"Freeway Frog" and ML Monitor (from Spectrum ML for AbsoluteBeginner) - Sinclair

This is a discussion on "Freeway Frog" and ML Monitor (from Spectrum ML for AbsoluteBeginner) - Sinclair ; I have a book called "Spectrum Machine Language for the Absolute Beginner" edited by William Tang. It was published by Melbourne House in 1982. The entire book can be downloaded here in pdf format: http://www.worldofspectrum.org/infos...cgi?id=2000363 As an example of how ...

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  1. "Freeway Frog" and ML Monitor (from Spectrum ML for AbsoluteBeginner)

    I have a book called "Spectrum Machine Language for the Absolute
    Beginner" edited by William Tang. It was published by Melbourne House
    in 1982. The entire book can be downloaded here in pdf format:

    http://www.worldofspectrum.org/infos...cgi?id=2000363

    As an example of how to program in assembly there is a game listing
    (in z80 assembly code) called "Freeway Frog." Does anyone know where
    to get the ML listing in text format, or the game itself so that it
    can be played using an emulator? I've done some searching already, but
    I can't find it. There are also some BASIC programs in the book, one
    of them a ML Monitor called "EZ-Code." I'm sure that there are
    probably better monitors than the one included with the book (though a
    link to that one would be neat). What are are some good montors-- and
    I'd want to make sure that they work with the TS 2068?

    Adam

    P.S. A few days ago I cross-posted this message in both the TS2068 and
    the sinclairspectrumusers Yahoo groups in order to hopfully get a
    better response. I never got a reply.

  2. Re: "Freeway Frog" and ML Monitor (from Spectrum ML for AbsoluteBeginner)

    On Dec 5, 9:03 am, ballyal...@hotmail.com wrote:

    > of them a ML Monitor called "EZ-Code." I'm sure that there are
    > probably better monitors than the one included with the book (though a
    > link to that one would be neat). What are are some good montors-- and
    > I'd want to make sure that they work with the TS 2068?


    My favourite assembler on the 2068 was Zeus Assembler, which is
    available on WOS. I think the Spectrum version will work fine on the
    2068 with the exception of printing to the Sinclair/2040 thermal
    printer. I do have the 2068 version of the sw somewhere and it may
    well be available for download from the yahoo group.

    Zeus also has a monitor/disassembler that can be run at the same time
    as the assembler but what I think you really want is the assembler.

    Having said that, you are much better off using cross-assembling tools
    to develop on a PC and test on an emulator. Most recent emulators
    include monitors that allow you to set breakpoints, single-step
    machine code instructions, monitor register values, etc. I use
    Spectaculator but that has a 30-day free trial period only but Spin is
    also very good and in fact comes with more tools such as a built-in
    assembler and a profiler tool (or is that Basin only?). Both are
    Spectrum emulators but unless you plan to call into the ROM all the
    time (not likely) or use the advanced video modes this is not a
    problem. If you are running Linux or some Unix variant, Fuse will get
    you Timex emulation and provide these sorts of tools too.

    For cross-assembler you can use Spin's default assembler but I prefer
    to use external tools as then you can make use of makefiles and other
    goodies. Many people like pasmo and sjasmplus. I prefer z88dk as it
    contains an assembler as well as a C compiler. Use these to assemble
    your program, drag and drop the result into an emulator to see if it
    works or single-step to see where it goes wrong, and then package it
    up for the real thing once that's all done with bin2tap or similar
    tools.

  3. Re: "Freeway Frog" and ML Monitor (from Spectrum ML for AbsoluteBeginner)

    > My favourite assembler on the 2068 was Zeus Assembler, which is
    > available on WOS.


    I've printed your tips out and put it inside the assembly programming
    book.

    > Having said that, you are much better off using cross-assembling tools
    > to develop on a PC and test on an emulator.


    Agreed. I'm also interested in how things were done "back then" too.
    I find it interesting all the work that programmers had to go through
    to get anything done.

    Thanks for the tips.

    Adam

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