Eep - Sinclair

This is a discussion on Eep - Sinclair ; I thought CSS had died yonks ago, but here it still is wibbling away. Sought it out because I can't get the WOS forums at work for some reason, and I've started fiddling around with speccies again. Well... hello then ...

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Thread: Eep

  1. Eep

    I thought CSS had died yonks ago, but here it still is wibbling away.

    Sought it out because I can't get the WOS forums at work for some
    reason, and I've started fiddling around with speccies again.

    Well... hello then from Australia once more.

    Warm me a Toastrack 128, I'll be back for breakfast.

    Jeff B

  2. Re: Eep

    InkyFeet wrote:
    > I thought CSS had died yonks ago, but here it still is wibbling away.
    >
    > Sought it out because I can't get the WOS forums at work for some
    > reason, and I've started fiddling around with speccies again.
    >
    > Well... hello then from Australia once more.
    >
    > Warm me a Toastrack 128, I'll be back for breakfast.
    >
    > Jeff B


    JEEEEEEFFFFF!!!!
    Bloody hell, long time no see...
    (how could you THINK that? CSS die? NEVER! (#speccy's still wibbling away
    too, y'know)
    --
    | spike1@freenet.co.uk | |
    | Andrew Halliwell BSc | "The day Microsoft makes something that doesn't |
    | in | suck is probably the day they start making |
    | Computer science | vacuum cleaners" - Ernst Jan Plugge |

  3. Re: Eep

    On Jul 2, 3:33*am, InkyFeet wrote:
    > I thought CSS had died yonks ago, but here it still is wibbling away.
    >
    > Sought it out because I can't get the WOS forums at work for some
    > reason, and I've started fiddling around with speccies again.
    >
    > Well... hello then from Australia once more.
    >
    > Warm me a Toastrack 128, I'll be back for breakfast.
    >
    > Jeff B


    Long time no see cobber. How's life in Brizzy? Lots has been going on
    while you've been absent but maybe you've been lurking on WoS and seen
    all the updates. If not then there's Winston's Ethernet project, Chris
    Smith's Harlequin SE project (which I'm looking forward to getting
    hold of as the SE prototype has died), more games than you can shake a
    stick at, and ... oh yes, I've resumed work on my cRPG for the SE. If
    you feel like helping out the project could some more C developers
    (it's a port and there's C++ source available, but obviously it will
    need some rework to get a C version that fits into 256K with all the
    data).

  4. Re: Eep

    Usenet groups do not die. The creator of said system never bothered with a
    remove command.

    Brian

    --
    Brian Gaff - briang1@blueyonder.co.uk
    Note:- In order to reduce spam, any email without 'Brian Gaff'
    in the display name may be lost.
    Blind user, so no pictures please!
    "InkyFeet" wrote in message
    news:1fab39ad-6466-4526-a4fe-26d7a6ff6700@l28g2000prd.googlegroups.com...
    >I thought CSS had died yonks ago, but here it still is wibbling away.
    >
    > Sought it out because I can't get the WOS forums at work for some
    > reason, and I've started fiddling around with speccies again.
    >
    > Well... hello then from Australia once more.
    >
    > Warm me a Toastrack 128, I'll be back for breakfast.
    >
    > Jeff B




  5. Re: Eep

    Brian Gaff wrote:

    > Usenet groups do not die. The creator of said system never bothered
    > with a remove command.
    >
    > Brian


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cancel_message#rmgroup

    ....or we could just see what happens when I flick this big red switch
    labelled "The Internet" to the off posi

  6. Re: Eep


    "Slower Than You" wrote ...

    > Brian Gaff wrote:
    >
    >> Usenet groups do not die. The creator of said system never bothered
    >> with a remove command.
    >>
    >> Brian

    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cancel_message#rmgroup
    >
    > ...or we could just see what happens when I flick this big red switch
    > labelled "The Internet" to the off posi


    Shirley you jest.

    I don't know if it is color coded red or not. That is highly classified
    information. However, in the caverns deep below the Pentagon is a switch.
    If someone throws it, all sites that are not blessed with a .mil address are
    no longer accessible. I'll bet that includes your ISP's servers and the
    server you get Usenet messages from for most of you. :-) Imagine life
    without email. It could happen tomorrow. No more spam!
    --
    Best regards,

    Sam Gillett

    Change is inevitable,
    except from vending machines!




  7. Re: Eep

    Sam Gillett wrote:
    > I don't know if it is color coded red or not. That is highly classified
    > information. However, in the caverns deep below the Pentagon is a switch.
    > If someone throws it, all sites that are not blessed with a .mil address are
    > no longer accessible. I'll bet that includes your ISP's servers and the
    > server you get Usenet messages from for most of you. :-) Imagine life
    > without email. It could happen tomorrow. No more spam!


    It might take down the US network... IFF all the root servers abide by the
    kill switch... But the whole world? I'm pretty sure someone would quickly
    activate a backup set of root domain servers outside the USA.

    And it wouldn't affect country specific TDLs like .uk, .fr, .de, etc...
    --
    | spike1@freenet.co.uk | |
    | Andrew Halliwell BSc | "The day Microsoft makes something that doesn't |
    | in | suck is probably the day they start making |
    | Computer science | vacuum cleaners" - Ernst Jan Plugge |

  8. Re: Eep

    Andrew Halliwell wrote:
    > Sam Gillett wrote:
    >> I don't know if it is color coded red or not. That is highly classified
    >> information. However, in the caverns deep below the Pentagon is a switch.
    >> If someone throws it, all sites that are not blessed with a .mil address are
    >> no longer accessible. I'll bet that includes your ISP's servers and the
    >> server you get Usenet messages from for most of you. :-) Imagine life
    >> without email. It could happen tomorrow. No more spam!

    >
    > It might take down the US network... IFF all the root servers abide by the
    > kill switch... But the whole world? I'm pretty sure someone would quickly
    > activate a backup set of root domain servers outside the USA.
    >
    > And it wouldn't affect country specific TDLs like .uk, .fr, .de, etc...


    I think it would make "all sites that are not blessed with a .mil
    address are no longer accessible. I'll bet that includes your ISP's
    servers and the server you get Usenet messages from for most of you."

    buuuut only for people INSIDE the pentagon!

  9. Re: Eep

    The Internet is designed to be able to withstand attacks on it.
    Routers might need to be reconfigured to ignore the kill signal but a
    deliberate blackout of sites would last probably 24 hours at most.

  10. Re: Eep

    Sam Gillett wrote:

    >
    > "Slower Than You" wrote ...
    >
    > > Brian Gaff wrote:
    > >
    > > > Usenet groups do not die. The creator of said system never
    > > > bothered with a remove command.
    > > >
    > > > Brian

    > >
    > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cancel_message#rmgroup
    > >
    > > ...or we could just see what happens when I flick this big red
    > > switch labelled "The Internet" to the off posi

    >
    > Shirley you jest.
    >
    > I don't know if it is color coded red or not. That is highly
    > classified information. However, in the caverns deep below the
    > Pentagon is a switch. If someone throws it, all sites that are not
    > blessed with a .mil address are no longer accessible. I'll bet that
    > includes your ISP's servers and the server you get Usenet messages
    > from for most of you. :-) Imagine life without email. It could
    > happen tomorrow. No more spam!


    Is that in the same caverns where they keep all the recovered alien
    spaceships?
    --
    Slower Than You

  11. Re: Eep

    On Thu, 3 Jul 2008 09:03:55 +0100, Andrew Halliwell
    wrote:

    >
    >It might take down the US network... IFF all the root servers abide by the
    >kill switch... But the whole world? I'm pretty sure someone would quickly
    >activate a backup set of root domain servers outside the USA.
    >


    Yeah, got it on a c90 somewhere

  12. Re: Eep

    Lister wrote:

    > On Thu, 3 Jul 2008 09:03:55 +0100, Andrew Halliwell
    > wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > It might take down the US network... IFF all the root servers abide
    > > by the kill switch... But the whole world? I'm pretty sure someone
    > > would quickly activate a backup set of root domain servers outside
    > > the USA.
    > >

    >
    > Yeah, got it on a c90 somewhere


    ....they have it on cd burning... (29y old backup, though ;-))


  13. Re: Eep


    "Andrew Halliwell" wrote ...

    > Sam Gillett wrote:
    >> I don't know if it is color coded red or not. That is highly classified
    >> information. However, in the caverns deep below the Pentagon is a switch.
    >> If someone throws it, all sites that are not blessed with a .mil address
    >> are no longer accessible. I'll bet that includes your ISP's servers and
    >> the server you get Usenet messages from for most of you. :-) Imagine
    >> life without email. It could happen tomorrow. No more spam!

    >
    > It might take down the US network... IFF all the root servers abide by the
    > kill switch... But the whole world? I'm pretty sure someone would quickly
    > activate a backup set of root domain servers outside the USA.


    Remember where the internet came from. It was designed to be, among other
    things, very secure. Right now it is operating in unsecured mode, or you
    would not be reading this. If it goes to secure mode, the servers you speak
    of will not be able to access the backbone without the necessary permissions.
    They can have a lot of fun talking to themselves!
    --
    Best regards,

    Sam Gillett

    Change is inevitable,
    except from vending machines!




  14. Re: Eep


    "Slower Than You" wrote in message
    news:xn0fs8lt1581dnx000@news.clara.net...
    > Sam Gillett wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> "Slower Than You" wrote ...
    >>
    >> > Brian Gaff wrote:
    >> >
    >> > > Usenet groups do not die. The creator of said system never
    >> > > bothered with a remove command.
    >> > >
    >> > > Brian
    >> >
    >> > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cancel_message#rmgroup
    >> >
    >> > ...or we could just see what happens when I flick this big red
    >> > switch labelled "The Internet" to the off posi

    >>
    >> Shirley you jest.
    >>
    >> I don't know if it is color coded red or not. That is highly
    >> classified information. However, in the caverns deep below the
    >> Pentagon is a switch. If someone throws it, all sites that are not
    >> blessed with a .mil address are no longer accessible. I'll bet that
    >> includes your ISP's servers and the server you get Usenet messages
    >> from for most of you. :-) Imagine life without email. It could
    >> happen tomorrow. No more spam!

    >
    > Is that in the same caverns where they keep all the recovered alien
    > spaceships?


    I could be wrong about this but I think those caverns were in New Mexico.
    Where they were moved to, I have no idea. They may be under an antenna array
    somewhere so that the communications equipment that was recovered can be used
    to talk to alien spacecraft that have not crashed yet.

    Or maybe they can be used to talk to the Russian project for recovered alien
    technology. :-)
    --
    Best regards,

    Sam Gillett

    UFO's are real.
    It's the Air Force that doesn't exist!



  15. Re: Eep

    Sam Gillett wrote:

    >
    > "Slower Than You" wrote in message
    > news:xn0fs8lt1581dnx000@news.clara.net...
    > > Sam Gillett wrote:
    > >
    > > >
    > >>"Slower Than You" wrote ...
    > > >
    > >>> Brian Gaff wrote:
    > > > >
    > >>> > Usenet groups do not die. The creator of said system never
    > >>> > bothered with a remove command.
    > >>> >
    > >>> > Brian
    > > > >
    > >>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cancel_message#rmgroup
    > > > >
    > >>> ...or we could just see what happens when I flick this big red
    > >>> switch labelled "The Internet" to the off posi
    > > >
    > > > Shirley you jest.
    > > >
    > > > I don't know if it is color coded red or not. That is highly
    > > > classified information. However, in the caverns deep below the
    > > > Pentagon is a switch. If someone throws it, all sites that are
    > > > not blessed with a .mil address are no longer accessible. I'll
    > > > bet that includes your ISP's servers and the server you get
    > > > Usenet messages from for most of you. :-) Imagine life
    > > > without email. It could happen tomorrow. No more spam!

    > >
    > > Is that in the same caverns where they keep all the recovered alien
    > > spaceships?

    >
    > I could be wrong about this but I think those caverns were in New
    > Mexico. Where they were moved to, I have no idea.


    Damn it, you're our man on the inside. You are supposed to know the
    answers to this stuff.

    > They may be under
    > an antenna array somewhere so that the communications equipment that
    > was recovered can be used to talk to alien spacecraft that have not
    > crashed yet.
    >
    > Or maybe they can be used to talk to the Russian project for
    > recovered alien technology. :-)


    The original source of the Russian's amazing technological advances was
    Cambridge, England, not outer space.
    --
    Slower Than You

  16. Re: Eep


    "Slower Than You" wrote ...

    > Sam Gillett wrote:
    >
    >> They may be under an antenna array somewhere so that the communications
    >> equipment that was recovered can be used to talk to alien spacecraft that
    >> have not crashed yet.
    >>
    >> Or maybe they can be used to talk to the Russian project for
    >> recovered alien technology. :-)

    >
    > The original source of the Russian's amazing technological advances was
    > Cambridge, England, not outer space.


    Is Cambridge where the British keep their recovered alien spacecraft?

    --
    Best regards,

    Sam Gillett

    UFO's are real.
    It's the Air Force that doesn't exist!




  17. Re: Eep

    Owenbot wrote:
    > Long time no see cobber. How's life in Brizzy? Lots has been going on
    > while you've been absent but maybe you've been lurking on WoS and seen
    > all the updates. If not then there's Winston's Ethernet project, Chris
    > Smith's Harlequin SE project (which I'm looking forward to getting
    > hold of as the SE prototype has died), more games than you can shake a
    > stick at, and ... oh yes, I've resumed work on my cRPG for the SE. If
    > you feel like helping out the project could some more C developers
    > (it's a port and there's C++ source available, but obviously it will
    > need some rework to get a C version that fits into 256K with all the
    > data).


    Life in Brizzy isn't too bad - since I was last here I've been engaged
    again (yes, you did detect the past tense), got a new car, been in a
    band, a duo and am now solo again (if interested check out
    Starlingfall on myspace.com)

    I didn't get much from the WoS forum before it became unavailable at
    work sadly, I saw the link to the new game with the skeleton which I
    though was exceptionally good (but I'm afraid I didn't note the name
    or author). I've not seen anything about the ethernet or harlequin SE
    project - though I did try to find the SpeccyBob pages the other day
    as one of my colleagues has a PAL/GAL/EPROM programmer and is looking
    for projects (and I'm allowed to borrow it too, so I'm getting back on
    some hardware stuff myself...)

    Nothing quite as exciting as the old Loki design (not at this stage).
    First draft will have a "proper key" keyboard, built-in SD card based
    MP3 player as a replacement to a tapedeck, and a compact flash
    interface (I'm still working out which version I'm going to build).
    After that I'll look at memory expansion, clock speeds, screen modes
    etc (especially if I can find my old logic diagrams and the speccybob
    circuits) .. and of course I might just be content with what I have
    after stage one (in the past I've spent too long looking at
    possibilities and then run out of interest before getting the
    soldering iron out)

    I'm looking forward to checking out the new games and hardware
    diagrams etc etc.

    Oh, at the risk of looking like a vulture. if the SE's broken, do you
    still have the parts?

  18. Re: Eep

    Sam Gillett wrote:
    >> It might take down the US network... IFF all the root servers abide by the
    >> kill switch... But the whole world? I'm pretty sure someone would quickly
    >> activate a backup set of root domain servers outside the USA.

    >
    > Remember where the internet came from. It was designed to be, among other
    > things, very secure. Right now it is operating in unsecured mode, or you
    > would not be reading this. If it goes to secure mode, the servers you speak
    > of will not be able to access the backbone without the necessary permissions.
    > They can have a lot of fun talking to themselves!


    It was also designed to be massively redundant and routable. A large
    section drops out, it'll route around the blockage. The USA might lock down
    but the USA doesn't own the internet and all the internet service providers
    outside the USA can ignore the "switch to secure mode" and go on as normal.

    Only the US sites will go down. And most large companies have internet
    domains on .com AND in other countries.

    If we lose the "backbone", the internet will form a new backbone.
    --
    | spike1@freenet.co,uk | "Are you pondering what I'm pondering Pinky?" |
    | Andrew Halliwell BSc | |
    | in | "I think so brain, but this time, you control |
    | Computer Science | the Encounter suit, and I'll do the voice..." |

  19. Re: Eep

    Sam Gillett wrote:
    >> The original source of the Russian's amazing technological advances was
    >> Cambridge, England, not outer space.

    >
    > Is Cambridge where the British keep their recovered alien spacecraft?
    >


    No, it's where the british spies got recruited who shipped all your alien
    spaceship intel to the ruskies.
    :-p
    --
    | spike1@freenet.co.uk | Windows95 (noun): 32 bit extensions and a |
    | | graphical shell for a 16 bit patch to an 8 bit |
    | Andrew Halliwell BSc | operating system originally coded for a 4 bit |
    | in |microprocessor, written by a 2 bit company, that|
    | Computer Science | can't stand 1 bit of competition. |

  20. Re: Eep

    On 2008-07-04, Andrew Halliwell wrote:

    > It was also designed to be massively redundant and routable. A large
    > section drops out, it'll route around the blockage. The USA might lock down
    > but the USA doesn't own the internet and all the internet service providers
    > outside the USA can ignore the "switch to secure mode" and go on as normal.


    Plus of course, there's no "secure mode".. Or even "the internet" for
    that matter. An internet is a connection between two or more
    networks, that's where "it" gets its name, there's no one single
    "internet" and so no possible overall control as it's a large
    co-operatively run shambles using different hardware, technologies and
    vendors, and it doesn't even need to work on TCP/IP, it used to run
    across a load of different networking techonlogies and still can, as
    long as there are gateways from one to the other. When IPv6 starts
    taking off more there will be (and will already be) parts of "the
    internet" that run on IPv6. How is there a "secure mode" that works
    across all of this?

    --
    Blast off and strike the evil Bydo empire!
    http://youtube.com/user/tarcus69
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/tarcus/sets/

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