VFAT issue upgrading from slackware 10.2 to 11.0 - Slackware

This is a discussion on VFAT issue upgrading from slackware 10.2 to 11.0 - Slackware ; I have a VFAT drive on my dual boot linux 11.0 system. I was running slackware 10.2 and had my cvs root directory on my VFAT drive. All worked well with my settings on my slackware 10.2 system. After starting ...

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Thread: VFAT issue upgrading from slackware 10.2 to 11.0

  1. VFAT issue upgrading from slackware 10.2 to 11.0

    I have a VFAT drive on my dual boot linux 11.0 system. I was running
    slackware 10.2 and had my cvs root directory on my VFAT drive. All
    worked well with my settings on my slackware 10.2 system. After starting
    fresh with a 11.0 install I can no longer modify files on the VFAT
    system unless I am logged in as root.

    Does anyone know the best settings for the fstab for the vfat drive so
    that I can put my cvs directory on it. I would move the cvs to a linux
    drive but the vfat drive is much bigger.

    Thanks for you help.

  2. Re: VFAT issue upgrading from slackware 10.2 to 11.0

    George wrote:
    > I have a VFAT drive on my dual boot linux 11.0 system. I was running
    > slackware 10.2 and had my cvs root directory on my VFAT drive. All
    > worked well with my settings on my slackware 10.2 system. After starting
    > fresh with a 11.0 install I can no longer modify files on the VFAT
    > system unless I am logged in as root.
    >
    > Does anyone know the best settings for the fstab for the vfat drive so
    > that I can put my cvs directory on it. I would move the cvs to a linux
    > drive but the vfat drive is much bigger.


    Add
    umask=0
    to the options for the /etc/fstab entry for your vfat mount, as in
    /dev/sda1 /mnt/usbkey vfat noauto,owner,user,umask=0,noatime 0 0


    --
    Lew Pitcher

    Master Codewright & JOAT-in-training | Registered Linux User #112576
    http://pitcher.digitalfreehold.ca/ | GPG public key available by request
    ---------- Slackware - Because I know what I'm doing. ------


  3. Re: VFAT issue upgrading from slackware 10.2 to 11.0

    On 2007-07-18, George wrote:

    > fresh with a 11.0 install I can no longer modify files on the VFAT
    > system unless I am logged in as root.
    >
    > Does anyone know the best settings for the fstab for the vfat drive so
    > that I can put my cvs directory on it. I would move the cvs to a linux
    > drive but the vfat drive is much bigger.


    permissions for a partition can be set with umask parameters in fstab.
    It typically looks something like this:

    /dev/hdc1 /mnt/hd vfat defaults,umask=022 1 0

    This means permissions for /mnt/hd are 755, the inverse of 022. See
    man mount and man umask.

    nb

  4. Re: VFAT issue upgrading from slackware 10.2 to 11.0

    notbob wrote:
    > permissions for a partition can be set with umask parameters in fstab.
    > It typically looks something like this:
    >
    > /dev/hdc1 /mnt/hd vfat defaults,umask=022 1 0
    >
    > This means permissions for /mnt/hd are 755, the inverse of 022. See
    > man mount and man umask.


    better yet, set fmask and dmask separately. with umask=022, all files on
    the vfat fs are executable, which is most likely not what you want. i mount
    vfat file systems (on usb devices) with the following options:

    uid=joost,gid=users,fmask=133,dmask=022

    this way, all files and directories are owned by user "joost" (me ;-) and
    belong to the group "users"; directories have permissions 755 (which makes
    them executable, i.e. accessible), while files have permissions set to 644,
    so that they are not executable.


    --
    Joost Kremers joostkremers@yahoo.com
    Selbst in die Unterwelt dringt durch Spalten Licht
    EN:SiS(9)

  5. Re: VFAT issue upgrading from slackware 10.2 to 11.0

    On 2007-07-18, Joost Kremers wrote:

    > better yet, set fmask and dmask separately. with umask=022, all files on
    > the vfat fs are executable, which is most likely not what you want. i mount
    > vfat file systems (on usb devices) with the following options:
    >
    > uid=joost,gid=users,fmask=133,dmask=022
    >
    > this way, all files and directories are owned by user "joost" (me ;-) and
    > belong to the group "users"; directories have permissions 755 (which makes
    > them executable, i.e. accessible), while files have permissions set to 644,
    > so that they are not executable.


    That's even better. Wasn't aware of those. Thanks, Joost.

    nb

  6. Re: VFAT issue upgrading from slackware 10.2 to 11.0

    On 2007-07-18, Joost Kremers wrote:
    > notbob wrote:
    >> permissions for a partition can be set with umask parameters in fstab.
    >> It typically looks something like this:
    >>
    >> /dev/hdc1 /mnt/hd vfat defaults,umask=022 1 0
    >>
    >> This means permissions for /mnt/hd are 755, the inverse of 022. See
    >> man mount and man umask.

    >
    > better yet, set fmask and dmask separately. with umask=022, all files on
    > the vfat fs are executable, which is most likely not what you want. i mount
    > vfat file systems (on usb devices) with the following options:
    >
    > uid=joost,gid=users,fmask=133,dmask=022
    >
    > this way, all files and directories are owned by user "joost" (me ;-) and
    > belong to the group "users"; directories have permissions 755 (which makes
    > them executable, i.e. accessible), while files have permissions set to 644,
    > so that they are not executable.



    Yes, much better. Also see http://slackwiki.org/Windows_Partitions for
    a bit more discussion of dmask and fmask options.

    RW

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