Missing initrd? - Slackware

This is a discussion on Missing initrd? - Slackware ; Hi, I'm currently fiddling with Slackware 12.0. I downloaded the 3 CDs, booted on the first one and did a vanilla install... except for one thing: I chose not to install LILO, since my main OS on this PC (on ...

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Thread: Missing initrd?

  1. Missing initrd?

    Hi,

    I'm currently fiddling with Slackware 12.0. I downloaded the 3 CDs,
    booted on the first one and did a vanilla install... except for one
    thing: I chose not to install LILO, since my main OS on this PC (on
    /dev/hda) is CentOS with GRUB already in the MBR. I installed Slack on
    /dev/hdb, then rebooted on CentOS, mounted my Slackware /boot
    partition... and noticed two things.

    1) Plenty of kernels, some of them say 'huge', but no initrd around.
    Looks like I'm going to have to make one, but this is a Catch-22. Which
    kernel do I boot in the meanwhile.

    2) There's a dead (?) link README.initrd. Something must have gone wrong
    here.

    Anyway, I tried to boot any of these kernels (without initrd), but got a
    Kernel Panic.

    Can it be that my problem is somehow related to not installing LILO? Are
    the initrd created during install?

    Cheers,

    Niki

  2. Re: Missing initrd?

    Niki Kovacs a écrit :
    >
    > Anyway, I tried to boot any of these kernels (without initrd), but got a
    > Kernel Panic.
    >

    I'll answer this myself. I didn't even care to try 'huge', because I
    associated 'huge' with something like 'badly requiring an initrd'. I
    selected it anyway in an act of despair, and... hey, it worked )

    Niki

  3. Re: Missing initrd?

    Niki Kovacs (mickey@mouse.com) writes:
    > Niki Kovacs a écrit :
    >>
    >> Anyway, I tried to boot any of these kernels (without initrd), but got a
    >> Kernel Panic.
    >>

    > I'll answer this myself. I didn't even care to try 'huge', because I
    > associated 'huge' with something like 'badly requiring an initrd'. I
    > selected it anyway in an act of despair, and... hey, it worked )
    >
    > Niki


    But surely that's because the initrd does some of the stuff in the "huge"
    kernel.

    The point is to have a place for the modules that you need to boot
    with. Modules can be part of the kernel, or you can make it
    smaller and just load the modules that you need. But if you do the latter,
    and the modules are needed to boot with then you need the initrd to make
    those modules available early.

    The "huge" isn't stripped down, so it basically has everything, and thus
    doesn't need initrd.

    At least, that's the way I read it, without having paid a lot of attention
    since I haven't got to that point yet.

    Michael


  4. Re: Missing initrd?

    On Mon, 16 Jul 2007 17:30:38 +0000, Michael Black wrote:

    >> I'll answer this myself. I didn't even care to try 'huge', because I
    >> associated 'huge' with something like 'badly requiring an initrd'. I
    >> selected it anyway in an act of despair, and... hey, it worked )


    > The "huge" isn't stripped down, so it basically has everything, and thus
    > doesn't need initrd.
    >
    > At least, that's the way I read it, without having paid a lot of
    > attention since I haven't got to that point yet.


    This is correct. The "huge" kernel(s) have support for the most common
    filesystems built into them, which is why you generally need an initrd. I
    have long ago done away with initrd's, by building custom kernels with
    everything I need built in, and therefore no need for *any* modules.



    --
    "Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".


  5. Re: Missing initrd?


    Niki Kovacs wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I'm currently fiddling with Slackware 12.0. I downloaded the 3 CDs,
    > booted on the first one and did a vanilla install... except for one
    > thing: I chose not to install LILO, since my main OS on this PC (on
    > /dev/hda) is CentOS with GRUB already in the MBR. I installed Slack on
    > /dev/hdb, then rebooted on CentOS, mounted my Slackware /boot
    > partition... and noticed two things.
    >
    > 1) Plenty of kernels, some of them say 'huge', but no initrd around.
    > Looks like I'm going to have to make one, but this is a Catch-22. Which
    > kernel do I boot in the meanwhile.
    >
    > 2) There's a dead (?) link README.initrd. Something must have gone wrong
    > here.
    >
    > Anyway, I tried to boot any of these kernels (without initrd), but got a
    > Kernel Panic.
    >
    > Can it be that my problem is somehow related to not installing LILO? Are
    > the initrd created during install?
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Niki


    boot the hugesmp.s kernel, it doesn't require any initrd, then make an
    initrd for the generic-smp kernel for daily use.


  6. Re: Missing initrd?




    Dan C wrote:

    >The "huge" kernel(s) have support for the most common filesystems
    >built into them, which is why you generally need an initrd. I
    >have long ago done away with initrd's, by building custom kernels
    >with everything I need built in, and therefore no need for *any*
    >modules.


    The only time I use initrd is whenI want to make a "boot on
    anything" CD/DVD/USB Stick. And even in that case, the next
    time I make one I ma going to give initramfs a try. See:

    New Models for Initial RAM Disks: Introducing initramfs
    http://www.timesys.com/timesource/march_06.htm

    Tech Tip: How to use initramfs
    http://www.timesys.com/timesource/initramfs.htm

    --
    Guy Macon



  7. Re: Missing initrd?

    Michael Black wrote:
    > The point is to have a place for the modules that you need to boot
    > with. Modules can be part of the kernel, or you can make it
    > smaller and just load the modules that you need. But if you do the latter,
    > and the modules are needed to boot with then you need the initrd to make
    > those modules available early.


    Does anyone know who to determine which 'modules' were used while system
    is booting?

    With modular kernel, I can use 'lsmod' and see what modules were able to
    load properly and it's easy to adjust the configuration for subsqeuent
    boots. But, 'huge' kernel loads and I haven't got a clue how to use that
    to get a list of modules I'd need for modular kernel.

    I tried reading 'dmesg' output and grep-ing the /lib/modules for
    strings. I managed to find a lot of modules like this, but I seem to
    miss something as some modules that load properly with 'huge', won't
    load as modules using modular kernel (I get errors like 'device not
    present' or something like that).

    --
    Milan Babuskov
    http://www.firebirdfaq.org

  8. Re: Missing initrd?

    Niki Kovacs wrote:
    > 2) There's a dead (?) link README.initrd. Something must have gone wrong
    > here.


    If you installed the mkinitrd package, it's in /usr/doc/mkinitrd-1.1.2
    with a link to it in /boot.

    Peter

  9. Re: Missing initrd?

    On 2007-07-17, Milan Babuskov wrote:

    > Does anyone know who to determine which 'modules' were used while system
    > is booting?


    Here's a link on slack boot:

    http://openskills.info/infobox.php?IDbox=1042

    It may have changed a bit with slack 12.

    nb

  10. Re: Missing initrd?

    On Jul 16, 12:08 pm, Niki Kovacs wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I'm currently fiddling with Slackware 12.0. I downloaded the 3 CDs,
    > booted on the first one and did a vanilla install... except for one
    > thing: I chose not to install LILO, since my main OS on this PC (on
    > /dev/hda) is CentOS with GRUB already in the MBR. I installed Slack on
    > /dev/hdb, then rebooted on CentOS, mounted my Slackware /boot
    > partition... and noticed two things.
    >
    > 1) Plenty of kernels, some of them say 'huge', but no initrd around.
    > Looks like I'm going to have to make one, but this is a Catch-22. Which
    > kernel do I boot in the meanwhile.
    >
    > 2) There's a dead (?) link README.initrd. Something must have gone wrong
    > here.
    >
    > Anyway, I tried to boot any of these kernels (without initrd), but got a
    > Kernel Panic.
    >
    > Can it be that my problem is somehow related to not installing LILO? Are
    > the initrd created during install?
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Niki



    I'm not sure how useful this information will be because I certainly
    have not yet come to an understanding of how Slackware 12.0 boot
    works. But there is an initrd.img file in the root directory on the
    first Slackware 12.0 CD. It seems to work fine.

    to mount the cd, probably you can create a mount point (e.g. mkdir /
    mnt/iso) and run mount /dev/cdrom /mnt/iso -t iso9660.


  11. Re: Missing initrd?

    On Jul 16, 12:08 pm, Niki Kovacs wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I'm currently fiddling with Slackware 12.0. I downloaded the 3 CDs,
    > booted on the first one and did a vanilla install... except for one
    > thing: I chose not to install LILO, since my main OS on this PC (on
    > /dev/hda) is CentOS with GRUB already in the MBR. I installed Slack on
    > /dev/hdb, then rebooted on CentOS, mounted my Slackware /boot
    > partition... and noticed two things.
    >
    > 1) Plenty of kernels, some of them say 'huge', but no initrd around.
    > Looks like I'm going to have to make one, but this is a Catch-22. Which
    > kernel do I boot in the meanwhile.
    >
    > 2) There's a dead (?) link README.initrd. Something must have gone wrong
    > here.
    >
    > Anyway, I tried to boot any of these kernels (without initrd), but got a
    > Kernel Panic.
    >
    > Can it be that my problem is somehow related to not installing LILO? Are
    > the initrd created during install?
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Niki



    I certainly am not an expert on Slackware 12.0 install and I have my
    own set of problems to prove it -- including a complete(?), non-
    functioning, system rooted in /mnt rather than /. But there is an
    initrd.img file in the root directory on the first Slackware 12.0 CD.
    It seems to work OK. I imagine that you can mount the CD and just cp
    it off to wherever you prefer to put it.


  12. Re: Missing initrd?

    notbob wrote:
    >>Does anyone know who to determine which 'modules' were used while system
    >>is booting?


    Please note that we are talking about drivers compiled into the kernel -
    not external modules.

    > Here's a link on slack boot:
    > http://openskills.info/infobox.php?IDbox=1042


    I read it, but I don't see it mentions that anywhere?

    --
    Milan Babuskov
    http://home.gna.org/vodovod

  13. Re: Missing initrd?

    On Tue, 17 Jul 2007 11:24:59 +0200, Milan Babuskov wrote:

    > Does anyone know who to determine which 'modules' were used while
    > system is booting?


    Boot a live CD like Slax or Knoppix.

    Do

    lsmod > /modules.txt

    Might as well do these too....

    lspci -v > /pci1.txt
    scanpci -v > /pci2.txt
    lsusb -v > /usb.txt

    Muck around in /proc also.

    Save or move the files to somewhere handy like another partition, a
    floppy, wherever you can retrieve them later.

    This should give you enough info for your head to explode AND compile a
    modular kernel too :-)

    I'd use kernel 26.21.5 - Good solid kernel version.

    PS: Once you have the kernel source installed and lets say you have a
    module named whizbang and you have no idea what kernel option that is
    from. Then do this...

    grep -ir whizbang /usr/src/linux | grep -i kconfig | less

    This will find the proper references.

    --
    Linux Help: http://rsgibson.com/linux.htm
    Email - rsgibson@verizon.borg
    Replace borg with net


  14. Re: Missing initrd?

    On Tue, 17 Jul 2007 08:25:19 +0000, Guy Macon wrote:

    > The only time I use initrd is whenI want to make a "boot on anything"
    > CD/DVD/USB Stick. And even in that case, the next time I make one I ma
    > going to give initramfs a try. See:


    Same here, no initrd's for me. I use the method I just described to the
    OP to determine what kernel options to build inline.

    But I keep the original modular kernel option around to boot if I make a
    change or something like that. My default is the inline kernel.

    --
    Linux Help: http://rsgibson.com/linux.htm
    Email - rsgibson@verizon.borg
    Replace borg with net


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