Memory upgrade - Slackware

This is a discussion on Memory upgrade - Slackware ; So I have 512 mb on my laptop and I have the swap setings at 1 gig. Now I have getting a 1 gig to add to it, so I will have 1256 mb until I get my additional gig. ...

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Thread: Memory upgrade

  1. Memory upgrade

    So I have 512 mb on my laptop and I have the swap setings at 1 gig. Now
    I have getting a 1 gig to add to it, so I will have 1256 mb until I get
    my additional gig. Do I have to resize my swap partition? My problem
    here is that if that is mandatory, I don't have anymore space to
    allocate to the swap partition. My current HDD is small and max out.

  2. Re: Memory upgrade

    On Tue, 18 Sep 2007 19:25:42 -0400, frz wrote:

    > So I have 512 mb on my laptop and I have the swap setings at 1 gig. Now
    > I have getting a 1 gig to add to it, so I will have 1256 mb until I get
    > my additional gig. Do I have to resize my swap partition?


    No. With that much RAM you probably do not even need swap space on your
    HDD.

  3. Re: Memory upgrade

    On 2007-09-18, frz wrote:
    > So I have 512 mb on my laptop and I have the swap setings at 1 gig. Now
    > I have getting a 1 gig to add to it, so I will have 1256 mb until I get
    > my additional gig. Do I have to resize my swap partition? My problem
    > here is that if that is mandatory, I don't have anymore space to
    > allocate to the swap partition. My current HDD is small and max out.


    It's not mandatory, but if it were you could simply add a swap file.
    See man mkswap if you feel like you need to do this. (Personally I
    wouldn't bother adding more swap space.)

    --keith


    --
    kkeller-usenet@wombat.san-francisco.ca.us
    (try just my userid to email me)
    AOLSFAQ=http://www.therockgarden.ca/aolsfaq.txt
    see X- headers for PGP signature information


  4. Re: Memory upgrade

    frz wrote:
    > So I have 512 mb on my laptop and I have the swap setings at 1 gig. Now
    > I have getting a 1 gig to add to it, so I will have 1256 mb until I get
    > my additional gig. Do I have to resize my swap partition? My problem
    > here is that if that is mandatory, I don't have anymore space to
    > allocate to the swap partition. My current HDD is small and max out.


    You got more memory so the system would swap less, no?

    The old story about needing swap=2xRAM doesn't apply to modern systems
    (where heavy swapping usually means bigger problems). On Linux, swap
    is only needed when the system runs out of RAM; if processes are using
    1.5G on a system with 1G RAM, then there needs to be at least 0.5G of
    swap.

    The one utility which does need swap >= RAM is software suspend --
    since this copies RAM to the swap partition before powering down.

    - Daniel

  5. Re: Memory upgrade

    D Herring wrote:
    >
    > The old story about needing swap=2xRAM doesn't apply to modern systems
    > (where heavy swapping usually means bigger problems). On Linux, swap
    > is only needed when the system runs out of RAM; if processes are using
    > 1.5G on a system with 1G RAM, then there needs to be at least 0.5G of
    > swap.


    I've lost count of how many times the rules for optimum swap space have
    changed. I'm not sure if it is correct to say that the 2XRAM swap rule
    no longer applies. It didn't for a while, but did again after some more
    VM work. I don't know if it changed again. No swap space is necessary,
    but for optimum performace and maximum load (not something most people
    need to be concerned about), 2XRAM was valid for "modern" Linux (the last
    I looked anyway). I always like to have at least some swap space. I figure
    some bug in the kernel could get introduced that under certain conditions
    assumes swap at least exists, so having some swap available would eliminate
    the bug (it happened in the past).

    - Kurt

  6. Re: Memory upgrade

    Responding to ~kurt...
    > D Herring wrote:
    >>
    >> The old story about needing swap=2xRAM doesn't apply to modern systems
    >> (where heavy swapping usually means bigger problems). On Linux, swap
    >> is only needed when the system runs out of RAM; if processes are using
    >> 1.5G on a system with 1G RAM, then there needs to be at least 0.5G of
    >> swap.

    >
    > I've lost count of how many times the rules for optimum swap space have
    > changed. I'm not sure if it is correct to say that the 2XRAM swap rule
    > no longer applies. It didn't for a while, but did again after some more
    > VM work. I don't know if it changed again. No swap space is necessary,
    > but for optimum performace and maximum load (not something most people
    > need to be concerned about), 2XRAM was valid for "modern" Linux (the last
    > I looked anyway). I always like to have at least some swap space. I figure
    > some bug in the kernel could get introduced that under certain conditions
    > assumes swap at least exists, so having some swap available would eliminate
    > the bug (it happened in the past).
    >
    > - Kurt


    And you don't have to reserve partitions for it. Just create a file
    somewhere with a bit of space for it.

    http://www.faqs.org/docs/linux_admin/x1762.html

    --
    Yellow Submarine?
    Nah. Its a TeaPot!
    www.tinyurl.com/382gmp

  7. Re: Memory upgrade

    Mike wrote:


    > And you don't have to reserve partitions for it. Just create a file
    > somewhere with a bit of space for it.
    >
    > http://www.faqs.org/docs/linux_admin/x1762.html
    >


    Would that not run slower than an ordinary swap partition?

    Pete

    --
    http://www.petezilla.co.uk

  8. Re: Memory upgrade

    Peter Chant (REMpeteOVE@CAPpetezilla.ITALSco.uk) writes:
    > Mike wrote:
    >
    >
    >> And you don't have to reserve partitions for it. Just create a file
    >> somewhere with a bit of space for it.
    >>
    >> http://www.faqs.org/docs/linux_admin/x1762.html
    >>

    >
    > Would that not run slower than an ordinary swap partition?
    >

    I haven't a clue.

    But the issue here is that a swap file doesn't carve out a partition
    that is unusable for anything else. You can set one up if you
    are expecting a lot of memory use, and then take it away when
    you stop using that memory intensive application.

    Michael


  9. Re: Memory upgrade

    On 2007-09-19, Peter Chant wrote:
    > Mike wrote:
    >
    >> And you don't have to reserve partitions for it. Just create a file
    >> somewhere with a bit of space for it.
    >>
    >> http://www.faqs.org/docs/linux_admin/x1762.html

    >
    > Would that not run slower than an ordinary swap partition?


    IIRC it does, but if you need it in a pinch it's a lot faster than
    trying to repartition to free up space for more swap.

    --keith

    --
    kkeller-usenet@wombat.san-francisco.ca.us
    (try just my userid to email me)
    AOLSFAQ=http://www.therockgarden.ca/aolsfaq.txt
    see X- headers for PGP signature information


  10. Re: Memory upgrade

    Responding to Keith Keller...
    > On 2007-09-19, Peter Chant wrote:
    >> Mike wrote:
    >>
    >>> And you don't have to reserve partitions for it. Just create a file
    >>> somewhere with a bit of space for it.
    >>>
    >>> http://www.faqs.org/docs/linux_admin/x1762.html

    >>
    >> Would that not run slower than an ordinary swap partition?

    >
    > IIRC it does, but if you need it in a pinch it's a lot faster than
    > trying to repartition to free up space for more swap.
    >


    Er, yeah. What Keith said, from what I recall reading up on.

    Plus, with today's hardware, and I mean anything past a 500Mhz CPU
    here, swap is only going to be one of those "top out" things rather
    than in regular use by the system. Unless absolute performance is an
    issue, I'd just stick a swap file somewhere as a "just in case"
    thing.

    FWIW, I'm running an oldish P800/512Mb with no swapfile/partition
    assigned. Nothing has had a problem so far, and I run movies on it
    while working on it.

    Maybe I should create a swap file somewhere, just as a safety belt?

    --
    Yellow Submarine?
    Nah. Its a TeaPot!
    www.tinyurl.com/382gmp

  11. Re: Memory upgrade

    On Wed, 19 Sep 2007 03:06:08 +0000, ~kurt wrote:
    > I've lost count of how many times the rules for optimum swap space have
    > changed. I'm not sure if it is correct to say that the 2XRAM swap rule
    > no longer applies.


    Actually, the two times RAM rule was not so bad. I think it was
    traditionally introduced partly because swap devices where also used as
    kernel crash dump devices. And for crash dumps which potentially are the
    size of all physical memory, you need more space than the physical
    memory. BSD people often still use this, because it allows for post-
    mortem analysis in the case of a kernel panic. (Although modern BSDs also
    have a kernel debugger.)

    ~ Zeno

  12. Re: Memory upgrade

    On Sep 18, 10:57 pm, D Herring wrote:
    > frz wrote:
    > > So I have 512 mb on my laptop and I have the swap setings at 1 gig. Now
    > > I have getting a 1 gig to add to it, so I will have 1256 mb until I get
    > > my additional gig. Do I have to resize my swap partition? My problem
    > > here is that if that is mandatory, I don't have anymore space to
    > > allocate to the swap partition. My current HDD is small and max out.

    >
    > You got more memory so the system would swap less, no?
    >
    > The old story about needing swap=2xRAM doesn't apply to modern systems
    > (where heavy swapping usually means bigger problems). On Linux, swap
    > is only needed when the system runs out of RAM; if processes are using
    > 1.5G on a system with 1G RAM, then there needs to be at least 0.5G of
    > swap.
    >
    > The one utility which does need swap >= RAM is software suspend --
    > since this copies RAM to the swap partition before powering down.
    >
    > - Daniel


    So I am keeping it that way. I now have 1.5 gig ram on the laptop with
    1 gig sawp. I plan on getting a larger HDD. When I do, I might make
    the 2xRAM swap then just to have it. Thanks for the replies.


  13. Re: Memory upgrade

    On 2007-09-24, frz wrote:
    > So I am keeping it that way. I now have 1.5 gig ram on the laptop with
    > 1 gig sawp. I plan on getting a larger HDD. When I do, I might make
    > the 2xRAM swap then just to have it. Thanks for the replies.


    Unless you open many-many big and heavy programs or big files you can
    use minimal like 100Mbytes.

    I have one testing computer with 256Ram no-swap: no problems.

    Examine how much memory you need. Little swap is good. If you use
    too much of swap, you need RAM not swap. Swap is slow.

    --
    Please excuse my english writing!
    Slackware 12
    Knowledge report: One year, still plenty to learn

  14. Re: Memory upgrade

    On Sep 24, 7:11 pm, korgman wrote:
    > On 2007-09-24, frz wrote:
    >
    > > So I am keeping it that way. I now have 1.5 gig ram on the laptop with
    > > 1 gig sawp. I plan on getting a larger HDD. When I do, I might make
    > > the 2xRAM swap then just to have it. Thanks for the replies.

    >
    > Unless you open many-many big and heavy programs or big files you can
    > use minimal like 100Mbytes.
    >
    > I have one testing computer with 256Ram no-swap: no problems.
    >
    > Examine how much memory you need. Little swap is good. If you use
    > too much of swap, you need RAM not swap. Swap is slow.
    >
    > --
    > Please excuse my english writing!
    > Slackware 12
    > Knowledge report: One year, still plenty to learn


    Ok. New question, do i have to tell the system of the newly install
    ram, edit recognisable ram somewhere? Of course mind you, I have a 512
    mb card inside with the added 1 gig card but, same model and speed. I
    will get the other 1 gig later to have them match.


  15. Re: Memory upgrade


    frz wrote :

    > New question, do i have to tell the system of the newly install
    > ram, edit recognisable ram somewhere?


    That depends on your Slackware version. If its 10.2 or older you'll have
    to compile a new kernel. Slackware 11 or 12 can handle up to 4G.
    --
    Thomas O.

    This area is designed to become quite warm during normal operation.

  16. Re: Memory upgrade

    On Sep 26, 12:04 pm, Thomas Overgaard wrote:
    > frz wrote :
    >
    > > New question, do i have to tell the system of the newly install
    > > ram, edit recognisable ram somewhere?

    >
    > That depends on your Slackware version. If its 10.2 or older you'll have
    > to compile a new kernel. Slackware 11 or 12 can handle up to 4G.
    > --
    > Thomas O.
    >
    > This area is designed to become quite warm during normal operation.


    Thanks, I am running slack 12.


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