file systems - Slackware

This is a discussion on file systems - Slackware ; On Fri, 22 Jun 2007 11:04:42 +0200, Eef Hartman wrote: > Douglas Mayne wrote: >> I have had success writing single large files to DVDs by using k3b. Just >> check the box, "udf," on the filesystem tab. > > ...

+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 21 to 24 of 24

Thread: file systems

  1. Re: file systems

    On Fri, 22 Jun 2007 11:04:42 +0200, Eef Hartman wrote:

    > Douglas Mayne wrote:
    >> I have had success writing single large files to DVDs by using k3b. Just
    >> check the box, "udf," on the filesystem tab.

    >
    > There is a problem with that, as the "udf" driver had problems (like
    > it could corrupt the whole kernel), since the 2.6.17. kernel
    > the udf filesystem has been restricted to a maximum of 1 GB files ONLY!
    > As the test is not done during READing, you can still read/access larger
    > files, but you cannot create a file > 1 GB on an UDF fs anymore, with
    > those newer kernels.
    >

    Are you saying that 2.6.21.5 from current has this problem? I have just
    started testing with that kernel. Up until now I have been using kernel
    2.6.17.13 on various systems. They have no issues creating dvd's with
    files (with size up to 2^32 bytes). It would be interesting to see which
    version of 2.6.17.x has the problem.

    --
    Douglas Mayne

  2. Re: file systems

    On Fri, 22 Jun 2007 03:35:46 +0000, Joseph H. Rosevear wrote:

    > Douglas Mayne wrote:
    >> On Thu, 21 Jun 2007 02:48:25 +0000, Joseph H. Rosevear wrote:

    >
    > [snip]
    >
    >> I usually use XFS. The wikipedia has some interesting information
    >> comparing filesystems:

    >
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_file_systems

    >
    > Interesting.
    >
    > [snip]
    >
    >> Going OT:

    >
    > What is "OT"?

    Off topic. I use OT to flag subsequent items within the response as not
    strictly related to the original question. I tend to go off topic a lot.

    ;-)

    >



    --
    Douglas Mayne

  3. Re: file systems

    D Herring wrote:

    [snip]

    > > Can I convert an ext2 system to ext3?


    > Yes. An ext3 filesystem is simply an ext2 filesystem with some
    > "invisible" files that store the journaling information.


    > /sbin/tune2fs -j /dev/hdx


    > Then change the filesystem type in /etc/fstab from ext2 to ext3. Its
    > recommended to unmount (and backup?) the partition before running these
    > commands; if you don't, a ".journal" file will be visible until the next
    > time e2fsck runs.


    Thank you very much. That's perfect.

    [snip]

    > P.S. I *have* experienced a data corruption issue on a reiserfs
    > partition that was experienced several years of Slackware upgrades and
    > numerous power outages. By the time I noticed this, a large number of
    > files were unreadable; the filename was there, but the fs complained
    > about corruption. Possibly due to klutziness, my attempts to recover
    > these files resulted in over 2000 files with names like 604_641,
    > 604_642, ... in lost+found. No idea what would have happened with
    > another journaling system (good idea of how this could have trashed a
    > non-journaling fs, though).


    > The point? Journaling is good, but it isn't a magic bullet.


    Thanks for the tips.

    -Joe

  4. Re: file systems

    Eef Hartman wrote:
    > D Herring wrote:
    > >> Can I convert an ext2 system to ext3?

    > >
    > > Yes. An ext3 filesystem is simply an ext2 filesystem with some
    > > "invisible" files that store the journaling information.
    > >
    > > /sbin/tune2fs -j /dev/hdx


    > Preferably on a NON-mounted fs (you cannot do that for the root, of course,
    > except when you're booted up i.e. from CD-rom).


    Actually, I have many Slackware systems available that I can use, since
    I run Slackware from USB drives and use a custom Grub boot disk. With
    the boot disk I can choose the partition I want to mount and use as
    root whether it is on a hard drive installed in the PC or on a hard
    drive in a USB enclosure.

    [snip]

    > >> Does that mean the regular check that occurs every N mounts will be
    > >> faster? That would be cool. Especially since I have large partitions.


    > No, the regular check is a FULL check, not using the journal, the journal
    > is only used on the fsck's after reboot INbetween those full checks.
    > You may want to change the mount count FOR those regular checks, though,
    > you can also do that with tune2fs (I normally put them on every 50th mount).


    Thanks for answering my question.
    > --
    > ************************************************** ******************
    > ** Eef Hartman, Delft University of Technology, dept. EWI/TW **
    > ** e-mail: E.J.M.Hartman@math.tudelft.nl, fax: +31-15-278 7295 **
    > ** snail-mail: P.O. Box 5031, 2600 GA Delft, The Netherlands **
    > ************************************************** ******************


    -Joe

+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2