Our Survey Said... - Sinclair

This is a discussion on Our Survey Said... - Sinclair ; aOn 2008-04-21, BruceMcF wrote: > Brazil, run it in Brazil. Finally, MSX will get the recognition it > deserves {evil laugh} From what I saw, MSX already got the recognition it deserved! They got 2 mentions by Fred on Micro ...

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Thread: Our Survey Said...

  1. Re: Our Survey Said...

    aOn 2008-04-21, BruceMcF wrote:

    > Brazil, run it in Brazil. Finally, MSX will get the recognition it
    > deserves {evil laugh}


    From what I saw, MSX already got the recognition it deserved! They
    got 2 mentions by Fred on Micro Live, what more could they expect,
    damned foreigners..

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  2. Re: Our Survey Said...

    In news:480d2ea8$0$632$9b4e6d93@newsspool1.arcor-online.net,
    Linards Ticmanis wrote:

    > The real all-time top acts over here are Die Toten Hosen...


    I haven't heard of them (complacent American that I am), but I like the name
    .

    Brian
    --



  3. Re: Our Survey Said...

    In news:slrng0nibm.oja.news06@desktop.tarcus.org.uk,
    Ian Rawlings wrote:

    > "Topical" doesn't mean the latest thing in the mindless
    > celebrity culture that you commodore users gravitate towards...


    I know, it's terrible! Richard Branson invites us over for the weekend and
    sends a plane around to pick us up, which is fine, but then we run into all
    those people and it's off to the races again...

    Brian
    --



  4. Re: Our Survey Said...

    On Apr 20, 6:41 pm, OwenBot wrote:
    > On Apr 20, 10:48 pm, "Klompmeester" wrote:
    >
    > > Slap a "made in the UK" sticker on anything and the brits will proclaim it
    > > to be the best.

    >
    > I've never met anyone in the UK that thought British stuff was the
    > best. Adequate is usually the description. We buy it out of a
    > misplaced sense of loyalty and national pride in the same way that the
    > French buy French cars and the Germans buy German pop music. The
    > Americans, I notice, don't buy American anymore.


    Americans "bought America", first, in the aftermath of WWII when the
    US had such a massive lead in R&D and capital equipment that stuff
    Made in the US was likely to be the best, and then after that faded
    (which took some decades), because advertisements told us to "Buy
    American". I went away to OZ for a decade, when I came back, those
    adverts were gone.

    Indeed, the above is probably why they *didn't* ask "which was the
    King of the 1980's home computers" ... as the right demographic in the
    UK "which was your first home computer" and the results are far safer.

  5. Re: Our Survey Said...

    OwenBot wrote in news:

    > I've never met anyone in the UK that thought British stuff was the
    > best. Adequate is usually the description. We buy it out of a
    > misplaced sense of loyalty and national pride in the same way that the
    > French buy French cars and the Germans buy German pop music. The
    > Americans, I notice, don't buy American anymore.


    It's rather hard to do that when one cannot find a kitchen appliance or a
    stereo or a TV that's American-made.


  6. Re: Our Survey Said...

    On Mon, 21 Apr 2008 18:54:12 +0100, Duncan Snowden
    wrote:

    >Geoff Wearmouth wrote:
    >
    >> Flamewar? I was merely disseminating topical information. :-)
    >>
    >> Talking of the Guiness Book of Records, the British Broadcasting
    >> Corporation reports that in Wales this weekend there has been the
    >> biggest assembly of Sir Clive Sinclair's C5 electric tricycle
    >>
    >> http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/wales/south_east/7354449.stm
    >>
    >> It does give one a warm feeling.

    >
    >In the small of the back, roughly where the motor is? Could be nasty.



    Has one ever been driven from Land's End to John O'Groats?

  7. Re: Our Survey Said...

    On Tue, 22 Apr 2008 17:37:01 +0100 da kidz on comp.sys.sinclair were rappin'
    to MC Lister:

    > On Mon, 21 Apr 2008 18:54:12 +0100, Duncan Snowden
    > wrote:
    >
    > >Geoff Wearmouth wrote:
    > >
    > >> Flamewar? I was merely disseminating topical information. :-)
    > >>
    > >> Talking of the Guiness Book of Records, the British Broadcasting
    > >> Corporation reports that in Wales this weekend there has been the
    > >> biggest assembly of Sir Clive Sinclair's C5 electric tricycle
    > >>
    > >> http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/wales/south_east/7354449.stm
    > >>
    > >> It does give one a warm feeling.

    > >
    > >In the small of the back, roughly where the motor is? Could be nasty.

    >
    >
    > Has one ever been driven from Land's End to John O'Groats?


    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/o...re/4169051.stm

    I don't know whether he managed it - IIRC he has posted in c.s.s. in
    the past.

    Chris


    --
    +-------------------------------------------+
    | Unsatisfactory Software - "because it is" |
    | http://www.unsatisfactorysoftware.co.uk |
    | Your Sinclair: A Celebration |
    +- http://www.yoursinclair.co.uk -----------+

    DISCLAIMER: I may be making all this stuff up again.

  8. Re: Our Survey Said...

    On Tue, 22 Apr 2008 03:58:41 -0400 da kidz on comp.sys.sinclair were rappin'
    to MC Brian Ketterling:

    > > The real all-time top acts over here are Die Toten Hosen...

    >
    > I haven't heard of them (complacent American that I am), but I like the name
    > .


    They even made Guitar Hero 3, so they must be good. I guess the C64
    version (Shredz64 or whatever it's called) didn't feature that track.

    Chris


    --
    +-------------------------------------------+
    | Unsatisfactory Software - "because it is" |
    | http://www.unsatisfactorysoftware.co.uk |
    | Your Sinclair: A Celebration |
    +- http://www.yoursinclair.co.uk -----------+

    DISCLAIMER: I may be making all this stuff up again.

  9. Re: Our Survey Said...

    On 22 Apr 2008 18:54:09 +0100, "Chris Young"
    wrote:

    >On Tue, 22 Apr 2008 17:37:01 +0100 da kidz on comp.sys.sinclair were rappin'
    >to MC Lister:
    >
    >> On Mon, 21 Apr 2008 18:54:12 +0100, Duncan Snowden
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >> >Geoff Wearmouth wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> Flamewar? I was merely disseminating topical information. :-)
    >> >>
    >> >> Talking of the Guiness Book of Records, the British Broadcasting
    >> >> Corporation reports that in Wales this weekend there has been the
    >> >> biggest assembly of Sir Clive Sinclair's C5 electric tricycle
    >> >>
    >> >> http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/wales/south_east/7354449.stm
    >> >>
    >> >> It does give one a warm feeling.
    >> >
    >> >In the small of the back, roughly where the motor is? Could be nasty.

    >>
    >>
    >> Has one ever been driven from Land's End to John O'Groats?

    >
    >http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/o...re/4169051.stm
    >
    >I don't know whether he managed it - IIRC he has posted in c.s.s. in
    >the past.
    >
    >Chris



    Bah, forgot about that

    If he hasn't managed it, though, I'll do it

  10. Re: Our Survey Said...

    On Apr 20, 8:53 am, Geoff Wearmouth wrote:
    > We asked over 900 people "Which is the king of computers?"
    >
    > http://hardware.silicon.com/desktops...678,00.htm?r=1
    >
    > It was a given really.
    >
    > --
    > G.


    Very interesting. But outside Europe, the Spectrum is practically
    unknown (and this coming from a Spectrum fanatic). But it's not just
    the Spectrum that's unknown. I've been living in the U.S. since 95.
    I've lived in New York, New Jersey, Florida and California, and I've
    never met someone who was an active 8-bit computer user, be it
    Sinclair or Commodore. It's easy to find groups of people online, but
    not in person. In 13 years I've only met a few people who vaguely
    remembered those computers. Most of them remembered the TRS-80 and
    Apple 1. I think that the U.S. , being a big country, made it
    difficult for 8-bit communities to survive. They tried newsletters,
    BBS, etc. but it wasn't enough. Even if I look online, there's only a
    handful of people in the U.S. who follow the cult of 8-bit computing
    as enthusiastically as the guys in Europe. I don't think 8-bit
    computers had the same cultural, sentimental impact here as they did
    in Europe.

  11. Re: Our Survey Said...

    On 22 Apr, 16:12, nem wrote:
    > OwenBot wrote in news:


    > > Americans, I notice, don't buy American anymore.


    > It's rather hard to do that when one cannot find a kitchen appliance or a
    > stereo or a TV that's American-made.


    Of course, in the UK we still have Roberts radios and Aga ovens:

    http://www.robertsradio.co.uk/
    http://www.aga-rayburn.co.uk/

    On the other hand I don't know anyone who owns one.

  12. Re: Our Survey Said...

    On Apr 23, 3:58 am, zxbruno wrote:
    > I've lived in New York, New Jersey, Florida and California, and I've
    > never met someone who was an active 8-bit computer user, be it
    > Sinclair or Commodore.


    The C64 was one of the bigger fish in the pond in American home
    computers in the early 1980's ... but it was a very small pond,
    compared to today.

  13. Re: Our Survey Said...

    zxbruno wrote in news:

    > Very interesting. But outside Europe, the Spectrum is practically
    > unknown (and this coming from a Spectrum fanatic).


    Here in America our experience of Sinclairs is pretty much limited to
    the TS-1000. I'd hardly even consider that a real computer. My local
    flea market has a ton of Commodore stuff, though. You'd love it. The
    only machine I've never seen there was a B-series, but they only sold
    about 15,000 of those, so what are the odds of seeing one?

    > But it's not just
    > the Spectrum that's unknown. I've been living in the U.S. since 95.
    > I've lived in New York, New Jersey, Florida and California, and I've
    > never met someone who was an active 8-bit computer user, be it
    > Sinclair or Commodore. It's easy to find groups of people online, but
    > not in person. In 13 years I've only met a few people who vaguely
    > remembered those computers. Most of them remembered the TRS-80 and
    > Apple 1. I think that the U.S. , being a big country, made it
    > difficult for 8-bit communities to survive. They tried newsletters,
    > BBS, etc. but it wasn't enough.


    I've met some people. There was a dealer at a computer show I went to
    who was talking about going on BBSs with his C64. And another guy who
    said his first computer was a TS-1000.

    > Even if I look online, there's only a
    > handful of people in the U.S. who follow the cult of 8-bit computing
    > as enthusiastically as the guys in Europe. I don't think 8-bit
    > computers had the same cultural, sentimental impact here as they did
    > in Europe.


    8-bits lasted much longer in Europe than in the US. When you think of
    NTSC C64 games, you mainly think of Broderbund, Synapse, and Epyx. I'd
    say that here 8-bit computers reached their zenith in 1982 and then
    started to give way to 16-bits. By 1987, PCs, Amigas, and Macs were
    dominate. Of course the C64 was still going fairly strong. Maniac
    Mansion and Zak McKracken were from that time period. And the C64 port
    of the Simpsons arcade game was done in 1991. That was pretty good, but
    there never was a true NTSC equivalent of say, Mayhem in Monsterland.

  14. Re: Our Survey Said...

    On Wed, 23 Apr 2008 06:25:32 -0700 (PDT) da kidz on comp.sys.sinclair were rappin'
    to MC OwenBot:

    > Of course, in the UK we still have Roberts radios and Aga ovens:
    >
    > http://www.robertsradio.co.uk/
    > http://www.aga-rayburn.co.uk/
    >
    > On the other hand I don't know anyone who owns one.


    I have a Roberts radio (actually it's a clock alarm radio thingy, but
    same difference), and their DAB units are pretty popular by all
    accounts.

    On the other hand, this is the first I've heard of Aga ovens.

    Our games industry is still pretty big though (he says, desperately
    trying to steer things back on topic)

    Chris


    --
    +-------------------------------------------+
    | Unsatisfactory Software - "because it is" |
    | http://www.unsatisfactorysoftware.co.uk |
    | Your Sinclair: A Celebration |
    +- http://www.yoursinclair.co.uk -----------+

    DISCLAIMER: I may be making all this stuff up again.

  15. Re: Our Survey Said...

    Chris Young wrote:
    > On Wed, 23 Apr 2008 06:25:32 -0700 (PDT) da kidz on comp.sys.sinclair were rappin'
    > to MC OwenBot:
    >
    >> Of course, in the UK we still have Roberts radios and Aga ovens:
    >>
    >> http://www.robertsradio.co.uk/
    >> http://www.aga-rayburn.co.uk/
    >>
    >> On the other hand I don't know anyone who owns one.

    >
    > I have a Roberts radio (actually it's a clock alarm radio thingy, but
    > same difference), and their DAB units are pretty popular by all
    > accounts.
    >
    > On the other hand, this is the first I've heard of Aga ovens.
    >
    > Our games industry is still pretty big though (he says, desperately
    > trying to steer things back on topic)
    >
    > Chris
    >
    >

    yup, I've got a Roberts. It's a travel radio one, FM, MW, LW, SW

  16. Re: Our Survey Said...

    On Apr 23, 3:16 pm, Guesser wrote:
    > yup, I've got a Roberts. It's a travel radio one, FM, MW, LW, SW


    Is it as good as a Grundig?

  17. Re: Our Survey Said...

    On 23 Apr 2008 19:06:44 +0100, "Chris Young"
    wrote:

    >On Wed, 23 Apr 2008 06:25:32 -0700 (PDT) da kidz on comp.sys.sinclair were rappin'
    >to MC OwenBot:
    >
    >> Of course, in the UK we still have Roberts radios and Aga ovens:
    >>
    >> http://www.robertsradio.co.uk/
    >> http://www.aga-rayburn.co.uk/
    >>
    >> On the other hand I don't know anyone who owns one.

    >
    >I have a Roberts radio (actually it's a clock alarm radio thingy, but
    >same difference), and their DAB units are pretty popular by all
    >accounts.
    >
    >On the other hand, this is the first I've heard of Aga ovens.
    >


    My uncle has an aga

  18. Re: Our Survey Said...


    "Linards Ticmanis" wrote in message
    news:480d2ea8$0$632$9b4e6d93@newsspool1.arcor-online.net...
    > Andrew Halliwell wrote:
    >> Paul E Collins wrote:
    >>> "OwenBot" wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> in the same way that the French buy French cars and the Germans buy
    >>>> German pop music.
    >>> German pop music is *excellent*.

    >>
    >> Then why is Germany the only country in the world that thinks david
    >> hasslehoff is a pop star?

    >
    > The people who think this correspond to those in the U.S. who listen
    > exclusively to phony "Country" Music. Every nation has its share of those,
    > but anybody over here with a bit of taste hates Hasselhoff as a Musician
    > (and as an actor I might say).
    >
    > Same goes for "Modern Talking" (aaaarrrrgggghhhh), and most of the
    > "successful exports" such as The Scorpions. Urgh. The real all-time top
    > acts over here are Die Toten Hosen, Die Ärzte, and Herbert Grönemeyer, all
    > eminently listenable. For some decent newer stuff check out Wir Sind
    > Helden. For raw musical power (though questionable lyrics) try the old Ton
    > Steine Scherben stuff, and for a taste of GDR "East Rock", try "City".
    >
    > Stonk!
    > --


    I like Rammstein and have a few of their CD's and I also like Blof and some
    Guus Meeuwis from the Netherlands :-) Every country has local acts that may
    make it big in their own country and are good bands in their own right but
    don't make an impact overseas.

    How many Australian bands that have enjoyed major international success can
    you name off the top of your head?








  19. Re: Our Survey Said...

    In article ,
    Klompmeester wrote:
    >
    >I like Rammstein and have a few of their CD's and I also like Blof and some
    >Guus Meeuwis from the Netherlands :-) Every country has local acts that may
    >make it big in their own country and are good bands in their own right but
    >don't make an impact overseas.
    >
    >How many Australian bands that have enjoyed major international success can
    >you name off the top of your head?


    Ooh, a challenge. How about

    INXS
    Crowded House
    Midnight Oil
    AC/DC
    Men At Work
    Jimmy Barnes (was famous a few years ago)
    Cold Chisel (not really famous here, but I like them)

    Most of the above acts are from the 80's. I'm not familiar with any new
    ones.

    PS.


  20. Re: Our Survey Said...


    "Peter Schepers" wrote in message
    news:futuqm$9it$1@rumours.uwaterloo.ca...
    > In article ,
    > Klompmeester wrote:
    >>
    >>I like Rammstein and have a few of their CD's and I also like Blof and
    >>some
    >>Guus Meeuwis from the Netherlands :-) Every country has local acts that
    >>may
    >>make it big in their own country and are good bands in their own right but
    >>don't make an impact overseas.
    >>
    >>How many Australian bands that have enjoyed major international success
    >>can
    >>you name off the top of your head?

    >
    > Ooh, a challenge. How about
    >
    > INXS
    > Crowded House
    > Midnight Oil
    > AC/DC
    > Men At Work
    > Jimmy Barnes (was famous a few years ago)
    > Cold Chisel (not really famous here, but I like them)


    If you like them you may also like Australian Crawl, another huge band
    locally in the early eighties.

    > Most of the above acts are from the 80's. I'm not familiar with any new
    > ones.
    >


    Some others you may have heard of...

    Savage Garden
    Kylie Minogue
    Powderfinger
    Ben Lee
    Nick Cave
    Spiderbait





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