feel stupid.

    And now I know that the Shania Twain song Ron made available on his FTP
    server, "You're Still the One", is not a remake of the old tune by Orleans
    with the same name.

    Both speakers working fine. For low volumes, the quality, and particularly
    the bass, are quite good. Surprisingly so for such tiny speakers.

    They look like the little space vehicle that Dave used in "2001 a Space Odyssey".

    I'd say that I regret all this, but the fact is that I learned a great deal
    about sound on Linux/Slackware and that's a good thing. Plus, these posts
    will be here for others to reference along with the other almost concurrent
    thread on 12.0 sound.

    Many thanks to you, Loki, and Ron, and to notbob and Charlie Siegrist.

    Now, about getting my CDRW to play tunes on my box. :-)

    I'll start a new thread about that.

    Can I use cdparanoia to copy them onto my harddrive and play the files
    from there? Or am I misunderstanding the description in packages.txt?


    Tom




  12. Re: Basic Sound Configuration -postscript -postscript

    >> $ while true; do yes "12345678" | head -n 220 | aplay &>/dev/null ; done
    ......
    >
    > Well hell! I ran that script and tried the different jacks, and, as you
    > suggested above in the part I deleted, and as Ron has been telling me
    > all along, it turned out I was using the wrong one!
    >
    > Jeesh but I feel stupid.
    >


    But then, the last time I tried those other jacks I got nothing while
    the mp3 was "playing". I've gone over every step carefully and it must
    have been the mixer settings, which must have been corrected by Loki's
    list of amixer commands (see this thread).

    I'll be studying them carefully....

    >
    > Tom
    >
    >
    >


  13. Re: Basic Sound Configuration -postscript -postscript

    On Mon, 19 Nov 2007 01:26:52 +0100, Tom N wrote:

    > Jeesh but I feel stupid.


    We've all been there not seeing the forest for the trees.

    > Both speakers working fine. For low volumes, the quality, and
    > particularly the bass, are quite good. Surprisingly so for such tiny
    > speakers.


    > I'd say that I regret all this, but the fact is that I learned a great
    > deal about sound on Linux/Slackware and that's a good thing. Plus, these
    > posts will be here for others to reference along with the other almost
    > concurrent thread on 12.0 sound.


    Now while you're on a roll backup all of /etc, /root, ~/ - Those three
    directories contain about all you need to restore yourself to a "known
    working configuration" as you take on the next task. If I understand
    correctly you've gotten sound going in a VT. Next challenge is sound in
    your X window manager and CDROM sound.

    Most likely you had alsamixer mute a channel you needed. Then you stored
    that with alsactl store. Then you overridden those setting with the
    script.

    You might want to take a look or play with alsamixer some more as
    there's as bit more going on there than immediately meets the eye.

    > Now, about getting my CDRW to play tunes on my box. :-)


    You just need a little cable, a few bucks. BUT, you'll need to know
    where to plug it in on your mobo, goes from CD to mobo receptacle with
    an onboard audio chip. If you're in luck it may be printed on the mobo
    and the socket has a unique configuration. Most CD's have two types of
    line outs, a digital and a analog one.

    It really is a lot easier than this sounds especially if you know where
    the mobo socket is.

    --
    Email - rsgibson@verizon.borg
    Replace borg with net


  14. Re: Basic Sound Configuration -postscript -postscript

    On Mon, 19 Nov 2007 01:26:52 +0100, Tom N wrote:

    > I'd say that I regret all this, but the fact is that I learned a great
    > deal about sound on Linux/Slackware and that's a good thing. Plus, these
    > posts will be here for others to reference along with the other almost
    > concurrent thread on 12.0 sound.


    Oh one more item that in general is good to know. When you play with
    some of these services you may need to retsart the service sometimes.

    Most services are initialized in /etc/rc.d/ : The rc scripts that are
    executable (mc hand here) are the one run on boot.

    For example you will see an rc.alsa script that is executable there.

    Perhaps you already knew this but if not now you do :-)

    --
    Email - rsgibson@verizon.borg
    Replace borg with net


  15. CDRW reading (was: Basic Sound Configuration.*

    On Mon, 19 Nov 2007 01:26:52 +0100, Tom N wrote:

    > They look like the little space vehicle that Dave used in "2001 a Space
    > Odyssey".
    >
    > I'd say that I regret all this, but the fact is that I learned a great
    > deal about sound on Linux/Slackware and that's a good thing. Plus, these
    > posts will be here for others to reference along with the other almost
    > concurrent thread on 12.0 sound.
    >
    > Many thanks to you, Loki, and Ron, and to notbob and Charlie Siegrist.
    >
    > Now, about getting my CDRW to play tunes on my box. :-)
    >
    > I'll start a new thread about that.
    >
    > Can I use cdparanoia to copy them onto my harddrive and play the files
    > from there? Or am I misunderstanding the description in packages.txt?


    No, that's right you can do it that way, there are other options
    I personnally prefer (and I'm sure Joerg will say so if he happens to
    pass by ;-): cdda2wav and cdrdao, you can "tune" cdda2wav to mimick
    cdparanoia (I'll let you find out how in the doc, it's crystal clear)
    or chose other useful settings, and it has better control on hardware
    and data flow.

    If you want to extract tracks:

    $ cdda2wav -B -D /dev/hdc

    Or, extract the 6 first tracks:
    $ cdda2wav -B -D /dev/hdc -t 1+6

    (which would be exactly what the doctor ordered in case
    you're rip'in a phoney CDaudio [like a Cactus-Crippled CD])

    This would allow you to quickly transmute the wav files into
    good lossless Flac format or good lossy ogg vorbis format or
    even to wacky mpeg layer3 variations :-) eg:

    If you want to get a disk image, just use cdrdao, eg:
    $ cdrdao read-toc
    $ cdrdao disk-info --device /dev/hdc
    $ cdrdao read --read-raw --datafile vanWelke.iso --device 1001,0,0 vanWelke.toc

    Note that for the use and choice of what device name and/or
    type to use you'll have to read a few lines in the man pages and
    then experiment with your installation to check what'll suit it
    the best, especially since -- as Ron Gibson noted afore -- it's
    not yet clear if you have fully connected CD hardware or not,
    if the doodah's quite recent I'd say it's OK but YMMV :-)

    Hold on ! At the end of the rainbow there's happiness ;D)

  16. Re: Basic Sound Configuration -postscript -postscript

    Ron Gibson wrote:
    > On Mon, 19 Nov 2007 01:26:52 +0100, Tom N wrote:
    >
    >> Jeesh but I feel stupid.

    >
    > We've all been there not seeing the forest for the trees.


    Amen!

    >> Both speakers working fine. For low volumes, the quality, and
    >> particularly the bass, are quite good. Surprisingly so for such tiny
    >> speakers.

    >
    >> I'd say that I regret all this, but the fact is that I learned a great
    >> deal about sound on Linux/Slackware and that's a good thing. Plus, these
    >> posts will be here for others to reference along with the other almost
    >> concurrent thread on 12.0 sound.

    >
    > Now while you're on a roll backup all of /etc, /root, ~/ - Those three
    > directories contain about all you need to restore yourself to a "known
    > working configuration" as you take on the next task. If I understand
    > correctly you've gotten sound going in a VT. Next challenge is sound in
    > your X window manager and CDROM sound.
    >
    > Most likely you had alsamixer mute a channel you needed. Then you stored
    > that with alsactl store. Then you overridden those setting with the
    > script.
    >
    > You might want to take a look or play with alsamixer some more as
    > there's as bit more going on there than immediately meets the eye.
    >
    >> Now, about getting my CDRW to play tunes on my box. :-)

    >
    > You just need a little cable, a few bucks. BUT, you'll need to know
    > where to plug it in on your mobo, goes from CD to mobo receptacle with
    > an onboard audio chip. If you're in luck it may be printed on the mobo
    > and the socket has a unique configuration. Most CD's have two types of
    > line outs, a digital and a analog one.
    >
    > It really is a lot easier than this sounds especially if you know where
    > the mobo socket is.


    A bit of dispute with Ron, since my MB is a few years old I didn't know
    there was a socket for any cable from your CD or DVD for sound purposes. But
    on the SB Live card there are three inputs for a CD cable to plug into. Plug
    a cable into the CD and the sound card. That's if you have an old MB.

    Works for me!
    --
    Bud

  17. Re: Basic Sound Configuration -postscript -postscript

    Bud says:

    >A bit of dispute with Ron, since my MB is a few years old I didn't
    >know there was a socket for any cable from your CD or DVD for sound
    >purposes. But on the SB Live card there are three inputs for a CD
    >cable to plug into. Plug a cable into the CD and the sound card.
    >That's if you have an old MB.


    Let's just let this newbie dangle out there with his lips reaching,
    frantically, for any ass to kiss. It's too pathetic watching this
    clown attempt to ingratiate himself with some of the lonely ****s
    who peruse this newsgroup with vicarious intentions.

    Watching him and The Coward suck each other off in public was
    sickening, but who could turn away? It was almost as touching as
    watching Virgin Dan C and Floyd, of polar bear fame, discuss the
    meaning of life.

    cordially, as always,

    rm

  18. Re: Basic Sound Configuration -postscript -postscript

    On Mon, 19 Nov 2007 21:31:44 +0000, Bud wrote:

    >> It really is a lot easier than this sounds especially if you know
    >> where the mobo socket is.


    > A bit of dispute with Ron, since my MB is a few years old I didn't know
    > there was a socket for any cable from your CD or DVD for sound purposes.
    > But on the SB Live card there are three inputs for a CD cable to plug
    > into. Plug a cable into the CD and the sound card. That's if you have an
    > old MB.


    Yeah it can be a PITA finding the right socket. If you know what model
    Motherboard it is (if you don't have the manual) you can go to the
    makers site and download the manual. The better companies keep manuals
    archived forever - I never liked Intel mobos too much until I recently
    bought one and saw how good they are about archiving info.

    I had a surprise myself. I was running W98SE until about a year ago
    (spend maybe an hour a week in windows) and now have W2K. I didn't notice
    I was getting no sound from by CDRW but was getting it from my DVDRW
    under windows until the other day.

    Now I always thought those connectors weren't necessary with Windows but
    sure enough - Connected a cable and sound out is now fine for both units.

    Go figure...

    --
    Email - rsgibson@verizon.borg
    Replace borg with net


  19. Re: Basic Sound Configuration -postscript -postscript

    On 2007-11-19, Ron Gibson wrote:
    > On Mon, 19 Nov 2007 01:26:52 +0100, Tom N wrote:
    >
    >> Jeesh but I feel stupid.

    >
    > We've all been there not seeing the forest for the trees.


    Kind of you to say, Ron.

    >> Both speakers working fine. For low volumes, the quality, and
    >> particularly the bass, are quite good. Surprisingly so for such tiny
    >> speakers.

    >
    >> I'd say that I regret all this, but the fact is that I learned a great
    >> deal about sound on Linux/Slackware and that's a good thing. Plus, these
    >> posts will be here for others to reference along with the other almost
    >> concurrent thread on 12.0 sound.

    >
    > Now while you're on a roll backup all of /etc, /root, ~/ - Those three
    > directories contain about all you need to restore yourself to a "known
    > working configuration" as you take on the next task.


    I haven't tackled burning CDs yet. Have no idea what's involved there.
    Looks like I need this package:

    PACKAGE NAME: cdrtools-2.01.01a23-i486-1.tgz
    PACKAGE LOCATION: ./slackware/ap
    PACKAGE SIZE (compressed): 1303 K
    PACKAGE SIZE (uncompressed): 3140 K
    PACKAGE DESCRIPTION:
    cdrtools: cdrtools
    cdrtools:
    cdrtools: Tools for mastering and writing compact discs.
    cdrtools:
    cdrtools: cdda2wav -- CD audio sampling utility.
    cdrtools: cdrecord -- burn discs in most ATAPI and SCSI CD-R drives.
    cdrtools: mkisofs -- create ISO9660/HFS/Joliet CD-ROM images.
    cdrtools: mkzftree -- compress a file tree to make a compressed CD-ROM.
    cdrtools:

    But there's probably more involved.

    This is from dmesg:

    hdc: HL-DT-ST GCE-8160B, ATAPI CD/DVD-ROM drive
    hdc: ATAPI 40X CD-ROM CD-R/RW drive, 2048kB Cache, DMA
    Uniform CD-ROM driver Revision: 3.20

    I have a floppy drive and some floppies, but /etc is 6.1M according
    to du -h.

    > If I understand
    > correctly you've gotten sound going in a VT. Next challenge is sound in
    > your X window manager and CDROM sound.


    I'm running slack from a bunch of xterms using the ratpoison window
    manager.

    >
    > Most likely you had alsamixer mute a channel you needed. Then you stored
    > that with alsactl store. Then you overridden those setting with the
    > script.


    That sounds right.

    >
    > You might want to take a look or play with alsamixer some more as
    > there's as bit more going on there than immediately meets the eye.
    >
    >> Now, about getting my CDRW to play tunes on my box. :-)

    >
    > You just need a little cable, a few bucks. BUT, you'll need to know
    > where to plug it in on your mobo, goes from CD to mobo receptacle with
    > an onboard audio chip. If you're in luck it may be printed on the mobo
    > and the socket has a unique configuration. Most CD's have two types of
    > line outs, a digital and a analog one.
    >
    > It really is a lot easier than this sounds especially if you know where
    > the mobo socket is.
    >


    No clue. I searched the Gateway website for information on my computer,
    using google, and there was not a single reference to it there.

    Tom




  20. Re: Basic Sound Configuration -postscript -postscript

    On 2007-11-19, Bud wrote:
    > Ron Gibson wrote:
    >> On Mon, 19 Nov 2007 01:26:52 +0100, Tom N wrote:
    >>
    >>> Jeesh but I feel stupid.

    >>
    >> We've all been there not seeing the forest for the trees.

    >
    > Amen!


    Thanks.

    >
    >>> Both speakers working fine. For low volumes, the quality, and
    >>> particularly the bass, are quite good. Surprisingly so for such tiny
    >>> speakers.

    >>
    >>> I'd say that I regret all this, but the fact is that I learned a great
    >>> deal about sound on Linux/Slackware and that's a good thing. Plus, these
    >>> posts will be here for others to reference along with the other almost
    >>> concurrent thread on 12.0 sound.

    >>
    >> Now while you're on a roll backup all of /etc, /root, ~/ - Those three
    >> directories contain about all you need to restore yourself to a "known
    >> working configuration" as you take on the next task. If I understand
    >> correctly you've gotten sound going in a VT. Next challenge is sound in
    >> your X window manager and CDROM sound.
    >>
    >> Most likely you had alsamixer mute a channel you needed. Then you stored
    >> that with alsactl store. Then you overridden those setting with the
    >> script.
    >>
    >> You might want to take a look or play with alsamixer some more as
    >> there's as bit more going on there than immediately meets the eye.
    >>
    >>> Now, about getting my CDRW to play tunes on my box. :-)

    >>
    >> You just need a little cable, a few bucks. BUT, you'll need to know
    >> where to plug it in on your mobo, goes from CD to mobo receptacle with
    >> an onboard audio chip. If you're in luck it may be printed on the mobo
    >> and the socket has a unique configuration. Most CD's have two types of
    >> line outs, a digital and a analog one.
    >>
    >> It really is a lot easier than this sounds especially if you know where
    >> the mobo socket is.

    >
    > A bit of dispute with Ron, since my MB is a few years old I didn't know
    > there was a socket for any cable from your CD or DVD for sound purposes. But
    > on the SB Live card there are three inputs for a CD cable to plug into. Plug
    > a cable into the CD and the sound card. That's if you have an old MB.
    >
    > Works for me!


    Sure would be simpler if I had a soundcard. But it's built into the
    the motherboard.

    Cheers,

    Tom





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