Bloody Google again... - Sinclair

This is a discussion on Bloody Google again... - Sinclair ; Biggo did eloquently scribble: > Duncan Snowden wrote: >> Or an episode of Star Trek where they're all evil and have beards. > My favourite (1) is the one where Kirk crawls around with a dwarf on his > back ...

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Thread: Bloody Google again...

  1. Re: Bloody Google again...

    Biggo did eloquently scribble:
    > Duncan Snowden wrote:


    >> Or an episode of Star Trek where they're all evil and have beards.


    > My favourite (1) is the one where Kirk crawls around with a dwarf on his
    > back while Spock plays lyre and sings a romantic song for the pleasure
    > of the local emperor o_O


    > (1) Read: worst Star Trek episode *evah*


    You forgot it also included the first inter-racial kiss on american
    television. (Between kirk and uhuru)
    --
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  2. Re: Bloody Google again...

    Bohus Král wrote:

    > That's right, but still, let's remain in water pipe :
    > There is a 10km long water pipe. In the middle of it there is one molecule
    > of H2O (5km from left, 5km from right. We push a pump. Till the information
    > comes to this molecule, that something is pushing it from left (5km) and
    > something is pulling it from right (5km), there must pass some time.


    Exactly. That molecule receives the information almost immediately, and
    in double that time a molecule at the far right will be pushed. Both
    molecules, though, are still in place (assuming that the last molecule
    didn't fall out of the pipe).
    It's the same with electricity: information, the "pushing" of electrons,
    travels at almost-light speed, but the electrons themselves don't move
    (or do it *very* slowly).

    --
    | ||_ (o) __ __ __ | Biggo. Strattinare
    | |'o\| |/o \/o \/o \ | Se/quando c'e', c'e'
    | |._/|_|\__/\__/\__/ |
    | /_/ /_/ | *Si vis pacem, para papunzi

  3. Re: Bloody Google again...

    wrote:

    > Biggo did eloquently scribble:
    > > My favourite (1) is the one where Kirk crawls around with a dwarf on his
    > > back

    >
    > You forgot it also included the first inter-racial kiss on american
    > television. (Between kirk and uhuru)


    It was THAT episode? Gosh. I, as you say, forgot. Dave... my mind is
    going... I can feel it...

    --
    | ||_ (o) __ __ __ | Biggo. Strattinare
    | |'o\| |/o \/o \/o \ | Se/quando c'e', c'e'
    | |._/|_|\__/\__/\__/ |
    | /_/ /_/ | *Si vis pacem, para papunzi

  4. Re: Bloody Google again...

    On Jan 26, 9:59 am, korax1...@gmail.com wrote:
    > Yesterday I posted a reply (albeit a facetious one) to the "Kicking
    > the bucket" thread. I got the "Your post was successful" indicator
    > but the post is still, several hours later, not showing on Google.
    > Has anyone else received it?
    >
    > This kind of thing makes even the flaky aioe look good...


    I'd just like to say that my, also facetious, post was accepted as an
    offering at the great Google Groups altar. Either Google Groups
    doesn't discriminate against facetiousness, can't spot facetiousness,
    or I can't spot facetiousness.

  5. Re: Bloody Google again...


    "Biggo" wrote ...
    >
    > Exactly. That molecule receives the information almost immediately, and
    > in double that time a molecule at the far right will be pushed. Both
    > molecules, though, are still in place (assuming that the last molecule
    > didn't fall out of the pipe).
    > It's the same with electricity: information, the "pushing" of electrons,
    > travels at almost-light speed, but the electrons themselves don't move
    > (or do it *very* slowly).


    Maybe this paragraph from the Grolier Encyclopedia will shed a little light
    on the subject of electron movement.

    "As electrons bounce along through the wire, the general charge drift
    constitutes the current. The average, or drift, speed is defined as the speed
    the electrons would have if all were moving with constant velocity parallel
    to the field. The drift speed is actually small even in good conductors. In a
    1.0-mm-diameter copper wire carrying a current of 10 amps at room
    temperature, the drift speed of the electrons is 0.2 mm per second. In
    copper, the electrons rarely drift faster than one hundred-billionth the
    speed of light. On the other hand, the speed of the electric signal is the
    speed of light. This means that, at the speed of light, the removal of one
    electron from one end of a long wire would affect electrons elsewhere."
    --
    Best regards,

    Sam Gillett

    Change is inevitable,
    except from vending machines!








  6. Re: Bloody Google again...

    Sam Gillett wrote:

    > Maybe this paragraph from the Grolier Encyclopedia will shed a little light
    > on the subject of electron movement.


    Uhmmm. My explanation seems more understandable to me .-D

    --
    | ||_ (o) __ __ __ | Biggo. Strattinare
    | |'o\| |/o \/o \/o \ | Se/quando c'e', c'e'
    | |._/|_|\__/\__/\__/ |
    | /_/ /_/ | *Si vis pacem, para papunzi

  7. Re: Bloody Google again...


    "Biggo" wrote ...

    > Sam Gillett wrote:
    >
    >> Maybe this paragraph from the Grolier Encyclopedia will shed a little
    >> light
    >> on the subject of electron movement.

    >
    > Uhmmm. My explanation seems more understandable to me .-D


    Basically the article I quoted said the same thing that you said. :-)
    It just went into a little more detail.

    In the example an individual electron would move about 12 mm per minute. To
    go a little farther, if we reduce the diameter of the wire, the electrons
    will move faster. If we decrease the current, the electrons will move
    slower.

    While an electron is not in transit between two atoms, we can say that the
    electron is at rest. At any given moment in time, most of the electrons in
    the wire are at rest, and only a few are actually in transit.

    While any given electron will only travel a few millimeters per minute, it is
    at rest most of the time. During the brief period of time that said electron
    is in transit it will be moving at near the speed of light.

    BTW, I was just kidding when I accused Spike of having lazy electrons, and I
    don't really think electrons can get too stoned to flow properly. :-)
    --
    Best regards,

    Sam Gillett

    Change is inevitable,
    except from vending machines!



  8. Re: Bloody Google again...

    Sam Gillett wrote:

    > "Biggo" wrote ...
    >
    > > Uhmmm. My explanation seems more understandable to me .-D

    >
    > Basically the article I quoted said the same thing that you said. :-)


    But I suffer from a terrible disease (1) that makes me prefer an
    explanation in italian, or written by a non-englishman. On the other
    hand, I am greatly and positively surprised that the Grolier Encyclops
    says the same things that I say. This means that I am more cultivated
    than I think, or that the Grolier doesn't know his electrons from his
    parasites.
    Or that I am the Grolier Encyclopedia, yes, must be something like that.

    (1) DPAIEC - Didn' Pay Attention In English Classes

    --
    | ||_ (o) __ __ __ | Biggo. Strattinare
    | |'o\| |/o \/o \/o \ | Se/quando c'e', c'e'
    | |._/|_|\__/\__/\__/ |
    | /_/ /_/ | *Si vis pacem, para papunzi

  9. Re: Bloody Google again...

    How did this thread mutate into a discussion of electron flow? :-)

    On Jan 29, 2:38 am, big...@dplanet.ch (Biggo) wrote:

    > My favourite (1) is the one where Kirk crawls around with a dwarf on his
    > back while Spock plays lyre and sings a romantic song for the pleasure
    > of the local emperor o_O
    >
    > (1) Read: worst Star Trek episode *evah*


    I must disagree -- the positively worst Star Trek (TOS -- I haven't
    seen any other Trek except the first movie, and can see why fans have
    subtitled the movie "Where Nomad has gone before") is /Turnabout
    Intruder/ (fittingly the very last episode of TOS), which among other
    faults was grossly inconsistent with the way women are treated in
    other episodes (even if the costumes *were* so designed that viewers
    get to see some character's knickers at least once per episode); the
    second-worst was /The Alternate Factor/, the ST:TOS version of one of
    the standard bad-SF plots (essentially the same story was also a /Lost
    in Space/ episode) about a parallel, anti-matter universe but written
    by a scientific illiterate who didn't understand what anti-matter is
    nor how it interacts with matter. (In his version of reality, it
    isn't a case of (for instance) any electron annihilating on contact
    with any positron; for Kirk to be annihilated, he must come into
    contact with Anti-Kirk.)

  10. Re: Bloody Google again...

    wrote:

    > How did this thread mutate into a discussion of electron flow? :-)


    No idea [whistles and tries to go away]

    > it isn't a case of (for instance) any electron annihilating on contact
    > with any positron; for Kirk to be annihilated, he must come into
    > contact with Anti-Kirk.)


    Being no real trekkie, I had the immense luck not to see that episode.
    Maybe this is Duncan's "episode of Star Trek where they're all evil and
    have beards". Uhura? With a beard? Uhm.

    --
    | ||_ (o) __ __ __ | Biggo. Strattinare
    | |'o\| |/o \/o \/o \ | Se/quando c'e', c'e'
    | |._/|_|\__/\__/\__/ |
    | /_/ /_/ | *Si vis pacem, para papunzi

  11. Re: Bloody Google again...

    On 2008-01-30, korax1214@gmail.com wrote:

    > in Space/ episode) about a parallel, anti-matter universe but written
    > by a scientific illiterate who didn't understand what anti-matter is
    > nor how it interacts with matter.


    Hehe, it always makes me chuckle when people criticise shows like Star
    Trek for being scientifically inaccurate on some small matter ;-)

    I'm just glad they get the warp engines, aliens being almost always
    humanoid, stars shooting past the moving ship and all that kind of
    thing right!

    --
    Blast off and strike the evil Bydo empire!

  12. Re: Bloody Google again...

    Biggo did eloquently scribble:
    > wrote:


    >> How did this thread mutate into a discussion of electron flow? :-)


    > No idea [whistles and tries to go away]


    >> it isn't a case of (for instance) any electron annihilating on contact
    >> with any positron; for Kirk to be annihilated, he must come into
    >> contact with Anti-Kirk.)


    > Being no real trekkie, I had the immense luck not to see that episode.
    > Maybe this is Duncan's "episode of Star Trek where they're all evil and
    > have beards". Uhura? With a beard? Uhm.


    Nope, the evil universe one was called "mirror mirror".
    (which had a few follow up episodes in DS9, and a couple of prequels in
    Enterprise...)
    --
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
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  13. Re: Bloody Google again...

    Ian Rawlings did eloquently scribble:
    > On 2008-01-30, korax1214@gmail.com wrote:


    >> in Space/ episode) about a parallel, anti-matter universe but written
    >> by a scientific illiterate who didn't understand what anti-matter is
    >> nor how it interacts with matter.


    > Hehe, it always makes me chuckle when people criticise shows like Star
    > Trek for being scientifically inaccurate on some small matter ;-)


    > I'm just glad they get the warp engines, aliens being almost always
    > humanoid, stars shooting past the moving ship and all that kind of
    > thing right!


    Don't forget the ability to transport matter without a receiver to transport
    to. I won't mention the Heisenberg compensators cos that bit of technobabble
    didn't appear until Next Generation.

    --
    __________________________________________________ ____________________________
    | spike1@freenet.co.uk | |
    |Andrew Halliwell BSc(hons)| "The day Microsoft makes something that doesn't |
    | in | suck is probably the day they start making |
    | Computer science | vacuum cleaners" - Ernst Jan Plugge |
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

  14. Re: Bloody Google again...

    Bohus Král wrote:

    > That's right, but still, let's remain in water pipe :
    > There is a 10km long water pipe. In the middle of it there is one
    > molecule of H2O (5km from left, 5km from right. We push a pump. Till
    > the information comes to this molecule, that something is pushing it
    > from left (5km) and something is pulling it from right (5km), there
    > must pass some time. I believe, that everything is elastic, nothing
    > is absolutely hard, it comes out from structure of atom and the
    > forces within it., I think.
    >
    > B


    Hi Bohus!


    Forget that Water demos... Sam is just crap!



    Best regards,

    Daniel Mandic

  15. Re: Bloody Google again...

    Biggo wrote:

    > Uhm. Shouldn't it be that an electron vibrating in its orbit hits a
    > near electron of the next atom, thus transferring its energy down the
    > wire? I seem to remember something like that from my school days. I
    > wasn't really paying attention when they explained this, that's why I
    > always fry my circuits.


    Hi Biggo!


    Copper Noise. Quantum stuff :-| ...



    Best regards,

    Daniel Mandic

  16. Re: Bloody Google again...


    "Daniel Mandic" wrote ...
    >
    > Hi Bohus!
    >
    >
    > Forget that Water demos... Sam is just crap!


    No, it is just that you are not able to understand even the most basic
    principles of physics, even when you use both of your brain cells Daniel.
    --
    Best regards,

    Sam Gillett

    It looks like your gene
    pool could use a filter!



  17. Re: Bloody Google again...

    Sam Gillett did eloquently scribble:

    > "Daniel Mandic" wrote ...
    >>
    >> Hi Bohus!
    >>
    >>
    >> Forget that Water demos... Sam is just crap!


    > No, it is just that you are not able to understand even the most basic
    > principles of physics, even when you use both of your brain cells Daniel.


    That's because both of his braincells are irrevocably dedicated to the task
    of failing to meaningfully compose english sentences.
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  18. Re: Bloody Google again...

    Sam Gillett wrote:

    > No, it is just that you are not able to understand even the most
    > basic principles of physics, even when you use both of your brain
    > cells Daniel.


    Yeah, Intelligence is not my Strength. But You still suffer trying...

    --


  19. Re: Bloody Google again...


    wrote ...

    > Sam Gillett did eloquently scribble:
    >
    >> "Daniel Mandic" wrote ...
    >>>
    >>> Hi Bohus!
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Forget that Water demos... Sam is just crap!

    >
    >> No, it is just that you are not able to understand even the most basic
    >> principles of physics, even when you use both of your brain cells Daniel.

    >
    > That's because both of his braincells are irrevocably dedicated to the task
    > of failing to meaningfully compose english sentences.


    Before he can construct a meaningful English sentence he is in desperate need
    of something meaningful to say. Too great a task for only two brain cells I
    fear. :-)
    --
    Best regards,

    Sam Gillett

    Change is inevitable,
    except from vending machines!



  20. Re: Bloody Google again...

    Sam Gillett wrote:

    > only two brain cells I fear. :-)


    You grin all the time.... that's the language of stupid.





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