Slackware router? - Slackware

This is a discussion on Slackware router? - Slackware ; would slackware make a good router ?........ ideally i want to bond together my 2 Ethernet ADSL modems....... i already have 2 NIC's fitted to an old Pentium 2 system, 64MBytes of SDRAM should be acceptable but i would have ...

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Thread: Slackware router?

  1. Slackware router?

    would slackware make a good router ?........

    ideally i want to bond together my 2 Ethernet ADSL modems.......

    i already have 2 NIC's fitted to an old Pentium 2 system,
    64MBytes of SDRAM should be acceptable but i would have to check
    the hardware requirements, and an 8GByte hard disk should have me covered
    also

    would this configuration work ?





  2. Re: Slackware router?

    lol wrote:

    > would slackware make a good router ?........


    It has been working for me in that capacity for a number of years.

    > ideally i want to bond together my 2 Ethernet ADSL modems.......
    >
    > i already have 2 NIC's fitted to an old Pentium 2 system, 64MBytes of
    > SDRAM should be acceptable but i would have to check the hardware
    > requirements, and an 8GByte hard disk should have me covered also
    >
    > would this configuration work ?


    If I understand correctly, you're intending to create the following
    configuration:


    +------+ +-------+
    | ISP1 |<----->| ADSL1 |<-----+
    +------+ +-------+ |
    V
    +--------+ +--------------+
    | router |<----->| home network |
    +--------+ +--------------+
    ^
    +------+ +-------+ |
    | ISP2 |<----->| ADSL2 |<-----+
    +------+ +-------+


    Assuming I have that correctly, I think you'll only need an additional
    network interface in the router. An 8GB disk will give you plenty of
    room to have an OS installation with various very useful tools which
    would not normally be found on routing equipment.

    The system I'm currently using as my home network ADSL-gateway is
    woefully underpowered (486DX25 with 32MB RAM; Slackware-3.? installation,
    with many patches and upgrades, but that should give you an idea of
    ho long I've been using Slackware in this capacity), yet it does the
    job reasonably well. I have a simpler setup than I believe you're
    proposing, with only one ADSL provider, mind you, and my traffic needs
    are relatively quite simple (no video or audio streaming, for example).
    Current project underway to replace that with a (slightly) faster system,
    and a modern Slackware installation, but that's moving slowly because
    frankly, the only rush is my belief that the disk in the current router
    doesn't have many more years left in it.

    I hope this helps ...

    --
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Sylvain Robitaille syl@alcor.concordia.ca

    Systems and Network analyst Concordia University
    Instructional & Information Technology Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

  3. Re: Slackware router?

    On Tue, 12 Jun 2007 22:00:18 +0100, "lol" wrote:

    >would slackware make a good router ?........


    Of course! I been using a low power slackware box between localnet
    and the Big bad Internet for years -- ever since I started using ADSL.
    >
    >ideally i want to bond together my 2 Ethernet ADSL modems.......


    You have two concurrent ADSL connections?
    >
    >i already have 2 NIC's fitted to an old Pentium 2 system,


    Then you need another NIC for the localnet, no?

    >64MBytes of SDRAM should be acceptable but i would have to check
    >the hardware requirements, and an 8GByte hard disk should have me covered
    >also


    I started with p120 with 32MB memory and a 3.2GB HDD, boosted that box
    up to p-mmx/233 with 128MB and a 80GB HDD before recently swapping in a
    Celeron/500 with 256MB box.
    >
    >would this configuration work ?


    Yes, although I'm unsure how you going to connect 2 ADSL and localnet
    with only two NICS. Draw up your planned network like Sylvain did in
    his reply to clarify. Mine has:

    # ---------------- ------------ LAN
    # ( ) Phone | | Machines
    # ( Big Bad Internet )--------| ADSL Modem |
    # ( ) Line | | 100-Base-T
    # ---------------- ------------ Switch -----
    # | -------| |
    # Public IP | X_WORLD | -----
    # | | -----
    # ------------- | --| |
    # | ppp0/eth0 | --- | -----
    # optional | | | \ |-- -----
    # second - - - - - -|eth2 eth1|-----|/ /|-----| |
    # localnet | | | \ |-- -----
    # | Firewall | --- | -----
    # ------------- | --| |
    # | -----
    # | -----
    # -------| |
    # X_LOCAL -----
    # 192.168.1.0/24

    Grant.
    --
    http://bugsplatter.mine.nu/

  4. Re: Slackware router?

    On Tue, 12 Jun 2007 21:28:08 +0000 (UTC), Sylvain Robitaille wrote:

    >Current project underway to replace that with a (slightly) faster system,
    >and a modern Slackware installation, but that's moving slowly because
    >frankly, the only rush is my belief that the disk in the current router
    >doesn't have many more years left in it.


    Heh, the 3.2GB HDD in my firewall started squealing a couple years back
    so I had to jump up to 80GB I've since upgraded to a Celeron/500 box
    to get better responsiveness when editing files -- the box is now also
    web server and local install mirror.

    http://bugsplatter.mine.nu/test/boxen/deltree/

    Grant.
    --
    http://bugsplatter.mine.nu/

  5. Re: Slackware router?

    On Tue, 12 Jun 2007 22:00:18 +0100, lol wrote:

    > would slackware make a good router ?........
    >
    > ideally i want to bond together my 2 Ethernet ADSL modems.......
    >
    > i already have 2 NIC's fitted to an old Pentium 2 system, 64MBytes of
    > SDRAM should be acceptable but i would have to check the hardware
    > requirements, and an 8GByte hard disk should have me covered also
    >
    > would this configuration work ?


    Big time. I have been running a Slackware router myself on a 42MB
    486 box, with a 500MB drive. I picked it up about 10 years ago in my
    previous company, since nobody wanted it and they were going to throw it
    away.

    You will have noticed in other replies that many people run their
    routers on pretty pathetic hardware, albeit not quite as pathetic as
    mine. Yours is pathetic indeed, but far less so than mine; it should work
    beautifully.




  6. Re: Slackware router?




    lol wrote:

    >would slackware make a good router ?........
    >
    >ideally i want to bond together my 2 Ethernet ADSL modems.......
    >
    >i already have 2 NIC's fitted to an old Pentium 2 system,
    >64MBytes of SDRAM should be acceptable but i would have to check
    >the hardware requirements, and an 8GByte hard disk should have me covered
    >also
    >
    >would this configuration work ?


    Not only would the above work, it is way overpowered for the purpose
    if you use the right software.

    There are two paths yuo can take, both good:

    IF YOU WANT TO SPEND TIME AND LEARN A LOT:

    Use Slackware. Experiment with the latest release and with one or
    two older releases. Learn how everything works and set it all up.

    IF YOU JUST WANT IT TO SET UP QUICKLY AND TO WORK PROPERLY:

    Download FreeSCO. Follow the directions, answer a few questions,
    and you will have a high-quality Slackware-based router.
    http://www.freesco.org/

    While you are at it, replace your keyboard. It appaers to
    have lost the ability to input upper-case characters.

    --
    Guy Macon






  7. Re: Slackware router?




    Ivar Rosquist wrote:

    >Big time. I have been running a Slackware router myself on a 42MB
    >486 box, with a 500MB drive. I picked it up about 10 years ago in my
    >previous company, since nobody wanted it and they were going to throw it
    >away.
    >
    >You will have noticed in other replies that many people run their
    >routers on pretty pathetic hardware, albeit not quite as pathetic as
    >mine. Yours is pathetic indeed, but far less so than mine; it should work
    >beautifully.


    My FreeSCO (slackware-based) router works great on a 16MHz 386SX
    with 32MB of RAM. The minimum RAM is 8MB but I have not tried
    that configuration.

    You might be able to use a cheap hub to link the two Ethernet
    ADSL modems. Newegg has a 5-port 100BASE-TX w=switching hub
    for $27.


    --
    Guy Macon





  8. Re: Slackware router?

    On 2007-06-13, Ivar Rosquist wrote:
    >
    > Big time. I have been running a Slackware router myself on a 42MB
    > 486 box, with a 500MB drive. I picked it up about 10 years ago in my
    > previous company, since nobody wanted it and they were going to throw it
    > away.
    >
    > You will have noticed in other replies that many people run their
    > routers on pretty pathetic hardware, albeit not quite as pathetic as
    > mine. Yours is pathetic indeed, but far less so than mine; it should work
    > beautifully.


    I used to run my router on a 486, but the power supply fried, so then I
    moved to a P-75 with 16MB of RAM. I pulled the hard disks out of these
    machines so that I could run floppyfw as my router.

    Nowadays I use a Linksys switch/router with OpenWRT, if only to save
    physical space in my home.

    --keith

    --
    kkeller-usenet@wombat.san-francisco.ca.us
    (try just my userid to email me)
    AOLSFAQ=http://www.therockgarden.ca/aolsfaq.txt
    see X- headers for PGP signature information


  9. Re: Slackware router?

    > I used to run my router on a 486, but the power supply fried, so then I
    > moved to a P-75 with 16MB of RAM. I pulled the hard disks out of these
    > machines so that I could run floppyfw as my router.
    >
    > Nowadays I use a Linksys switch/router with OpenWRT, if only to save
    > physical space in my home.


    Not to mention a heap of electricity, the main reason I made a similar
    switch.



  10. Re: Slackware router?



    Leonard The Committed wrote:
    >
    >
    >> I used to run my router on a 486, but the power supply fried, so then I
    >> moved to a P-75 with 16MB of RAM. I pulled the hard disks out of these
    >> machines so that I could run floppyfw as my router.
    >>
    >> Nowadays I use a Linksys switch/router with OpenWRT, if only to save
    >> physical space in my home.

    >
    >Not to mention a heap of electricity, the main reason I made a similar
    >switch.
    >
    >


    How do I quote correctly in usenet?
    http://www.netmeister.org/news/learn2quote2.html

    The advantages of usenet's quoting conventions
    http://www.mccaughan.org.uk/g/remarks/uquote.html

    Rules for posting to Usenet
    http://www.faqs.org/faqs/usenet/posting-rules/part1/

    How To Followup A Post On Netnews Properly
    http://www.star-one.org.uk/computer/format.htm

    Quoting Style in Newsgroup Postings
    http://www.xs4all.nl/%7ewijnands/nnq/nquote.html



  11. Re: OT Guy Macon's foolishness

    Guy Macon wrote:
    > Leonard The Committed wrote:


    >>> I used to run my router on a 486, but the power supply fried, so
    >>> then I moved to a P-75 with 16MB of RAM. I pulled the hard
    >>> disks out of these machines so that I could run floppyfw as my
    >>> router.


    >>> Nowadays I use a Linksys switch/router with OpenWRT, if only to
    >>> save physical space in my home.


    >>Not to mention a heap of electricity, the main reason I made a
    >>similar switch.


    We have left the above text intact to make a point.

    > How do I quote correctly in usenet?
    > http://www.netmeister.org/news/learn2quote2.html


    When responding to a posting in usenet, you should always be on
    topic - you are not. And if you are to go off-topic, you should
    mark the subject line "OT" as we have done above.

    Moreover, when you do respond to text, you clip the text, from the
    posting to which you are responding, that is not relevant to the
    point you are making. We would have snipped the text above, however
    it is relevant to showing that you posted incorrectly, as usual.

    You are a great one for telling others how to do things. But in
    actual fact, you don't have a clue. Most of your information is
    either outdated, second hand junk that you glean from google. Or it
    is just plain, outright wrong.

    You have been asked before, by many others, to stop posting to this
    newsgroup until you have shown that you have the technical ability
    and knowledge necessary to make a contribution. Most of the
    reputable posters to this ng have at least one technical degree, and
    many have two. If you had even a single year of college, you might
    learn to see just how utterly foolish you appear.

    We ask you again to stop posting to this ng.

    cordially, as always,

    rm

  12. Re: Slackware router?




    Leonard The Committed wrote:

    >That looks like too much work, thats why I asked for something like a
    >grown-up freesco


    Smoothwall, perhaps? I would go and look to see if it meets your
    needs, but that looks like too much work .

    --
    Guy Macon



  13. Re: Incorrect info by Guy Macon

    Guy Macon wrote:
    > Leonard The Committed wrote:


    >>That looks like too much work, thats why I asked for something
    >>like a grown-up freesco


    > Smoothwall, perhaps? I would go and look to see if it meets your
    > needs, but that looks like too much work .


    In other words, you don't know what you are talking about but you
    want to seem helpful in case somebody is watching.

    This means that you're a phony. Everybody knows it. Please stop
    posting.

    cordially, as always,

    rm

  14. Re: Slackware router?

    -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    Hash: SHA1

    On 2007-06-13, Guy Macon wrote:
    > Squid + Authentication + Dansguardian + SARG HOWTO
    > http://www.ysgnet.com/modules.php?op...rticle&sid=164



    Does me proud to hear people still linking to something I wrote a
    couple years ago, and for it to still be valid.


    For the record, I'm gonna be adding squid and dansguardian SlackBuild
    scripts to http://www.slackbuilds.org/ in the not-too-distant future.
    I should have already done this, but I really have to go back over
    them[0] and make sure everything it good-to-go for Slackware-12.0.

    [0] Squid in particular is a PITA to package well. It likes to use
    /var/lib/squid for everything, including log files, so a lot of little
    configure options are required to make it fit well with the Slackware
    layout.

    - --
    It is better to hear the rebuke of the wise,
    Than for a man to hear the song of fools.
    Ecclesiastes 7:5
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  15. Re: Slackware router?

    +Alan Hicks+ wrote:

    pgp trash troll delete

    **** off, Hicks.

    > On 2007-06-13, Guy Macon wrote:


    Two hillbillies from Georgia in the same thread.

    Neither one of you are welcome in this ng.

    cordially, as always,

    rm

  16. Re: Slackware router?

    -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    Hash: SHA1
    NotDashEscaped: You need GnuPG to verify this message

    yaaaaaaaaaaaawwwwwwwwwwwwwwnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn

    he's as welcome here. nono. he's MORE welcome here than u r ya useless
    waste of space turd...


    On Fri, 15 Jun 2007, rm@biteme.org wrote:

    > +Alan Hicks+ wrote:
    >
    > pgp trash troll delete
    >
    > **** off, Hicks.
    >
    >> On 2007-06-13, Guy Macon wrote:

    >
    > Two hillbillies from Georgia in the same thread.
    >
    > Neither one of you are welcome in this ng.
    >
    > cordially, as always,
    >
    > rm
    >


    --
    Cheers
    Res
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  17. Re: Slackware router?

    On Thu, 14 Jun 2007 07:00:56 +0000, Guy Macon wrote:

    >
    >
    >
    > Leonard The Committed wrote:
    >
    >>That looks like too much work, thats why I asked for something like a
    >>grown-up freesco

    >
    > Smoothwall, perhaps? I would go and look to see if it meets your
    > needs, but that looks like too much work .


    Not so much a matter of work, but ability. I'm in in IT (at least for the
    last 7 years) and am setting this up for a non-profit in a volunteer
    situation. It's giving me something to do other than my JOB, I'm a
    hobbiest.


  18. Re: Slackware router?




    Leonard The Committed wrote:
    >
    >Guy Macon wrote:
    >
    >> Leonard The Committed wrote:
    >>
    >>>That looks like too much work, thats why I asked for something like a
    >>>grown-up freesco

    >>
    >> Smoothwall, perhaps? I would go and look to see if it meets your
    >> needs, but that looks like too much work .

    >
    >Not so much a matter of work, but ability. I'm in in IT (at least for the
    >last 7 years) and am setting this up for a non-profit in a volunteer
    >situation. It's giving me something to do other than my JOB, I'm a
    >hobbiest.


    Hmmm. FreeSCO is a full Linux distribution (an older version of
    Slackware) and has a nice feature; booting from a write protected
    floppy, setting up a RAMdisk that is ten times bigger than the
    floppy, copying itself over and running from the RAMdisk, and
    then downloading and running programs loaded on the PC it's
    protecting. It might be fairly simple to make it load whatever
    it takes to add website content filtering. If so, publishing
    instructins on how to do that would be a benefit to others who
    want to do what you want to do.

    --
    Guy Macon







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