Slackpkg upgrade-all breaks my system - Slackware

This is a discussion on Slackpkg upgrade-all breaks my system - Slackware ; I am well aware that the UPGRADE.txt is the only recommended and supported way of upgrading Slackware. Nonetheless I wanted to experiment the "slackpkg upgrade-all" method and see what I'd get, as I have a few qemu images which run ...

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Thread: Slackpkg upgrade-all breaks my system

  1. Slackpkg upgrade-all breaks my system

    I am well aware that the UPGRADE.txt is the only recommended and
    supported way of upgrading Slackware. Nonetheless I wanted to
    experiment the "slackpkg upgrade-all" method and see what I'd get, as
    I have a few qemu images which run in snaphot mode, so I can restore
    them any time I damage them.

    My image is Slackware 11.0 with X, kernel 2.4 (sata.i).
    I run:
    # slackpkg update
    # slackpkg upgrade-all

    before upgrading the kernel and I get the same error:

    FATAL : kernel too old

    So I assume it has something to do with the kernel. So I restore the
    image, install the kernel 2.6 huge and relative kernel modules, reboot
    and re-run the above commands.

    Slackpkg offers me a list of packages to upgrade. I select them all
    and start upgrading. No major nor fatal errors appear on screen. Some
    50 mins later I am asked if I want to overwrite the new configuration
    fles, I accept, no major warnings, but the consequences are: I lose
    the network, I can't reboot, the terminal is screwed up. Most packages
    are broken.

    I think the problem is that "slackpkg upgrade-all" upgrades the
    packages in alphabetical order. I didn't expect much, but I am still
    quite disappointed, however slackpkg is alright when I have to install
    or upgrade one package at the time.

    What do you think?

    Ottavio

    http://www.pledgebank.com/boycottvista


  2. Re: Slackpkg upgrade-all breaks my system

    Ottavio Caruso wrote:
    > I am well aware that the UPGRADE.txt is the only recommended and
    > supported way of upgrading Slackware. Nonetheless I wanted to
    > experiment the "slackpkg upgrade-all" method and see what I'd get, as
    > I have a few qemu images which run in snaphot mode, so I can restore
    > them any time I damage them.
    >
    > ----------snip-----------
    >
    > I think the problem is that "slackpkg upgrade-all" upgrades the
    > packages in alphabetical order. I didn't expect much, but I am still
    > quite disappointed, however slackpkg is alright when I have to install
    > or upgrade one package at the time.
    >
    > What do you think?
    >
    > Ottavio
    >
    > http://www.pledgebank.com/boycottvista
    >


    IMHO "upgrade-all" is a BAD idea no matter what OS you run. This is especially true
    when updating full version numbers such as Sialckware 11 -> 12. it won't work. It
    doesn't work with Mac OS X 10.x, it don't work worth a damn in Windows, etc.

    I have found slackpkg fine for incremental updates within a version number.

  3. Re: Slackpkg upgrade-all breaks my system

    King Beowulf says:
    >Ottavio Caruso wrote:


    >> I think the problem is that "slackpkg upgrade-all" upgrades the
    >> packages in alphabetical order. I didn't expect much, but I am still
    >> quite disappointed, however slackpkg is alright when I have to install
    >> or upgrade one package at the time.


    >IMHO "upgrade-all" is a BAD idea no matter what OS you run. This
    >is especially true when updating full version numbers such as
    >Sialckware 11 -> 12. it won't work. It doesn't work with Mac OS X
    >10.x, it don't work worth a damn in Windows, etc.


    We have never "upgraded" slackware. We just move the /home and /etc
    directories to our windows partition and then reformat and do a
    fresh install. Every so often it's good to get rid of a lot of the
    junk that collects on the hard drive. Even so, it is a pain in the
    ass to upgrade a fully functioning computer for no reason other than
    to satisfy anal cravings to stay current. We are putting it off for
    now, even though we have 12.0.

    But we have never had a problem with a windoze upgrade, except
    sometimes you have a package that will only upgrade or a package
    that won't upgrade. But if you actually purchase windoze, (which we
    have done only once) and you get the right package, windoze is easy
    and linux as a whole could learn a lot from the windoze upgrade
    procedures.

    cordially, as always,

    rm

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