Re: Mixing current and stable packages, why not? - Slackware

This is a discussion on Re: Mixing current and stable packages, why not? - Slackware ; Ottavio Caruso wrote: > According to the FAQ's: >> DO NOT MIX PACKAGES FROM -CURRENT INTO A STABLE >RELEASE! > >> There are a few notable exceptions to this that will work >fine, but for the most part, the above ...

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Thread: Re: Mixing current and stable packages, why not?

  1. Re: Mixing current and stable packages, why not?

    Ottavio Caruso wrote:
    > According to the FAQ's:
    >> DO NOT MIX PACKAGES FROM -CURRENT INTO A STABLE >RELEASE!

    >
    >> There are a few notable exceptions to this that will work >fine, but for the most part, the above applies. Either upgrade
    >> your system completely to Slackware -current, or stick with
    >> the stable release packages (plus applicable patches).

    >
    > I accept the advice but I'd like to know why.


    To scare away people who aren't aware of the risks?

    > At the end of the day Slackware does not use automatic dependency
    > resolution a-la Debian, so what could possibly happen if install a
    > packages from -current? Would it break the whole system?


    Possibly. Most packages will not break the whole system. Application
    packages would generally only break the specific application.
    Libraries, by their nature, may break other packages. GCC, glibc,
    startup scripts, and the kernel tend to be the most sensitive (depending
    on the change and what you do after upgrading).

    > I think that the worst that can happen is that application won't work.


    As long as the application is "non-critical", feel free to play around.
    Just be prepared for learning/sleuthing/data recovery if/when things
    break. If you've got the resources, playing in a virtual machine (e.g.
    VMware or QEMU) will allow more experimentation with less pain.

    - Daniel

  2. Re: Mixing current and stable packages, why not?

    D Herring wrote:
    > Ottavio Caruso wrote:
    >> According to the FAQ's:
    >>> DO NOT MIX PACKAGES FROM -CURRENT INTO A STABLE >RELEASE!

    >>
    >>> There are a few notable exceptions to this that will work >fine, but
    >>> for the most part, the above applies. Either upgrade
    >>> your system completely to Slackware -current, or stick with
    >>> the stable release packages (plus applicable patches).

    >>
    >> I accept the advice but I'd like to know why.

    >
    > To scare away people who aren't aware of the risks?
    >
    >> At the end of the day Slackware does not use automatic dependency
    >> resolution a-la Debian, so what could possibly happen if install a
    >> packages from -current? Would it break the whole system?

    >
    > Possibly. Most packages will not break the whole system. Application
    > packages would generally only break the specific application. Libraries,
    > by their nature, may break other packages. GCC, glibc, startup scripts,
    > and the kernel tend to be the most sensitive (depending on the change
    > and what you do after upgrading).
    >
    >> I think that the worst that can happen is that application won't work.

    >
    > As long as the application is "non-critical", feel free to play around.
    > Just be prepared for learning/sleuthing/data recovery if/when things
    > break. If you've got the resources, playing in a virtual machine (e.g.
    > VMware or QEMU) will allow more experimentation with less pain.
    >
    > - Daniel


    For the most part I'd like to try out the latest KDE. I found that
    building the KDE sources from -current works fine, but can I recommend
    this to others?

    Regards, Roger.

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