British computer games industry history on channel 5 - Sinclair

This is a discussion on British computer games industry history on channel 5 - Sinclair ; In message Lister wrote: > > > >Bah, humbug. I'm glad I can't get C5 here. > > > > I can though. Shall I tape it? TAPE? That's going waaayyy back to the '80s. -- Regards, Philip....

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Thread: British computer games industry history on channel 5

  1. Re: British computer games industry history on channel 5

    In message <4ctja41u0pp0v207dqeuvfaqtvqspvmlsv@4ax.com>
    Lister wrote:

    > >
    > >Bah, humbug. I'm glad I can't get C5 here.
    > >

    >
    > I can though. Shall I tape it?



    TAPE?

    That's going waaayyy back to the '80s.


    --

    Regards,
    Philip.

  2. Re: British computer games industry history on channel 5

    Philip Green wrote:
    > Brits Who Made The Modern World showing on five
    >
    > Time: 19:30 to 20:00 (BST).
    > When: Friday 22nd August on five
    >
    > The documentary series looking at the untold stories of British
    > scientific innovations focuses on the development of Britain's 1.4
    > billion pound computer game industry. In the early 1980s, two pioneering
    > Cambridge undergraduates set out to achieve the seemingly impossible
    > task of developing the world's first 3-D computer game.
    >
    >
    > (Information from www.digiguide.com)
    >



    You can now watch the program here:

    http://demand.five.tv/Episode.aspx?e...me=C5134750003

    Daren
    --
    Walkthrough recordings of speccy games: http://www.rzxarchive.co.uk/
    Speccy game endings: http://www.worldofspectrum.org/speccyspoilers/

  3. Re: British computer games industry history on channel 5

    On Fri, 22 Aug 2008 19:42:48 +0100, Daren wrote:
    > You can now watch the program here:
    >
    > http://demand.five.tv/Episode.aspx?e...me=C5134750003


    .... if you're in the UK.



  4. Re: British computer games industry history on channel 5

    Jules wrote:
    > On Fri, 22 Aug 2008 19:42:48 +0100, Daren wrote:
    >> You can now watch the program here:
    >>
    >> http://demand.five.tv/Episode.aspx?e...me=C5134750003

    >
    > .... if you're in the UK.
    >
    >

    ....or can find a reasonably fast proxy server based there

  5. Re: British computer games industry history on channel 5

    Guesser wrote:
    > ...or can find a reasonably fast proxy server based


    You offering?

  6. Re: British computer games industry history on channel 5

    fuzzix wrote:
    > Guesser wrote:
    >> ...or can find a reasonably fast proxy server based

    >
    > You offering?

    no chance, I said reasonably fast didn't I!

  7. Re: British computer games industry history on channel 5

    As per a discussion on WoS...

    what was new about Elite's 3D engine was hidden-line removal.

  8. Re: British computer games industry history on channel 5

    On 18 Aug 2008 19:31:51 +0100 da kidz on comp.sys.sinclair were rappin'
    to MC Me:

    > > Hence the smiley :-) Maze War (1974) is generally considered the
    > > first*, but I was trying to come up with an early one from the 80s which
    > > wasn't Elite (which I believe is what these TV people seem to be claiming
    > > as the first) - good call on Battle Zone.

    >
    > 3D Monster Maze?


    Ha! It got a mention in the programme as the first 3D game!
    Therefore, I have earnt and doth alfo claim, mine five golden coins
    from thy king himself.

    Chris


    --
    +-------------------------------------------+
    | Unsatisfactory Software - "because it is" |
    | http://www.unsatisfactorysoftware.co.uk |
    | Your Sinclair: A Celebration |
    +- http://www.yoursinclair.co.uk -----------+

    DISCLAIMER: I may be making all this stuff up again.

  9. Re: British computer games industry history on channel 5

    On Mon, 18 Aug 2008 09:32:34 -0500, Jules
    wrote:


    >One of the things that I've learned
    >over the years is that when it comes to computers, it's pretty pointless
    >trying to prove a 'first'. Ideas and concepts tend to appear almost in
    >parallel across the globe, and often record of the early ones lay
    >'undiscovered' in obscure documentation - even when it does come to light,
    >no amount of proof is going to change the accepted picture of what
    >happened...


    A case in point is the perpetual "the first video game was /Pong/"
    bollocks. I even heard this in a phone-in quiz on Radio One one day
    (the caff at which I was lunching had it on); the listener who had
    phoned in was asked something like "was the first video game (a) a
    football game; (b) a tennis game; or (c) a golf game?". Whoever set
    that question obviously didn't research it properly, for the correct
    answer is (d) a space-war game -- this is so regardless of whether
    you're referring to the first *ever* video game (MIT, around 1965,
    forgotten the name) or the first *coin-op* (Computer Space, 1972, by
    the small start-up company who soon renamed themselves Atari). Pong
    (a year or two later) was the first *commercially successful* coin-op,
    not the first *ever* one.
    --
    Zork: one nation, underground, invisible, with loot and adventure for all

  10. Re: British computer games industry history on channel 5

    On Mon, 18 Aug 2008 23:21:02 +0100, Lister
    wrote:

    >On Mon, 18 Aug 2008 16:20:02 -0500, Jules
    > wrote:


    >>Bah, humbug. I'm glad I can't get C5 here.

    >
    >I can though. Shall I tape it?


    Tape[1]? Ye gods, VCRs are so 20th century -- the civilised world[2]
    now uses DVD recorders. :-)

    [1] Knowing you, you probably mean Betamax. :-)
    [2] And Brixton. (I know, I actually live there.)
    --
    Zork: one nation, underground, invisible, with loot and adventure for all

  11. Re: British computer games industry history on channel 5

    Geoff Wearmouth wrote:
    > DigiGuide is a subscription service that costs 9.99 A YEAR not a
    > month. I got that wrong - I thought it seemed a bit expensive. :-)


    If you want a completely free alternative, you could always try
    TellyPrompter which will (among other things) let you set searches for
    programmes you want to see and will then notify you each time you log in to
    your PC about everything that may be of interest in the next 7 days...

    Download it for free from here: www.adamdawes.com

    --

    Adam
    www.adamdawes.com
    www.icangames.com



  12. Re: British computer games industry history on channel 5

    Robert Baker wrote:
    > On Mon, 18 Aug 2008 23:21:02 +0100, Lister
    > wrote:
    >
    >>On Mon, 18 Aug 2008 16:20:02 -0500, Jules
    >> wrote:

    >
    >>>Bah, humbug. I'm glad I can't get C5 here.

    >>
    >>I can though. Shall I tape it?

    >
    > Tape[1]? Ye gods, VCRs are so 20th century -- the civilised world[2]
    > now uses DVD recorders. :-)
    >
    > [1] Knowing you, you probably mean Betamax. :-)
    > [2] And Brixton. (I know, I actually live there.)


    I still have a veydoe...(It's VIDAYO! Ed)
    One of these days I'm going to scan through the stacks of tapes I've got to
    find interesting things and maybe get a tv capture card to encode them.
    --
    | spike1@freenet.co.uk | |
    | Andrew Halliwell BSc | "ARSE! GERLS!! DRINK! DRINK! DRINK!!!" |
    | in | "THAT WOULD BE AN ECUMENICAL MATTER!...FECK!!!! |
    | Computer Science | - Father Jack in "Father Ted" |

  13. Re: British computer games industry history on channel 5

    On Sun, 24 Aug 2008 13:32:10 +0100, Robert Baker wrote:
    > Tape[1]? Ye gods, VCRs are so 20th century -- the civilised world[2]
    > now uses DVD recorders. :-)
    >
    > [1] Knowing you, you probably mean Betamax. :-)


    Heh, U-matic, surely...

    I need to find a nice VCR back in England sometime. I've still got a few
    movies on tape there and of course they won't play here in a US player -
    but hopefully I can hook a UK player to the TV-capture card in my PC and
    spit them out to DVD...

    cheers

    Jules


  14. Re: British computer games industry history on channel 5


    "Robert Baker" wrote ...
    >
    > A case in point is the perpetual "the first video game was /Pong/"
    > bollocks. I even heard this in a phone-in quiz on Radio One one day
    > (the caff at which I was lunching had it on); the listener who had
    > phoned in was asked something like "was the first video game (a) a
    > football game; (b) a tennis game; or (c) a golf game?". Whoever set
    > that question obviously didn't research it properly, for the correct
    > answer is (d) a space-war game -- this is so regardless of whether
    > you're referring to the first *ever* video game (MIT, around 1965,
    > forgotten the name) or the first *coin-op* (Computer Space, 1972, by
    > the small start-up company who soon renamed themselves Atari). Pong
    > (a year or two later) was the first *commercially successful* coin-op,
    > not the first *ever* one.


    If I remember correctly, and I may not..., Pong was the first *home* video
    game. A company that later became Atari released it. Again, IIRC, about
    1967. The box had only one game, Pong, and hooked up to a TV. It did not
    use cartridges. The game could not be changed. You had Pong, and that was
    it!
    --
    Best regards,

    Sam Gillett

    Change is inevitable,
    except from vending machines!



  15. Re: British computer games industry history on channel 5

    On Aug 24, 1:51 pm, Andrew Halliwell wrote:
    > One of these days I'm going to scan through the stacks of tapes I've got to
    > find interesting things and maybe get a tv capture card to encode them.


    I bet it'll be just like my old copied music tapes. Half I don't seem
    to give a crap about now, the other half I downloaded in a night. At
    better quality.
    It's true I tells ya.

  16. Re: British computer games industry history on channel 5

    DanSolo wrote:
    > On Aug 24, 1:51 pm, Andrew Halliwell wrote:
    >> One of these days I'm going to scan through the stacks of tapes I've got to
    >> find interesting things and maybe get a tv capture card to encode them.

    >
    > I bet it'll be just like my old copied music tapes. Half I don't seem
    > to give a crap about now, the other half I downloaded in a night. At
    > better quality.
    > It's true I tells ya.


    I *think* I have a few gems on the tapes I've not managed to find online
    anywhere...

    I might even (god, I hope I do) have a copy of the carling black label
    advert that is absolutely nowhere online but is an all time classic advert.
    cowboys lasso a bloke who then drags them through the next 3 adverts.
    --
    | spike1@freenet.co.uk | Windows95 (noun): 32 bit extensions and a |
    | | graphical shell for a 16 bit patch to an 8 bit |
    | Andrew Halliwell BSc | operating system originally coded for a 4 bit |
    | in |microprocessor, written by a 2 bit company, that|
    | Computer Science | can't stand 1 bit of competition. |

  17. Re: British computer games industry history on channel 5

    On Aug 15, 10:08 pm, Philip Green wrote:
    > Brits Who Made The Modern World showing on five


    I don't suppose this has accidentally, ahem, spilled onto the web yet?

  18. Re: British computer games industry history on channel 5

    DanSolo wrote:
    > On Aug 15, 10:08 pm, Philip Green wrote:
    >> Brits Who Made The Modern World showing on five

    >
    > I don't suppose this has accidentally, ahem, spilled onto the web yet?


    Certainly not seen it on uknova...
    --
    | spike1@freenet.co.uk | "I'm alive!!! I can touch! I can taste! |
    | Andrew Halliwell BSc | I can SMELL!!! KRYTEN!!! Unpack Rachel and |
    | in | get out the puncture repair kit!" |
    | Computer Science | Arnold Judas Rimmer- Red Dwarf |

  19. Re: British computer games industry history on channel 5

    On Mon, 25 Aug 2008 Andrew Halliwell wrote:

    >I might even (god, I hope I do) have a copy of the carling black label
    >advert that is absolutely nowhere online but is an all time classic advert.
    >cowboys lasso a bloke who then drags them through the next 3 adverts.


    Man, I have been scratching my head for YEARS trying to remember what
    that advert was for. Until your post I thought I was the only one who
    remembered it. My late father and I were watching TV when we first saw
    that ad and we were both laughing hysterically. When the woman takes the
    box of soap powder off the shelf and the smiling gap-toothed bandit is
    standing in the next aisle I nearly pissed myself.

    Thank you for proving I'm not insane.

    BTW I have rendered C5's "Elite" show into a nice 180MB AVI but since I
    don't do the torrent stuff and have no way of anonymously uploading to
    usenet, it's kind of stuck here. If anyone can provide me with the
    address of a suitable FTP server I would not object if it then 'escaped'
    into other distribution channels. Or if anyone can be certain their
    system can handle 200MB attachments I could always try e-mailing it.

    --
    Kev
    __________________________________________________ ________________________
    "Public enquiry to be launched into avalanche."
    National Post

  20. Re: British computer games industry history on channel 5

    Robert Baker wrote:

    > A case in point is the perpetual "the first video game was /Pong/"
    > bollocks. I even heard this in a phone-in quiz on Radio One one day
    > (the caff at which I was lunching had it on); the listener who had
    > phoned in was asked something like "was the first video game (a) a
    > football game; (b) a tennis game; or (c) a golf game?". Whoever set
    > that question obviously didn't research it properly, for the correct
    > answer is (d) a space-war game -- this is so regardless of whether
    > you're referring to the first *ever* video game (MIT, around 1965,
    > forgotten the name) or the first *coin-op* (Computer Space, 1972, by
    > the small start-up company who soon renamed themselves Atari). Pong
    > (a year or two later) was the first *commercially successful* coin-op,
    > not the first *ever* one.


    As I think I've said before here, it all rather depends on what you mean
    by "video" game.

    Space War! was certainly the first videogame as we know it - something
    that couldn't have existed before computers with real-time video
    displays - but as far as I've been able to make out, the first
    *computer* game was Noughts and Crosses on the Cambridge EDSAC in 1952
    (which, just to confuse matters, used that machine's CRT-based memory
    monitors to display the board, which *may* be the first instance of a
    more-or-less real-time memory-mapped picture produced by a computer - I
    haven't really looked into that, and whether it had any precedent).

    --
    Duncan Snowden.


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