Speccy colour palette - Sinclair

This is a discussion on Speccy colour palette - Sinclair ; Is there an accepted standard (closest match) colour palette to replicate the Spectrum's display? Chris -- +-------------------------------------------+ | Unsatisfactory Software - "because it is" | | http://www.unsatisfactorysoftware.co.uk | | Your Sinclair: A Celebration | +- http://www.yoursinclair.co.uk -----------+ DISCLAIMER: I may ...

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Thread: Speccy colour palette

  1. Speccy colour palette

    Is there an accepted standard (closest match) colour palette to
    replicate the Spectrum's display?

    Chris


    --
    +-------------------------------------------+
    | Unsatisfactory Software - "because it is" |
    | http://www.unsatisfactorysoftware.co.uk |
    | Your Sinclair: A Celebration |
    +- http://www.yoursinclair.co.uk -----------+

    DISCLAIMER: I may be making all this stuff up again.

  2. Re: Speccy colour palette

    I'd say the standard colour bars are as good as any. There is bright and
    dull, and I'm sure I read how this was achieved somewhere...

    Cue argument over Bright black again...

    Brian

    --
    Brian Gaff - briang1@blueyonder.co.uk
    Note:- In order to reduce spam, any email without 'Brian Gaff'
    in the display name may be lost.
    "Chris Young" wrote in message
    news:46080743.MD-1.4.17.chris.young@unsatisfactorysoftware.co.uk...
    > Is there an accepted standard (closest match) colour palette to
    > replicate the Spectrum's display?
    >
    > Chris
    >
    >
    > --
    > +-------------------------------------------+
    > | Unsatisfactory Software - "because it is" |
    > | http://www.unsatisfactorysoftware.co.uk |
    > | Your Sinclair: A Celebration |
    > +- http://www.yoursinclair.co.uk -----------+
    >
    > DISCLAIMER: I may be making all this stuff up again.




  3. Re: Speccy colour palette

    That only helps if I have a Speccy to compare it against :-)

    What I'm really asking, if which of the many emulators and other
    utilities that include a Spectrum palette has the most accurate colour
    reproduction, and what are the hex values?

    The bars are called up by holding down QAZPLM (and another key - space
    or enter?) while resetting. You need about six hands to achieve this.

    You're right about bright black, I'd forgotten the arguments this
    causes.

    Chris

    On Mon, 26 Mar 2007 18:08:05 GMT da kidz on comp.sys.sinclair were rappin'
    to MC Brian Gaff:

    > I'd say the standard colour bars are as good as any. There is bright and
    > dull, and I'm sure I read how this was achieved somewhere...
    >
    > Cue argument over Bright black again...
    >
    > Brian



    --
    +-------------------------------------------+
    | Unsatisfactory Software - "because it is" |
    | http://www.unsatisfactorysoftware.co.uk |
    | Your Sinclair: A Celebration |
    +- http://www.yoursinclair.co.uk -----------+

    DISCLAIMER: I may be making all this stuff up again.

  4. Re: Speccy colour palette

    Chris Young wrote:
    > That only helps if I have a Speccy to compare it against :-)
    >
    > What I'm really asking, if which of the many emulators and other
    > utilities that include a Spectrum palette has the most accurate colour
    > reproduction, and what are the hex values?
    >
    > The bars are called up by holding down QAZPLM (and another key - space
    > or enter?) while resetting. You need about six hands to achieve this.


    Well, actually you get the bars just by holding down break on reset.
    QAZPLM then gives you the Sinister Diagnostic Tests Of Doom That Might
    Blow Up The World (or something like that, I can't remember the exact
    text of the warning message.)

    For what it's worth, Fuse just uses RGB levels of 0 and 192 for dark,
    and 0 and 255 for bright.

  5. Re: Speccy colour palette

    I guess what I'm trying to say is that the colours, assuming a properly set
    up TV should not be capable of being wrong, as the pal system evens out the
    errors and thus they should be nulled out. The errors most often seen are
    from stupid settings on the TV Occasionally the black level can be wrong, or
    the linearity of the grey levels a bit off, making things loot either soot
    and reflective paint, or very drab and over saturated where it should not
    be, but none of that can be changed in the Speccy unless its an old iss 32
    48k, or a pesky toast rack 128.

    Brian

    --
    Brian Gaff....Note, this account does not accept Bcc: email.
    graphics are great, but the blind can't hear them
    Email: briang1@blueyonder.co.uk
    __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ __________


    "Matthew Westcott" wrote in message
    news:56r5piF2adf5jU1@mid.individual.net...
    > Chris Young wrote:
    >> That only helps if I have a Speccy to compare it against :-)
    >>
    >> What I'm really asking, if which of the many emulators and other
    >> utilities that include a Spectrum palette has the most accurate colour
    >> reproduction, and what are the hex values?
    >>
    >> The bars are called up by holding down QAZPLM (and another key - space
    >> or enter?) while resetting. You need about six hands to achieve this.

    >
    > Well, actually you get the bars just by holding down break on reset.
    > QAZPLM then gives you the Sinister Diagnostic Tests Of Doom That Might
    > Blow Up The World (or something like that, I can't remember the exact text
    > of the warning message.)
    >
    > For what it's worth, Fuse just uses RGB levels of 0 and 192 for dark, and
    > 0 and 255 for bright.




  6. Re: Speccy colour palette


    The PAL system evens out errors in Hue but the Colour, Contrast and
    Brightness knobs can all affect the Saturation and Value that are
    perceived on the screen.

    I can remember back in the depths of time doing some work on
    comparing the colours of a BBC Micro, a Spectrum and a C64
    driving monitors directly and through modulators comparing the
    various colours against a pantone book. I can't remember the
    conclusions (other than that the spectrum colours through the
    modulator were more "washy" and in some respects pleasanter to
    read).

    I'm afraid the results are lost to posterity on a set of
    5 1/4" discs that got scratched to bits by a rusty drive head
    a couple of years back!

    Dom

    "Brian Gaff" wrote in message
    news:b04Oh.497$NK2.255@text.news.blueyonder.co.uk. ..
    >I guess what I'm trying to say is that the colours, assuming a properly set
    >up TV should not be capable of being wrong, as the pal system evens out the
    >errors and thus they should be nulled out. The errors most often seen are
    >from stupid settings on the TV Occasionally the black level can be wrong,
    >or the linearity of the grey levels a bit off, making things loot either
    >soot and reflective paint, or very drab and over saturated where it should
    >not be, but none of that can be changed in the Speccy unless its an old iss
    >32 48k, or a pesky toast rack 128.
    >
    > Brian
    >
    > --
    > Brian Gaff....Note, this account does not accept Bcc: email.
    > graphics are great, but the blind can't hear them
    > Email: briang1@blueyonder.co.uk
    > __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ __________
    >
    >
    > "Matthew Westcott" wrote in message
    > news:56r5piF2adf5jU1@mid.individual.net...
    >> Chris Young wrote:
    >>> That only helps if I have a Speccy to compare it against :-)
    >>>
    >>> What I'm really asking, if which of the many emulators and other
    >>> utilities that include a Spectrum palette has the most accurate colour
    >>> reproduction, and what are the hex values?
    >>>
    >>> The bars are called up by holding down QAZPLM (and another key - space
    >>> or enter?) while resetting. You need about six hands to achieve this.

    >>
    >> Well, actually you get the bars just by holding down break on reset.
    >> QAZPLM then gives you the Sinister Diagnostic Tests Of Doom That Might
    >> Blow Up The World (or something like that, I can't remember the exact
    >> text of the warning message.)
    >>
    >> For what it's worth, Fuse just uses RGB levels of 0 and 192 for dark, and
    >> 0 and 255 for bright.

    >
    >




  7. Re: Speccy colour palette

    The correct RGB values for the eight colours are exactly as you would
    expect:

    Black: #000000
    Blue: #0000FF
    Red: #FF0000
    Magenta: #FF00FF
    Green: #00FF00
    Cyan: #00FFFF
    Yellow: #FFFF00
    White: #FFFFFF

    The problem is that the brightness level is carried on its own
    channel. This is why on some monitors there are only eight colours,
    and on others there is a 'bright' version of black. Any RGB setting
    will only be an approximation. However, it might be possible to
    determine the correct Pantone colour and work back to an RGB colour
    from that, but who has access a Spectrum and the correct monitor
    calibration tools to figure that out?


  8. Re: Speccy colour palette

    The patent filing for the spectrum's display organization
    that can be found on Geoff's page contains a circuit
    diagram showing how the bright is generated. One
    could probably figure out the % change in output
    signal generated by the bright bit and come up with
    some RGB values from that.


  9. Re: Speccy colour palette

    I remember the Speccy's non-bright white as actually being cream... was
    that common?

  10. Re: Speccy colour palette

    Cruithne3753 wrote:

    > I remember the Speccy's non-bright white as actually being cream...
    > was that common?



    hmmm, light grey in my eyes... white bright is o.k.



    Best Regards,

    Daniel Mandic

  11. Re: Speccy colour palette

    On Mar 27, 5:36 pm, "cheve...@gmail.com" wrote:
    > The correct RGB values for the eight colours are exactly as you would
    > expect:
    >
    > Black: #000000
    > Blue: #0000FF
    > Red: #FF0000
    > Magenta: #FF00FF
    > Green: #00FF00
    > Cyan: #00FFFF
    > Yellow: #FFFF00
    > White: #FFFFFF


    Those are the "ideal" values. I tried those on my ZX Spectrum loading
    screen saver at
    http://www.zx81stuff.org.uk/spectrum/loadingscreen.html
    The results looked nothing like the picture on a regular TV via
    modulated or composite input. In particular the green and magenta are
    way too bright.
    There's quite a range of results depending on the Spectrum model, and
    the state of the components and the setup of the TV, so I guess there
    is no definitive answer.
    I haven't done a side-by-side comparison to get a better set of
    values, but if I get time I may give it a try.

    Cheers, Simon
    ZX81 collection: www.zx81stuff.org.uk


  12. Re: Speccy colour palette

    The values I currently use for my screensaver are 0xF8 for bright and
    0xC8 for normal, but that was just to get an image that looked about
    right, without any actual comparison with a "real" picture.

    Cheers, Simon
    ZX81 collection:www.zx81stuff.org.uk



  13. Re: Speccy colour palette

    "Cruithne3753" wrote:

    > I remember the Speccy's non-bright white as actually
    > being cream... was that common?


    For me it was always grey. Cream has more of a yellow component.

    Eq.



  14. Re: Speccy colour palette

    Cruithne3753 wrote:
    > I remember the Speccy's non-bright white as actually being cream...
    > was that common?


    Many smokers in the house?

  15. Re: Speccy colour palette

    fuzzix wrote:
    > Cruithne3753 wrote:
    >> I remember the Speccy's non-bright white as actually being cream...
    >> was that common?

    >
    > Many smokers in the house?


    In an non-smoking house, mine was cream too. And it was the spectrum not
    the telly that caused this. Because I latter got another 48k and a +2
    and both of these where much whiter.

    C.

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