Mail server - Slackware

This is a discussion on Mail server - Slackware ; Just a general question, about setting up a mail server. What I want to do is have the mail come in to the server (Slack 10.1 headless). I can then filter it, to get out the spam. I have 2 ...

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Thread: Mail server

  1. Mail server

    Just a general question, about setting up a mail server.
    What I want to do is have the mail come in to the server (Slack 10.1
    headless). I can then filter it, to get out the spam. I have 2 PC's &
    1 laptop that I can then access the mail, leaving it on the server for
    say 2 weeks them deleted. There is 1 email account someone@isp.co.uk
    (ie filtered by the someone).
    I don't need anything too fancy & easy to setup.
    I have been using Slack for a few years, so I can find my way around,
    but when I tried to do this a couple of years ago I made a right mess
    of it.
    My question is
    1. Should I stick with 10.1 or upgrade to 12
    2. What software should I install.

    Thanks Lez


  2. Re: Mail server

    On 2007-10-08, Lez wrote:
    > Just a general question, about setting up a mail server.
    > What I want to do is have the mail come in to the server (Slack 10.1
    > headless). I can then filter it, to get out the spam. I have 2 PC's &
    > 1 laptop that I can then access the mail, leaving it on the server for
    > say 2 weeks them deleted. There is 1 email account someone@isp.co.uk
    > (ie filtered by the someone).
    > I don't need anything too fancy & easy to setup.
    > I have been using Slack for a few years, so I can find my way around,
    > but when I tried to do this a couple of years ago I made a right mess
    > of it.
    > My question is
    > 1. Should I stick with 10.1 or upgrade to 12
    > 2. What software should I install.


    Slackware 10 will be fine. I use postfix with spamassassin on my
    Slackware 10 box; configuring the two to work together is fairly
    straightforward and well-documented. I'm sure someone knows how to
    configure sendmail with spamassassin, too, if you prefer not to replace
    your MTA.

    --keith

    --
    kkeller-usenet@wombat.san-francisco.ca.us
    (try just my userid to email me)
    AOLSFAQ=http://www.therockgarden.ca/aolsfaq.txt
    see X- headers for PGP signature information


  3. Re: Mail server

    On Mon, 8 Oct 2007, Lez wrote:

    > 1. Should I stick with 10.1 or upgrade to 12


    10 is fine, as Pat will no doubt support it for a few more years to come
    yet.

    > 2. What software should I install.


    MailScanner www.mailscanner.info
    SpamAssassin cpan -i Mail::SpamAssassin
    (if you dont have cpan use: perl -MCPAN -e 'install Mail::SpamAssassin'
    Then also head over to www.clamav.net for a free virus scanner.

    This works well with Sendmail, Qmail, Exim and Postfix


    --

    Cheers
    Res


  4. Re: Mail server

    On Mon, 08 Oct 2007 14:04:36 -0700, Keith Keller wrote:

    > Slackware 10 will be fine. I use postfix with spamassassin on my
    > Slackware 10 box; configuring the two to work together is fairly
    > straightforward and well-documented. I'm sure someone knows how to
    > configure sendmail with spamassassin, too, if you prefer not to replace
    > your MTA.


    I see you're using postfix, but I'm wondering if anyone is using
    spamassassin with sendmail. I set it up several years ago and I
    found it sort of messy. I had to install about 8 perl modules,
    recompile sendmail, mess with some other stuff I can't remember
    right now. Anyway, I felt it messed with sendmail too much and
    I didn't reinstall it after a few sendmail upgrades. I guess
    I'm asking is it a pretty clean setup nowadays? For someone
    who is kind of neurotic.

    Julien

  5. Re: Mail server

    Julien Mills wrote:
    > On Mon, 08 Oct 2007 14:04:36 -0700, Keith Keller wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Slackware 10 will be fine. I use postfix with spamassassin on my
    >>Slackware 10 box; configuring the two to work together is fairly
    >>straightforward and well-documented. I'm sure someone knows how to
    >>configure sendmail with spamassassin, too, if you prefer not to replace
    >>your MTA.

    >
    >
    > I see you're using postfix, but I'm wondering if anyone is using
    > spamassassin with sendmail. I set it up several years ago and I
    > found it sort of messy. I had to install about 8 perl modules,
    > recompile sendmail, mess with some other stuff I can't remember
    > right now. Anyway, I felt it messed with sendmail too much and
    > I didn't reinstall it after a few sendmail upgrades. I guess
    > I'm asking is it a pretty clean setup nowadays? For someone
    > who is kind of neurotic.
    >
    > Julien


    On my workstation I run ClamAv and SpamAssassin from sendmail's
    local delivery agent (procmail). This can be done without
    any adjustment in sendmails configuration.
    The drawback is that filtering happens during the final
    delivery of the mail; way too late to reject messages you don't
    want. But if you're using POP or IMAP to fetch mail from
    your ISP's server its too lat anyway to reject messages.

    On the inbound mailservers at work I filter during the
    smtp-conversation before the sever accepts responsibilety
    for the message. That way I can simply reject anything
    I don't want (spam, viruses, mail for unknown users)
    and let the sender do the error handling.
    I'm using Clamav and SpamAssassin for the virus and
    spam checking and MimeDefang as the tool between
    sendmail and these two scanners.
    Mimdefang (www.roaringpenguin.com) is a very flexible
    tool if you want to do smart things during smtp
    mail transmission.

    MimeDefang uses sendmail's milter api to communicate
    with sendmail. You don't need to recompile senmail.
    Depending on the functionality you need/want you'll
    still have to install several perl modules.

    Regards,

    Kees.

    --
    Kees Theunissen.

  6. Re: Mail server

    I am sorry I didn't explain myself properly.
    I want my server to simply act as a post box where I can pickup the
    mail, from a laptop pc etc, using an email client. the server is in
    the cupboard upstairs connected to the internet.
    When I said what software should I install, I should have said, what
    software should I use.
    I have tried to understand thing like fetchmail etc. but don't fully
    understand what they do.
    I assume fetchmail brings the mail in, but to where, & what do I need
    to setup next.
    I think the problem is there is so many good programs out there doing
    this job I don't know where to start looking.
    Thanks for the replies, it sounds as if I have to do a bit more
    homework.
    Lez


  7. Re: Mail server

    Lez wrote:
    [mail]
    > I think the problem is there is so many good programs out there doing
    > this job I don't know where to start looking.


    i don't know if anyone has already pointed this out, but back in the days,
    the linux documentation project was all the rage. they have two HOWTOs on
    mail, which i found helpful back when i thought i needed to understand how
    mail worked. (i no longer feel that way. ;-)

    i just checked it out, they're still there, but they haven't been updated
    for a while. still, i reckon most of the info is still valid, so you may
    want to have a look anyway:




    HTH

    --
    Joost Kremers joostkremers@yahoo.com
    Selbst in die Unterwelt dringt durch Spalten Licht
    EN:SiS(9)

  8. Re: Mail server

    On Wed, 10 Oct 2007 17:27:40 +0000, Joost Kremers wrote:

    > Lez wrote:
    > [mail]
    >> I think the problem is there is so many good programs out there doing
    >> this job I don't know where to start looking.

    >
    > i don't know if anyone has already pointed this out, but back in the
    > days, the linux documentation project was all the rage. they have two
    > HOWTOs on mail, which i found helpful back when i thought i needed to
    > understand how mail worked. (i no longer feel that way. ;-)
    >
    > i just checked it out, they're still there, but they haven't been
    > updated for a while. still, i reckon most of the info is still valid, so


    Hmm, just a few days ago, I was bored I guess, and I was looking through
    all the HOWTOs to see the dates. Very few are anywhere near up to date,
    most seem to be from 2000, 2001 or so.

    So what has happened? People are relying on the documentation that comes
    with each program? And, in general, more people have a pretty good idea
    how to do things maybe? Probably it is easier to set up a linux box now
    than is was about 5-6 years ago.

  9. Re: Mail server

    Julien Mills wrote:
    > Hmm, just a few days ago, I was bored I guess, and I was looking through
    > all the HOWTOs to see the dates. Very few are anywhere near up to date,
    > most seem to be from 2000, 2001 or so.


    yes, i noticed that too. i looked at the home page of tldp.org, to see if
    they closed down shop or something. but they still list updates to HOWTOs:
    lists five updates in the past two
    months.

    but there used to be a time that you couldn't go a day in linux-related
    usenet groups without hearing about tldp.org (at least, that's my
    impression). nowadays they're hardly mentioned at all...


    --
    Joost Kremers joostkremers@yahoo.com
    Selbst in die Unterwelt dringt durch Spalten Licht
    EN:SiS(9)

  10. Re: Mail server

    Joost Kremers says:
    >Julien Mills wrote:
    >> Hmm, just a few days ago, I was bored I guess, and I was looking through
    >> all the HOWTOs to see the dates. Very few are anywhere near up to date,
    >> most seem to be from 2000, 2001 or so.


    >yes, i noticed that too. i looked at the home page of tldp.org, to see if
    >they closed down shop or something. but they still list updates to HOWTOs:
    > lists five updates in the past two
    >months.


    Slackware hasn't had a new user since 2001, so what difference does
    it make?

    cordially, as always,

    rm

  11. Re: Mail server

    Ok
    I have read various docs about email & am starting to understand how
    complex it can be.
    I have fetchmail, dovecot, sendmail & postfix installed on my server.
    I know I don't need all of these, I just need to choose which ones to
    use.
    My server is set up as shuttle.mygroup on a 192.168.0 network, all is
    running OK.
    I have a couple of questions.
    1. Does the server name need changing & if so to what, I am only
    looking to pick mail up from my ISP & hold it for local delivery.
    2. What of the above programs should I use (easy to set up I hope)

    I know I may sound a little stupid but this is all new to me, I have
    alway pulled my email from my ISP.
    Thanks for you help
    Lez


  12. Re: Mail server

    Lez wrote:
    > Ok
    > I have read various docs about email & am starting to understand how
    > complex it can be.
    > I have fetchmail, dovecot, sendmail & postfix installed on my server.
    > I know I don't need all of these, I just need to choose which ones to
    > use.
    > My server is set up as shuttle.mygroup on a 192.168.0 network, all is
    > running OK.
    > I have a couple of questions.
    > 1. Does the server name need changing & if so to what, I am only
    > looking to pick mail up from my ISP & hold it for local delivery.


    no, that shouldn't be necessary.

    > 2. What of the above programs should I use (easy to set up I hope)


    fetchmail (or getmail, which some deem better) to get your mail from your
    isp to your server.

    dovecot to make the mail available to the clients on your network.

    sendmail or postfix to accept mail from your clients and send it on to your
    isp.

    as an alternative to sendmail or postfix, you can also have your mail
    program connect to your isp directly. in that case, you can simply
    configure your email program with the smtp server of your isp, or use
    someting like msmtp on your client machines to do that.

    > I know I may sound a little stupid but this is all new to me, I have
    > alway pulled my email from my ISP.


    what is the reason why you don't want to continue to do this?


    --
    Joost Kremers joostkremers@yahoo.com
    Selbst in die Unterwelt dringt durch Spalten Licht
    EN:SiS(9)

  13. Re: Mail server


    Joost Kremers wrote:


    > fetchmail (or getmail, which some deem better) to get your mail from your
    > isp to your server.
    >
    > dovecot to make the mail available to the clients on your network.
    >
    > sendmail or postfix to accept mail from your clients and send it on to your
    > isp.
    >
    > as an alternative to sendmail or postfix, you can also have your mail
    > program connect to your isp directly. in that case, you can simply
    > configure your email program with the smtp server of your isp, or use
    > someting like msmtp on your client machines to do that.
    >
    > > I know I may sound a little stupid but this is all new to me, I have
    > > alway pulled my email from my ISP.

    >
    > what is the reason why you don't want to continue to do this?


    Thanks for the reply

    I have 2 PC that get the mail from my ISP, they both leave the mail on
    there.
    One is set to delete the mail if there is more than 600, so the ISP
    has the last 600 emails.
    The trouble is I now get about 200 emails a day (190 Spam 10 for us).
    My ISP will only hold 1000 emails, about 5 days worth, so if we are
    away for a week, the last 2 days emails get bounced!
    Hope you understand all of the above.
    So what I want to do is hold all the emails on my server at home,
    filter them to get out most of the Spam, ready for us to look at them
    at our leisure.

    Lez


  14. Re: Mail server

    Lez wrote:
    >> what is the reason why you don't want to continue to do this?

    >
    > I have 2 PC that get the mail from my ISP, they both leave the mail on
    > there.
    > One is set to delete the mail if there is more than 600, so the ISP
    > has the last 600 emails.
    > The trouble is I now get about 200 emails a day (190 Spam 10 for us).
    > My ISP will only hold 1000 emails, about 5 days worth, so if we are
    > away for a week, the last 2 days emails get bounced!
    > Hope you understand all of the above.
    > So what I want to do is hold all the emails on my server at home,
    > filter them to get out most of the Spam, ready for us to look at them
    > at our leisure.


    yes, that makes perfect sense. then you probably want the simplest, easiest
    solution, not the one where you learn most about running a full-blown mail
    server. ;-)

    in that case, i'd recommend fetchmail/getmail and dovecot on the server,
    and let the email clients connect to the smtp server of your isp directly
    for outgoing mail.

    note that fetchmail and getmail need some way of knowing where to drop the
    mail they receive. fetchmail either needs a mail transer agent (MTA;
    sendmail, postfix, etc) (i.e. sendmail/postfix etc) or a mail delivery
    agent (MDA; procmail, maildrop) to do local delivery. getmail, according to
    the documentation, has the ability to drop mail directly in maildir-style
    mailboxes.

    so the set-up should be:

    1) fetchmail/getmail: gets mail from ISP and hands it to MDA
    (alternatively: to MTA).

    2 a) procmail/maildrop: receives mail from fetchmail/getmail and delivers it
    to local mailboxes.

    b) alternatively: sendmail/postfix.

    3) dovecot: imap/pop3 server to make the mail on the server available to
    local clients.

    4) email clients (MUAs): connect to dovecot to read the mail; connect to
    smtp server of ISP directly to send mail (alternatvely: connect to MTA on
    your local server to send mail).

    personally, i'd forget about using sendmail/postfix, and go with the MDA
    option and direct connections to from mail clients to isp for outgoing
    mail.

    there are solutions for automatic spam filtering as well, but i don't know
    anything about those.

    btw, doesn't your isp provide some form of spam filtering?

    HTH

    --
    Joost Kremers joostkremers@yahoo.com
    Selbst in die Unterwelt dringt durch Spalten Licht
    EN:SiS(9)

  15. Re: Mail server


    Joost Kremers wrote:
    > Lez wrote:
    > >> what is the reason why you don't want to continue to do this?

    > >
    > > I have 2 PC that get the mail from my ISP, they both leave the mail on
    > > there.
    > > One is set to delete the mail if there is more than 600, so the ISP
    > > has the last 600 emails.
    > > The trouble is I now get about 200 emails a day (190 Spam 10 for us).
    > > My ISP will only hold 1000 emails, about 5 days worth, so if we are
    > > away for a week, the last 2 days emails get bounced!
    > > Hope you understand all of the above.
    > > So what I want to do is hold all the emails on my server at home,
    > > filter them to get out most of the Spam, ready for us to look at them
    > > at our leisure.

    >
    > yes, that makes perfect sense. then you probably want the simplest, easiest
    > solution, not the one where you learn most about running a full-blown mail
    > server. ;-)
    >
    > in that case, i'd recommend fetchmail/getmail and dovecot on the server,
    > and let the email clients connect to the smtp server of your isp directly
    > for outgoing mail.
    >
    > note that fetchmail and getmail need some way of knowing where to drop the
    > mail they receive. fetchmail either needs a mail transer agent (MTA;
    > sendmail, postfix, etc) (i.e. sendmail/postfix etc) or a mail delivery
    > agent (MDA; procmail, maildrop) to do local delivery. getmail, according to
    > the documentation, has the ability to drop mail directly in maildir-style
    > mailboxes.
    >
    > so the set-up should be:
    >
    > 1) fetchmail/getmail: gets mail from ISP and hands it to MDA
    > (alternatively: to MTA).
    >
    > 2 a) procmail/maildrop: receives mail from fetchmail/getmail and delivers it
    > to local mailboxes.
    >
    > b) alternatively: sendmail/postfix.
    >
    > 3) dovecot: imap/pop3 server to make the mail on the server available to
    > local clients.
    >
    > 4) email clients (MUAs): connect to dovecot to read the mail; connect to
    > smtp server of ISP directly to send mail (alternatvely: connect to MTA on
    > your local server to send mail).
    >
    > personally, i'd forget about using sendmail/postfix, and go with the MDA
    > option and direct connections to from mail clients to isp for outgoing
    > mail.
    >
    > there are solutions for automatic spam filtering as well, but i don't know
    > anything about those.
    >
    > btw, doesn't your isp provide some form of spam filtering?
    >


    Thanks for the above it starts to make sense.

    Yes they have they put *** SPAM *** in the subject heading of what
    "it" thinks is spam.
    I still get the emails but at least I have an idea of what is spam.

    I am starting to set things up using fetchmail procmail & dovecot. At
    least now I know where to start looking.

    Lez


  16. Re: Mail server

    Lez wrote:
    > Yes they have they put *** SPAM *** in the subject heading of what
    > "it" thinks is spam.
    > I still get the emails but at least I have an idea of what is spam.


    that also makes it easy for you to tell procmail to put those messages in a
    separate mail folder, if you wish.


    --
    Joost Kremers joostkremers@yahoo.com
    Selbst in die Unterwelt dringt durch Spalten Licht
    EN:SiS(9)

  17. Re: Mail server

    Lez says:
    k
    >I have read various docs about email & am starting to understand how
    >complex it can be.
    >I have fetchmail, dovecot, sendmail & postfix installed on my server.
    >I know I don't need all of these, I just need to choose which ones to
    >use.
    >My server is set up as shuttle.mygroup on a 192.168.0 network, all is
    >running OK.


    Are you running a _real_ server? Email is easily retrieved without
    using any of that stuff, using Pan or Thunderbird or Sylpheed or
    whatever. Most modern mail clients can be setup to handle all your
    email needs.

    Of course, if you are just playing around, pretending to be Sylvan
    Robitaille or something...

    >I have a couple of questions.
    >1. Does the server name need changing & if so to what, I am only
    >looking to pick mail up from my ISP & hold it for local delivery.
    >2. What of the above programs should I use (easy to set up I hope)


    sendmail is setup by default. And you need fetchmail and that's it
    if you are going to use a primitive client like mutt or elm. Or
    even nail.

    >I know I may sound a little stupid but this is all new to me, I have
    >alway pulled my email from my ISP.


    The only way to get around using a pop3 mail server (or at least an
    imap server, if that is what your isp is using - and that's
    doubtful) is to have your own domain name, setup properly with
    nameservers and all the rest. Otherwise, you are stuck with a
    fetchmail/sendmail combo OR a modern email client like thunderbird.
    You can access any number of accounts using thunderbird or pan or
    whatever and you don't need either fetchmail or sendmail.

    cordially, as always,

    rm

  18. Re: Mail server

    Lez says:
    >Joost Kremers wrote:


    >> > I know I may sound a little stupid but this is all new to me, I have
    >> > alway pulled my email from my ISP.


    >> what is the reason why you don't want to continue to do this?


    >My ISP will only hold 1000 emails, about 5 days worth, so if we are
    >away for a week, the last 2 days emails get bounced!


    Doesn't your ISP have filters to get rid of most of that spam?

    Most do.

    cordially, as always,

    rm

  19. Re: Mail server

    Joost Kremers says:

    >yes, that makes perfect sense. then you probably want the simplest,
    >easiest solution, not the one where you learn most about running a
    >full-blown mail server. ;-)


    The simplest solution is to install thunderbird and have it poll the
    popserver every hour or 10 minutes or so, and set thunderbird to
    delete the mail from the ISP's server, once it is retrieved. There
    is no need to build the wheel from scratch, unless your hobby is
    building wheels from scratch. The programs you are suggesting are
    archaic, and while perhaps suitable for a large, cheap, server, they
    are entirely unsuitable for the single user. He could learn how to
    set thunderbird up properly, and actually set it up properly, in
    less time than it took to write this paragraph.

    cordially, as always,

    rm

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