Upgrading to Slack 12 - Slackware

This is a discussion on Upgrading to Slack 12 - Slackware ; The test 40G Slackware 12 is up and running. Two Questions: 1. Does the 137G harddrive limitation of Linux still exist in Slack 12? 2. Is there a simple (repeat simple) and reliable method of cloning the work I have ...

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Thread: Upgrading to Slack 12

  1. Upgrading to Slack 12


    The test 40G Slackware 12 is up and running.

    Two Questions:

    1. Does the 137G harddrive limitation of Linux still exist in Slack 12?

    2. Is there a simple (repeat simple) and reliable method of cloning the
    work I have
    done on the 40G drive to a larger 160G drive? Circuit City has them on
    sale this
    week for under $40. I have a program that does this in Windows, cleanly,
    effortlessly,
    with just one click, but I do not know of one for Linux. Any Ideas or
    should I just start
    from scratch and avoid potential problems.

    Thanks!

    Marv

  2. Re: Upgrading to Slack 12

    Marv Soloff wrote:
    > 1. Does the 137G harddrive limitation of Linux still exist in Slack 12?


    Linux has been able to use such big disks since version 2.4.18. There is
    more information about this in the Large Disk HOWTO at
    http://tldp.org/HOWTO/Large-Disk-HOWTO-3.html#ss3.5

    With Slackware 9.1 using kernel 2.4.22 I have been using raid disks with
    sizes of terabytes. Ok, these disks are connected with SCSI or FC so the
    137 GB ATA limit has never applied to them, but at least my examples can
    show that Linux has no problem with disk sizes up to 2 TB.

    > 2. Is there a simple (repeat simple) and reliable method of cloning the
    > work I have done on the 40G drive to a larger 160G drive?


    Short answer: No, there is no simple way.

    Longer answer: To do such cloning you might have to know things like what
    kind of file system(s) the disk is using, if it has more than one
    partition and if you also want to copy, or, rather, re-create boot
    records. You might even end up reading complex documents like the Hard
    Disk Upgrade Mini How-To at
    http://tldp.org/HOWTO/Hard-Disk-Upgrade/index.html

    regards Henrik
    --
    The address in the header is only to prevent spam. My real address is:
    hc1(at)poolhem.se Examples of addresses which go to spammers:
    root@localhost postmaster@localhost


  3. Re: Upgrading to Slack 12



    On Sun, 29 Jul 2007, Marv Soloff wrote:

    Hi Marv,

    > 1. Does the 137G harddrive limitation of Linux still exist in Slack 12?


    2.6 shouldn't have any problems addressing a drive this size. Your IDE
    controller will need to support 48-bit addressing, available in ATA 133
    and later controllers. This page might help:

    http://forums.tweaktown.com/archive/...php/t-762.html

    > 2. Is there a simple (repeat simple) and reliable method of cloning the
    > work I have
    > done on the 40G drive to a larger 160G drive? Circuit City has them on
    > sale this
    > week for under $40. I have a program that does this in Windows, cleanly,
    > effortlessly,
    > with just one click, but I do not know of one for Linux. Any Ideas or
    > should I just start
    > from scratch and avoid potential problems.


    You should be able to acomplish this with dd. Plug in both disks, boot
    from the install CD, then use dd to copy the 40G to the 160G. Assuming
    the 40 is hda and the 160 is hdb, something like this should work:

    dd if=/dev/hda of=/dev/hdb

    That will take a while. When it finishes the excess space (~120 GB) will
    be unallocated.

    SystemRescueCD might be worth a look -- it has an imaging tool to clone the
    drive and Parted to grow your filesystems into the unused space on the
    new disk. I haven't had the opportunity to use it but it looks pretty
    handy.

    http://www.sysresccd.org/Main_Page

    Tom

  4. Re: Upgrading to Slack 12


    Marv Soloff wrote :

    > 1. Does the 137G harddrive limitation of Linux still exist in Slack 12?
    >

    No, the 2.6.* kernels doesn't have this limitation.

    > 2. Is there a simple (repeat simple) and reliable method of cloning
    > the work I have done on the 40G drive to a larger 160G drive?


    Take a look at this howto: /usr/doc/Linux-HOWTOs/Hard-Disk-Upgrade
    --
    Thomas O.

    This area is designed to become quite warm during normal operation.

  5. Re: Upgrading to Slack 12

    In article ,
    Marv Soloff wrote:

    > 2. Is there a simple (repeat simple) and reliable method of cloning
    > the work I have done on the 40G drive to a larger 160G drive?


    This is how I would do it - not one click, but just a few commands.
    Printing this out and following the steps might make it simple for you.

    - Boot with the old hard disk.

    - Log in as root.

    - Go into single-user mode:
    # telinit 1
    This will ensure your system's state does not change while copying.

    - Mount the new hard disk partition somewhere (let's use /mnt/hd as
    an example).

    - Copy over your system:
    # cp -a -x /bin /boot /dev /etc /home /lib /media /mnt /opt \
    /root /sbin /tmp /usr /var /mnt/hd/
    where -a is for archive, and -x is for not copying over any mounted
    filesystems within these directories.

    - # mkdir /mnt/hd/proc /mnt/hd/sys
    Note: these are mount points for virtual file systems created by
    Linux, and not real files, so copying their contents is pointless.

    - Edit /mnt/hd/etc/fstab and /etc/lilo.conf as required to make it
    represent the new situation after the new hard disk becomes your
    boot disk.

    - Run LILO on the new hard disk:
    # lilo -r /mnt/hd

    That should do it. Of course, if you have divided your system over
    several partitions, it gets slightly more complicated, but not
    fundamentally different.

    I hope this helps (if not you, then someone else).

    - Martijn

  6. Re: Upgrading to Slack 12

    Henrik Carlqvist wrote:
    > Marv Soloff wrote:
    >
    >>1. Does the 137G harddrive limitation of Linux still exist in Slack 12?

    >
    >
    > Linux has been able to use such big disks since version 2.4.18. There is
    > more information about this in the Large Disk HOWTO at
    > http://tldp.org/HOWTO/Large-Disk-HOWTO-3.html#ss3.5
    >
    > With Slackware 9.1 using kernel 2.4.22 I have been using raid disks with
    > sizes of terabytes. Ok, these disks are connected with SCSI or FC so the
    > 137 GB ATA limit has never applied to them, but at least my examples can
    > show that Linux has no problem with disk sizes up to 2 TB.
    >
    >
    >>2. Is there a simple (repeat simple) and reliable method of cloning the
    >>work I have done on the 40G drive to a larger 160G drive?

    >
    >
    > Short answer: No, there is no simple way.
    >
    > Longer answer: To do such cloning you might have to know things like what
    > kind of file system(s) the disk is using, if it has more than one
    > partition and if you also want to copy, or, rather, re-create boot
    > records. You might even end up reading complex documents like the Hard
    > Disk Upgrade Mini How-To at
    > http://tldp.org/HOWTO/Hard-Disk-Upgrade/index.html
    >
    > regards Henrik


    Thanks, Henrik. I suspected no good way to clone a Linux disk existed
    but wanted verification. I use http://www.runtime.org/dixml.htm
    (DriveImage XML)
    for my Windows stuff (its free). I generally start off with a fresh, new
    hard drive and
    put one single OS on it. Considering the low prices of HDs today, it
    avoids a lot of
    problems.

    Thanks again,

    Marv

  7. Re: Upgrading to Slack 12

    Tom Canich wrote:
    >
    >
    > On Sun, 29 Jul 2007, Marv Soloff wrote:
    >
    > Hi Marv,
    >
    >> 1. Does the 137G harddrive limitation of Linux still exist in Slack 12?

    >
    >
    > 2.6 shouldn't have any problems addressing a drive this size. Your IDE
    > controller will need to support 48-bit addressing, available in ATA 133
    > and later controllers. This page might help:
    >
    > http://forums.tweaktown.com/archive/...php/t-762.html
    >
    >> 2. Is there a simple (repeat simple) and reliable method of cloning
    >> the work I have
    >> done on the 40G drive to a larger 160G drive? Circuit City has them
    >> on sale this
    >> week for under $40. I have a program that does this in Windows,
    >> cleanly, effortlessly,
    >> with just one click, but I do not know of one for Linux. Any Ideas or
    >> should I just start
    >> from scratch and avoid potential problems.

    >
    >
    > You should be able to acomplish this with dd. Plug in both disks, boot
    > from the install CD, then use dd to copy the 40G to the 160G. Assuming
    > the 40 is hda and the 160 is hdb, something like this should work:
    >
    > dd if=/dev/hda of=/dev/hdb
    >
    > That will take a while. When it finishes the excess space (~120 GB) will
    > be unallocated.
    >
    > SystemRescueCD might be worth a look -- it has an imaging tool to clone the
    > drive and Parted to grow your filesystems into the unused space on the
    > new disk. I haven't had the opportunity to use it but it looks pretty
    > handy.
    >
    > http://www.sysresccd.org/Main_Page
    >
    > Tom


    Many thanks!

    Marv

  8. Re: Upgrading to Slack 12

    Martijn Dekker wrote:
    > In article ,
    > Marv Soloff wrote:
    >
    >
    >>2. Is there a simple (repeat simple) and reliable method of cloning
    >>the work I have done on the 40G drive to a larger 160G drive?

    >
    >
    > This is how I would do it - not one click, but just a few commands.
    > Printing this out and following the steps might make it simple for you.
    >
    > - Boot with the old hard disk.
    >
    > - Log in as root.
    >
    > - Go into single-user mode:
    > # telinit 1
    > This will ensure your system's state does not change while copying.
    >
    > - Mount the new hard disk partition somewhere (let's use /mnt/hd as
    > an example).
    >
    > - Copy over your system:
    > # cp -a -x /bin /boot /dev /etc /home /lib /media /mnt /opt \
    > /root /sbin /tmp /usr /var /mnt/hd/
    > where -a is for archive, and -x is for not copying over any mounted
    > filesystems within these directories.
    >
    > - # mkdir /mnt/hd/proc /mnt/hd/sys
    > Note: these are mount points for virtual file systems created by
    > Linux, and not real files, so copying their contents is pointless.
    >
    > - Edit /mnt/hd/etc/fstab and /etc/lilo.conf as required to make it
    > represent the new situation after the new hard disk becomes your
    > boot disk.
    >
    > - Run LILO on the new hard disk:
    > # lilo -r /mnt/hd
    >
    > That should do it. Of course, if you have divided your system over
    > several partitions, it gets slightly more complicated, but not
    > fundamentally different.
    >
    > I hope this helps (if not you, then someone else).
    >
    > - Martijn


    Many thanks! Will pick up a new HD this week and give your method a try.

    Marv

  9. Re: Upgrading to Slack 12


    Marv Soloff wrote :

    > I suspected no good way to clone a Linux disk existed but wanted
    > verification.


    If there's room for an extra disk in the computer then why not use both?
    I would keep the 40GB disk as systemdisk and then let the new 160GB disk
    serve as /home.
    --
    Thomas O.

    This area is designed to become quite warm during normal operation.

  10. Re: Upgrading to Slack 12

    Thomas Overgaard wrote:
    > Marv Soloff wrote :
    >
    >
    >>I suspected no good way to clone a Linux disk existed but wanted
    >>verification.

    >
    >
    > If there's room for an extra disk in the computer then why not use both?
    > I would keep the 40GB disk as systemdisk and then let the new 160GB disk
    > serve as /home.


    I used to do a dual disk system but in the past ten years or so, the
    three "standalone"
    machines have been alloted separate tasks and all have removable hard
    drives. Here,
    the OS and storage is on one HD, removable, to make re-tasking the CPUs
    easier. These
    machines are run for long periods of time. If the CPU or memory craps
    out, the HD tray is
    pulled and restarted in another machine. I currently run three CPUs with
    a mix of Windows
    95, Windows 98, Windows XP, Linux Slackware 9.1, Linux Slackware 10.2,
    and Ubuntu 7.0.4
    which someone recommended. (Ubuntu also installed and works flawlessly
    on one of my
    laptops BTW) Now a new HD with Slackware 12. Works for me.

    Marv

    Thanks,

    Marv

  11. Re: Upgrading to Slack 12

    Marv Soloff wrote:
    > 1. Does the 137G harddrive limitation of Linux still exist in Slack 12?


    It is a BIOS limitation, not a Slackware one.
    I've used Slackware 10.x on a 250GB drive.
    --
    ************************************************** ******************
    ** Eef Hartman, Delft University of Technology, dept. EWI/TW **
    ** e-mail: E.J.M.Hartman@math.tudelft.nl, fax: +31-15-278 7295 **
    ** snail-mail: P.O. Box 5031, 2600 GA Delft, The Netherlands **
    ************************************************** ******************

  12. Re: Upgrading to Slack 12

    Eef Hartman wrote:
    > Marv Soloff wrote:
    >
    >>1. Does the 137G harddrive limitation of Linux still exist in Slack 12?

    >
    >
    > It is a BIOS limitation, not a Slackware one.
    > I've used Slackware 10.x on a 250GB drive.


    Thanks, Eef - am loading up the 160gb. We'll see what it formats as.

    Marv

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