a couple questions - Slackware

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  1. a couple questions

    I installed Slackware v.11. I'm new to Linux. I have the Slackware pdf
    manual also the online reference and I learned to navigate a little bit but
    I don't know enough to be able to find the answers to some basic questions.

    1) in DOS you can output a text file to the screen by entering TYPE
    filename. Actually you can send any kind of file to the screen that way. I
    don't know how to do that in Linux. This capability is very useful. You
    dont know what's in a file is so you send it to the screen and get an idea
    what kind of file it is, what's in various kinds of files. Can be very
    instructive. I tried everything I can think of. How do I do it ?

    2) I'm using MAN to look at various commands I come across. Is there some
    way to get a list of all commands to browse, or a list of a category of
    commands? I'm just randomly finding isolated points in a big universe - I
    would rather I had a view of the universe that I can browse thru.

    3) In some directory listings the items are in colored text. I think I
    noticed that 'devices' are in yellow. Others are in blue, green, pink,
    bright blue etc. Where do I find info about what the colors are? Some
    items have names that end in characters like @ or * Where can I find info
    that tells about those?

    4) keys function more and differently than they do in DOS. They affect
    more things (like scroll lock, print screen, esc). Where can I find info
    about keys.

    TIA Bill S.



  2. Re: a couple questions

    El Sat, 22 Sep 2007 02:13:52 -0700, Emerald Saint escribió:

    > I installed Slackware v.11. I'm new to Linux. I have the Slackware pdf
    > manual also the online reference and I learned to navigate a little bit
    > but I don't know enough to be able to find the answers to some basic
    > questions.
    >

    The latest version is Slackware 12.0, I don't know if you have a good
    reason to not use it, if not I think is better to use allways the latest
    version (specially if you install a new system).

    > 1) in DOS you can output a text file to the screen by entering TYPE
    > filename. Actually you can send any kind of file to the screen that
    > way. I don't know how to do that in Linux. This capability is very
    > useful. You dont know what's in a file is so you send it to the screen
    > and get an idea what kind of file it is, what's in various kinds of
    > files. Can be very instructive. I tried everything I can think of.
    > How do I do it ?
    >

    Use cat to display the contents of a text file (eg cat filename.txt). To
    know what kind of file you have use file command (eg file
    filename.extension). It's a bit old but this howto may help you:
    http://tldp.org/HOWTO/DOS-Win-to-Linux-HOWTO.html
    There are lots of howtos in that site, and, if you installed the
    apropiate packages, those howtos and faqs are in your
    /usr/doc/Linux-HOWTOs and /usr/doc/Linux-FAQs directories.
    See also this site:
    http://www.yolinux.com/TUTORIALS/uni...dos_users.html

    > 2) I'm using MAN to look at various commands I come across. Is there
    > some way to get a list of all commands to browse, or a list of a
    > category of commands? I'm just randomly finding isolated points in a
    > big universe - I would rather I had a view of the universe that I can
    > browse thru.
    >

    Use the info command (press the 'h' key to get an usage introduction),
    apropos and whatis are other alternatives but you must know the name of
    the command to use these.

    > 3) In some directory listings the items are in colored text. I think I
    > noticed that 'devices' are in yellow. Others are in blue, green, pink,
    > bright blue etc. Where do I find info about what the colors are? Some
    > items have names that end in characters like @ or * Where can I find
    > info that tells about those?
    >

    /etc/DIR_COLORS is the config file of the dircolors command.
    Filenames that end in * are executable, those which end in @ are symbolic
    links.
    Use the file command to know what is each file.

    > 4) keys function more and differently than they do in DOS. They affect
    > more things (like scroll lock, print screen, esc). Where can I find
    > info about keys.
    >

    Run the command 'info bash' and select the Command Line Editing section.

    Hope this helps.


  3. Re: a couple questions

    dieymir wrote:
    > Use cat to display the contents of a text file (eg cat filename.txt).


    if you really want to look at a file's contents, 'less' is usually more
    practical, because it gives you the ability to see the file one screenful
    at a time, go back and forth through the file, search, etc.

    besides, in slackware, less is set up so that you can use it on archive
    files (.tar, .tar.gz, .zip, etc) and it'll list the files in the archive
    for you.


    --
    Joost Kremers joostkremers@yahoo.com
    Selbst in die Unterwelt dringt durch Spalten Licht
    EN:SiS(9)

  4. Re: a couple questions

    dieymir (dieymir@yahoo.es) writes:

    > Use cat to display the contents of a text file (eg cat filename.txt). To
    > know what kind of file you have use file command (eg file
    > filename.extension). It's a bit old but this howto may help you:
    > http://tldp.org/HOWTO/DOS-Win-to-Linux-HOWTO.html
    > There are lots of howtos in that site, and, if you installed the
    > apropiate packages, those howtos and faqs are in your
    > /usr/doc/Linux-HOWTOs and /usr/doc/Linux-FAQs directories.
    > See also this site:
    > http://www.yolinux.com/TUTORIALS/uni...dos_users.html
    >

    And of course, the HOWTOs are standard in a Slackware distribution.
    If they're installed, they are in /usr/doc/Linux-HOWTOs

    Of course, /usr/doc is full of interesting stuff for the newcomer
    (and even the oldtimer, since one doesn't actually use all the
    software at the same moment, right after you install Linux).

  5. Re: a couple questions

    On Sep 22, 12:13 pm, "Emerald Saint" wrote:
    > I installed Slackware v.11. I'm new to Linux. I have the Slackware pdf
    > manual also the online reference and I learned to navigate a little bit but
    > I don't know enough to be able to find the answers to some basic questions.


    Now when I'm looking into my first experience with Linux, I think that
    the most important thing for newbies is Midnight Commander (mc). At
    least you can change directories, have a look into files and edit
    them.

    ---
    Bogdan


  6. Re: a couple questions

    (B.Yanchitsky@gmail.com) writes:
    > On Sep 22, 12:13 pm, "Emerald Saint" wrote:
    >> I installed Slackware v.11. I'm new to Linux. I have the Slackware pdf
    >> manual also the online reference and I learned to navigate a little bit but
    >> I don't know enough to be able to find the answers to some basic questions.

    >
    > Now when I'm looking into my first experience with Linux, I think that
    > the most important thing for newbies is Midnight Commander (mc). At
    > least you can change directories, have a look into files and edit
    > them.
    >

    That is good advice, though I'd have suggested Lynx. I imagine
    some of it is that it was the only browser I had for five years,
    indeed the only browser I'd put any real use on, until I got
    Linux in mid-2001. It was thus very familiar.

    But you're right, browsing the directories in some way is
    easier than using cd to change directories and using less.
    Especially at this point when people are used to the idea
    of browsers.

    Michael


  7. Re: a couple questions

    On Sat, 22 Sep 2007 02:13:52 -0700, Emerald Saint wrote:

    > I installed Slackware v.11. I'm new to Linux. I have the Slackware pdf
    > manual also the online reference and I learned to navigate a little bit but
    > I don't know enough to be able to find the answers to some basic questions.
    >
    > 1) in DOS you can output a text file to the screen by entering TYPE
    > filename. Actually you can send any kind of file to the screen that way. I
    > don't know how to do that in Linux. This capability is very useful. You
    > dont know what's in a file is so you send it to the screen and get an idea
    > what kind of file it is, what's in various kinds of files. Can be very
    > instructive. I tried everything I can think of. How do I do it ?


    'cat' would be the technical equivalent of TYPE. Often you want to pipe
    that through a paging filter - like 'more'. So I usually just use 'more
    filename'.

    >
    > 2) I'm using MAN to look at various commands I come across. Is there some
    > way to get a list of all commands to browse, or a list of a category of
    > commands? I'm just randomly finding isolated points in a big universe - I
    > would rather I had a view of the universe that I can browse thru.


    Try 'xman'.

    >
    > 3) In some directory listings the items are in colored text. I think I
    > noticed that 'devices' are in yellow. Others are in blue, green, pink,
    > bright blue etc. Where do I find info about what the colors are? Some
    > items have names that end in characters like @ or * Where can I find info
    > that tells about those?


    Try 'file filename' to get more information.

    >
    > 4) keys function more and differently than they do in DOS. They affect
    > more things (like scroll lock, print screen, esc). Where can I find info
    > about keys.
    >
    > TIA Bill S.



  8. Re: a couple questions

    "Emerald Saint" wrote:
    > 1) in DOS you can output a text file to the screen by entering TYPE


    Others have explained cat, more and less.

    > 2) I'm using MAN to look at various commands I come across. Is there some
    > way to get a list of all commands to browse, or a list of a category of
    > commands? I'm just randomly finding isolated points in a big universe - I
    > would rather I had a view of the universe that I can browse thru.


    As someone else has said, xman is really nice. However this assumes that
    you have X up and running.

    > 3) In some directory listings the items are in colored text. I think I
    > noticed that 'devices' are in yellow. Others are in blue, green, pink,
    > bright blue etc. Where do I find info about what the colors are? Some
    > items have names that end in characters like @ or * Where can I find info
    > that tells about those?


    As you might have guessed: "man ls" Pay attention to the sections
    describing the -F switch.

    > 4) keys function more and differently than they do in DOS. They affect
    > more things (like scroll lock, print screen, esc). Where can I find info
    > about keys.


    This depends on the program interpreting the keys. Those programs could
    be a shell like bash (which is a lot more advanced than command.com in
    DOS), a terminal emulator like xterm or a window manager in X.

    regards Henrik
    --
    The address in the header is only to prevent spam. My real address is:
    hc1(at)poolhem.se Examples of addresses which go to spammers:
    root@localhost postmaster@localhost


  9. Re: a couple questions

    ray wrote:
    > 'cat' would be the technical equivalent of TYPE. Often you want to pipe
    > that through a paging filter - like 'more'. So I usually just use 'more
    > filename'.


    Linux "more" isn't all that good, try either "less" or "most" (both
    should be in a default Slackware installation, if not, try installing
    the less-394-i486-1 and/or the most-4.10.2-i486-1 packages, from the
    "slackware/a" cq "slackware/ap" subdirs on the first CD (I'm assuming
    Slackware 11.0 here, as that was the version the OP mentioned in his
    message)).

    > Try 'file filename' to get more information.


    Also, for the colors, look at /etc/DIR_COLORS (with either less
    or most, or - if you really must, more). It IS a normal text files,
    as are most Linux config files.
    --
    ************************************************** ******************
    ** Eef Hartman, Delft University of Technology, dept. EWI/TW **
    ** e-mail: E.J.M.Hartman@math.tudelft.nl, fax: +31-15-278 7295 **
    ** snail-mail: P.O. Box 5031, 2600 GA Delft, The Netherlands **
    ************************************************** ******************

  10. Re: a couple questions

    Henrik Carlqvist says:
    >"Emerald Saint" wrote:
    >> 1) in DOS you can output a text file to the screen by entering TYPE


    >Others have explained cat, more and less.


    The best one of them all is "most." And if you know DOS, then you
    should know Norton Commander and its clones. The equivalent is "mc"
    or midnight commander, for linux.

    cordially, as always,

    rm

  11. Re: a couple questions

    Emerald Saint wrote:

    > 2) I'm using MAN to look at various commands I come across. Is there some
    > way to get a list of all commands to browse, or a list of a category of
    > commands? I'm just randomly finding isolated points in a big universe - I
    > would rather I had a view of the universe that I can browse thru.


    man whatis. Then, man apropos. Apropos is incredibly useful for finding
    commands you suspect exist, but cannot name.

    Browse these directories:
    /sbin
    /bin
    /usr/sbin
    /usr/bin


    --
    Old Man

    "Swagger isn't courage." Lee Iacocca

  12. Re: a couple questions

    Old Man wrote:
    > Emerald Saint wrote:
    >
    >> 2) I'm using MAN to look at various commands I come across. Is there some
    >> way to get a list of all commands to browse, or a list of a category of
    >> commands? I'm just randomly finding isolated points in a big universe - I
    >> would rather I had a view of the universe that I can browse thru.

    >
    > man whatis. Then, man apropos. Apropos is incredibly useful for finding
    > commands you suspect exist, but cannot name.
    >
    > Browse these directories:
    > /sbin
    > /bin
    > /usr/sbin
    > /usr/bin
    >
    >

    Also try "xman".

  13. Re: a couple questions

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    leee0 wrote:
    >>
    >>

    > Also try "xman".


    This assumes X is running. If it isn't, you'll get an error
    about no display being set. Since we don't know which runlevel the OP
    is in, it isn't wise to assume that they are in X.

    BL.
    - --
    Brad Littlejohn | Email: tyketto@sbcglobal.net
    Unix Systems Administrator, | tyketto@ozemail.com.au
    Web + NewsMaster, BOFH.. Smeghead! | http://www.wizard.com/~tyketto
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  14. Re: a couple questions

    On Sep 22, 10:55 pm, et...@FreeNet.Carleton.CA (Michael Black) wrote:
    > That is good advice, though I'd have suggested Lynx. I imagine
    > some of it is that it was the only browser I had for five years,
    > indeed the only browser I'd put any real use on, until I got
    > Linux in mid-2001. It was thus very familiar.
    >
    > But you're right, browsing the directories in some way is
    > easier than using cd to change directories and using less.
    > Especially at this point when people are used to the idea
    > of browsers.
    >
    > Michael


    Lynx or whatever else, I primary had in mean a file manager. That's
    important to keep courage at the beginning, when everything looks
    very strange and unclear, with a file manager user is able to produce
    basic unix activity and read manuals.

    ---
    Bogdan


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